SOLAR PANELS CHINA: SUNTECH

April 21, 2011 at 8:53 pm | Posted in China, Earth, Ecology, Economics, Financial, Research, Science & Technology | Leave a comment

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Suntech Power Holdings Co., Ltd.

Suntech Power Holdings Co., Ltd. (Chinese: pinyin: Shàngdé) (NYSESTP) is the world’s largest producer of solar panels, with 1,800MW of annual production capacity by the end of 2010. With offices or production facilities in every major market, Suntech has delivered more than 13,000,000 solar panels to thousands of companies in more than 80 countries around the world [3]. As the center for the company’s global operations, Suntech Headquarters, in Wuxi, China, features the world’s largest building integrated solar facade[4].

Installations

Suntech Power has supplied or installed solar modules for numerous solar power plants and systems around the world. Notable installations include:

The company’s Suntech Energy Solutions division completed Google‘s 1.6 MW solar installation in June 2007.[5]

Suntech Power joined with Israeli company Solarit Doral to build Israel’s largest solar power station, a 50 kW rooftop project in the Israeli settlement of Katzrin in the Golan Heights, which was connected to the electricity grid in December 2008.[6][7]

Global Operations

Suntech Power has representative offices in China, Australia, the United States, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Japan, and Dubai, as well as production facilities in Wuxi, Luoyang, Qinghai, Shanghai, Germany, Japan, and Goodyear, Arizona.

Suntech America is based in San Francisco, California, and the company has plans to start a production facility in Phoenix, Arizona in 2010.[8] Suntech also has executives of their US operations in top posts in American solar panel industry groups.[9]

Awards

Suntech Power was recognized as the 2008 Frost & Sullivan Solar Energy Development Company of the Year. Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Mary John commented on the recognition, “The company’s pioneering success in developing energy-efficient, cost-effective and customizable building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems and crystalline PV cells, and modules for solar energy conversion into electricity are highly commendable. It has gone beyond just meeting global energy needs to anticipating them as well and highly satisfied customers testify that the BIPV systems and other energy-efficient products are customized precisely to their needs.”[10]

The Andalay AC Solar PV Panel was awarded one on MSN’s most brilliant products of 2009 because of innovations that advanced their ease of installation and use.[11] Suntech Power is one of the main manufacturers of components for the Andalay Solar Panel sold by Akeena Solar (AKNS).[12]

Founder

Dr Shi Zhengrong (born c. 1963[13]) is the founder [14], chairman and chief executive officer of Suntech Power.

He is a graduate of the University of NSW‘s School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering.[15][16] At UNSW, Dr. Shi studied under Professor Martin Green and met Stuart Wenham, now Suntech’s Chief Technology Officer.

Dr. Zhengrong Shi was honored in January 2010 as a finalist for the Zayed Future Energy Prize. In 2007, Dr. Shi was named one of Time Magazine’s Heros of the Environment.He is often referred to as the world’s first ‘green billionaire’.[17]

Investors

Before going public on the NYSE in 2005, Suntech was funded by a consortium of private equity firms, including Actis Capital and Goldman Sachs. The consolidated private equity investment into Suntech is generally considered to be one of China’s most profitable private equity investments ever, as each firm is thought to have made gains well over 10x on their original investments.

See also

References

  1. 1.                              a b c Suntech’s annual income statement via Wikinvest
  2. 2.                              a b Suntech’s annual balance sheet via Wikinvest
  3. 3.                              http://ir.suntech-power.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=192654&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1533389&hilight=
  4. 4.                              http://www.green-energy-news.com/nwslnks/clips109/jan09010.html
  5. 5.                              Google Solar Panel Project
  6. 6.                              Israel opens largest solar plant with Chinese help, December 10, 2008.
  7. 7.                              Chinese PV pioneer helps build Israel’s biggest solar power station, Xinhua, December 9, 2008.
  8. 8.                              http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=192654&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1355511&highlight=
  9. 9.                              Retrieved November 12, 2009, from Solar Energy Industries Association: About: SEIA Board website: http://www.seia.org/cs/seia_board
  10. 10.                         http://www.redorbit.com/news/business/1342480/frost__sullivan_recognizes_suntech_power_for_its_technical_expertise/index.html
  11. 11.                         MSN Tech and Gadgets. 10 Most Brilliant Products of 2009. Retrieved November 12, 2009, from MSN website: http://tech.msn.com/products/slideshow.aspx?cp-documentid=22104619&imageindex=6
  12. 12.                         Google Finance. Akeena Solar, Inc. (Public, NASDAQ:AKNS). Retrieved November 12, 2009, from Akeena Solar Inc. company profile website: http://www.google.com/finance?q=NASDAQ:AKNS
  13. 13.                         The alternative rich list. September 22, 2006. Accessed May 7, 2007.
  14. 14.                         [1]
  15. 15.                         School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering
  16. 16.                         Dr. Zhengrong Shi
  17. 17.                         http://www.time.com/time/specials/2007/article/0,28804,1663317_1663322_1669932,00.html

Suntech Power Holdings Co., Ltd. Type Public (NYSESTP)

Industry Photovoltaics

Founded September 2001

Founder(s) Shi Zhengrong

Headquarters Wuxi, Jiangsu province, People’s Republic of China Number of locations United States, Germany, Switzerland, Japan, Australia, Italy, Spain

Revenue US$1.92 Billion (FY 2008)[1] Operating income US$215 Million (FY 2008)[1] Net income US$87.9 Million (FY 2008)[1] Total assets US$3.22 Billion (FY 2008) [2] Total equity US$1.07 Billion (FY 2008)[2] Website www.suntech-power.com/

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GREEN ECONOMIC FINANCE

February 23, 2011 at 1:18 am | Posted in Earth, Ecology, Economics, Financial, Globalization, Research | Leave a comment

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INVESTING IN ‘GREEN ECONOMY’ CAN BOOST GROWTH,

REDUCE POVERTY — UN REPORT

UNNews UNNews@un.org

Mon, 21 Feb

New York, Feb 21 2011

INVESTING IN ‘GREEN ECONOMY’ CAN BOOST GROWTH, REDUCE

POVERTY — UN REPORT

Investing around $1.3 trillion — or two per cent of global gross domestic product (GDP) — into ten key sectors can kick-start a transition towards a low-carbon, resource-efficient ‘green economy’ that can also help reduce poverty, says a new United Nations report launched today.

The UN Environment Programme (UNEP) presented the report, “Towards a Green Economy: Pathways to Sustainable Development and Poverty Eradication,” to environment ministers from over 100 countries at the opening of the UNEP Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum in Nairobi.

The http://www.unep.org/GreenEconomy/Portals/93/documents/Full_GER_screen.pdf report identifies the following sectors as key to greening the global economy: agriculture, buildings, energy supply, fisheries, forestry, industry including energy efficiency, tourism, transport, waste management and water.

It sees a green economy as not only relevant to more developed economies but as a key catalyst for growth and poverty eradication in developing ones too, where in some cases close to 90 per cent of the GDP of the poor is linked to nature or natural capital such as forests and freshwaters.

“With 2.5 billion people living on less than $2 a day and with more than two billion people being added to the global population by 2050, it is clear that we must continue to develop and grow our economies,” said UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner.

“But this development cannot come at the expense of the very life support systems on land, in the oceans or in our atmosphere that sustain our economies, and thus, the lives of each and everyone of us,” he added.

“The green economy provides a vital part of the answer of how to keep humanity’s ecological footprint within planetary boundaries. It aims to link the environmental imperatives for changing course to economic and social outcomes — in particular economic development, jobs and equity.”

According to UNEP, the world currently spends between one and two per cent of global GDP on a range of subsidies that often perpetuate unsustainable resources use in areas such as fossil fuels, agriculture, including pesticide subsidies, water and fisheries.

Many of these are contributing to environmental damage and inefficiencies in the global economy, and phasing them down or phasing them out would generate multiple benefits while freeing up resources to finance a green economy transition.

The report does acknowledge that in the short-term, job losses in some sectors, such as fisheries, are inevitable if they are to transition towards sustainability. Investment, in some cases funded from cuts in harmful subsidies, will be required to re-skill and re-train some sections of the global workforce to ensure a fair and socially acceptable transition.

The report makes the case that over time the number of “new and decent jobs created” in sectors — ranging from renewable energies to more sustainable agriculture — will however offset those lost from the former “brown economy.”

The green economy, in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication, and international environment governance are the two themes for UNEP’s Governing Council session, which is also looking ahead to the UN Conference on Sustainable Development scheduled to be held in Rio de Janeiro in June 2012.

“We live in some of the most challenging times that perhaps any generation has faced, but also one of the most exciting moments where the possibilities of re-shaping and re-focusing towards a sustainable 21st century have never been more tangible,” Mr. Steiner noted in his http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=663&ArticleID=6904&l=en&t=long opening address to the session.

Feb 21 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

INVESTING IN ‘GREEN ECONOMY’ CAN BOOST GROWTH, REDUCE

POVERTY — UN REPORT

UNNews UNNews@un.org

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

Mon, 21 Feb

New York, Feb 21 2011

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GLOBAL GEOPHYSICAL CHANGE

February 5, 2011 at 4:20 pm | Posted in Earth, Ecology, Globalization, Research | Leave a comment

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Global Change

AGU E-Alert (alerts@agu.org)

Sat 2/05/11

New articles published in Global Change are available online.  http://www.agu.org/pubs/current/16/

PAPERS IN PRESS: access accepted manuscripts within days of acceptance.
Visit http://www.agu.org/pubs/journals/pip.shtml (subscription required)

Top downloads: http://www.agu.org/topdownloads/topdownloads.shtml

Journal subscriptions: http://www.agu.org/membership/subscriptions.shtml

Global Change – Published Past 7 Days

McLinden, C. A.; Fioletov, V.
Quantifying stratospheric ozone trends: Complications due to stratospheric cooling
Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, No. 3, L03808
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010GL046012
05 February 2011

Russo, S.; Sterl, A.
Global changes in indices describing moderate temperature extremes from the daily output of a climate model
J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 116, No. D3, D03104
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010JD014727
05 February 2011

Wouters, B.; Riva, R. E. M.; Lavallée, D. A.; Bamber, J. L.
Seasonal variations in sea level induced by continental water mass: First results from GRACE
Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, No. 3, L03303
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010GL046128
04 February 2011

Cai, W.; Sullivan, A.; Cowan, T.; Ribbe, J.; Shi, G.
Simulation of the Indian Ocean Dipole: A relevant criterion for selecting models for climate projections
Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, No. 3, L03704
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010GL046242
04 February 2011

Horgan, H. J.; Walker, R. T.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Alley, R. B.
Surface elevation changes at the front of the Ross Ice Shelf: Implications for basal melting
J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 116, No. C2, C02005
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010JC006192
04 February 2011

Hofmann, M.; Morales Maqueda, M. A.
The response of Southern Ocean eddies to increased midlatitude westerlies: A non-eddy resolving model study
Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, No. 3, L03605
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010GL045972
03 February 2011

Thomas, Andrea M.; Rupper, Summer; Christensen, William F.
Characterizing the statistical properties and interhemispheric distribution of Dansgaard-Oeschger events
J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 116, No. D3, D03103
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010JD014834
03 February 2011

Barbero, Leticia; Boutin, Jacqueline; Merlivat, Liliane; Martin, Nicolas; Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.; Wanninkhof, Rik
Importance of water mass formation regions for the air-sea CO[2] flux estimate in the Southern Ocean
Global Biogeochem. Cycles, Vol. 25, No. 1, GB1005
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010GB003818
01 February 2011

Frankenberg, C.; Butz, A.; Toon, G. C.
Disentangling chlorophyll fluorescence from atmospheric scattering effects in O[2] A-band spectra of reflected sun-light
Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, No. 3, L03801
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010GL045896
01 February 2011

Grießinger, Jussi; Bräuning, Achim; Helle, Gerd; Thomas, Axel; Schleser, Gerhard
Late Holocene Asian summer monsoon variability reflected by d^18O in tree-rings from Tibetan junipers
Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, No. 3, L03701
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010GL045988
01 February 2011

Kucharski, F.; Kang, I.-S.; Farneti, R.; Feudale, L.
Tropical Pacific response to 20th century Atlantic warming
Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, No. 3, L03702
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010GL046248
01 February 2011

Chang, You-Soon; Rosati, Anthony; Zhang, Shaoqing
A construction of pseudo salinity profiles for the global ocean: Method and evaluation
J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 116, No. C2, C02002
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010JC006386
01 February 2011

Global Change

AGU E-Alert (alerts@agu.org) Fri 2/04/11

Sat 2/05/11
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CLIMATE CHANGE DATA

January 26, 2011 at 9:13 pm | Posted in Earth, Ecology, Economics, Financial, Globalization, Research | Leave a comment

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BETTER CLIMATE CHANGE DATA VITAL FOR FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

UN-BACKED REPORT

unnews@un.org

New York, Jan 12 2011

Wed, 12 Jan 2011

BETTER CLIMATE CHANGE DATA VITAL FOR FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS –

UN-BACKED REPORT

With insurers, lenders, asset managers and their customers increasingly affected by the impacts of climate change and the risks likely to grow in the future better access to relevant data is vital for the world’s financial institutions, according to a United Nations-backed study issued today.

For the sector to manage climatic risks affecting their business portfolios and give the best possible advice to their customers, financial institutions need access to applied information such as climate change predictions, modelling, analysis, and interpretation, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) said of “http://www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/advancing_adaptation.pdf

advancing adaptation through climate information services.

Results of a global survey on the information requirements of the financial sector, the international survey of more than 60 institutions, which it compiled in cooperation with the Sustainable Business Institute of Germany:

To date the key role that financial institutions and other private sector decision-makers can play in increasing the climate resilience of economies and societies has been neglected at best, the head of the UNEP Finance Initiative, Paul Clements-Hunt, said. “The rapid reduction in greenhouse gases and the adaptation to the unavoidable effects of global warming need to go hand-in-hand if we are to cope with the climate challenge.

This study is a first step in identifying what is needed so that financial institutions can start playing their important role in accelerating the shift to climate-resilient economies,” he added.

Climate change forecasts and predictions of the resulting economic impacts will never be perfect and will inevitably feature some element of uncertainty, but the more information and expertise regarding climate change and its uncertainties that is available to financial institutions, the better these risks can be calculated, UNEP said in a “http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=655&ArticleID=6884&l=en news release. This will enable insurers, re-insurers, lenders, and asset managers to price and absorb these risks more effectively.

This can be crucial not only to the performance of individual businesses and financial institutions, but to the entire economic tissue of communities affected by climate change and the social well-being it underpins, it added.

This study confirms that what private sector institutions need in order to become real ‘adaptation catalysts’ is objective and reliable information, said Mark Fulton, Managing Director at Deutsche Bank Climate Advisors and Co-Chair of UNEP Finance Initiative’s Climate Change Working Group.

We need to work towards enhancing the access of private sector decision makers to climate information as well as, most importantly, improving the reliability and accuracy of our climate models and forecasts, Mr. Fulton noted.

The study, sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, noted that such information gaps can be closed by continued research towards more reliable climate modelling and forecasting, as well as enhanced translation of scientific knowledge and existing information into user-friendly information. Such efforts are likely to require more intensive collaboration between users and suppliers, public and private actors, scientists and decision makers.

The UNEP Finance Initiative is a global partnership between UNEP and the financial sector, in which over 190 institutions, including banks, insurers and fund managers, work with UNEP to understand the impacts of environmental and social considerations on financial performance.
Jan 12 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

BETTER CLIMATE CHANGE DATA VITAL FOR FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

UN-BACKED REPORT

unnews@un.org

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

New York, Jan 12 2011

Wed, 12 Jan 2011

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CARBON CONSTRAINED WORLD: KC FED PAPER

January 26, 2011 at 2:23 am | Posted in Ecology, Economics, Globalization, Research | Leave a comment

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Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Fourth Quarter 2010 Economic Review‏

KC Fed Update
Wed 1/26/11
The following information is now available on the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City's Web site

"Are U.S. States Equally Prepared for a Carbon Constrained World?" is now on our website. In this fourth quarter Economic Review article, Mark C. Snead and Amy A. Jones evaluate the current energy posture of the states and thus how prepared they are to cope with ongoing trends in energy use, especially restrictions on carbon emissions.     

The article is available at http://www.kansascityfed.org/publications/research/er/index.cfm?ealert=ER0125a

Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City's Web site: http://www.kansascityfed.org

Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Fourth Quarter 2010 Economic Review‏

KC Fed Update
Wed 1/26/11

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GREENHOUSE GASES

January 25, 2011 at 3:30 am | Posted in Development, Earth, Ecology, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, Science & Technology | Leave a comment

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DRAMATIC GREENHOUSE GAS CUTS ARE BOTH ACHIEVABLE AND

AFFORDABLE – UN

New York, Jan 24 2011

UNNews UNNews@un.org

DRAMATIC GREENHOUSE GAS CUTS ARE BOTH ACHIEVABLE AND AFFORDABLE

– UN

Mon, 24 Jan 2011

Dramatic cuts in industrial emissions of the global warming greenhouse gases that threaten to drastically change Earth’s climate are achievable in both developed and developing countries at acceptable cost with the right policies, the United Nations “http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=7881&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=851&cHash=54ac5a838bef4957273c67b9d9c4e941 reported today.

In a series of studies, the UN Industrial Development Organization (“http://www.unido.org/ UNIDO), an agency mandated to promote sustainable industrial development in developing countries, highlighted the need to combine energy efficiency, renewable energy and the capture and storage of greenhouse carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions to stay below the danger threshold of an average temperature rise of two degrees above pre-industrial levels by 2050.

Cost-effective renewable energy could supply 21 per cent of all industrial energy by 2050, providing ten per cent of all reductions needed to counter a potential future of devastating droughts, floods, desertification, rising oceans, ever more powerful storms, shrinking glaciers and other possible effects of climate change.

At nearly two gigatonnes of CO2, this represents 25 per cent of the total expected emission reductions of the industry sector – equivalent to the total current CO2 emissions of France, Germany, Italy and Spain, or around one third of current emissions in the United States.

Industrial energy efficiency potential worldwide amounts to 26 per cent, with that in developing countries nearly twice as high as in developed nations, according to the reports.

“Once these potentials are exhausted carbon capture and storage must come into play,” UNIDO said. “This technology is rapidly evolving not only for power plants but also for a wide range of industrial applications.”

With regard to affordability, the UN agency stressed that many of the required measures could reduce costs and enhance competitiveness and productivity. Renewable sources include solar energy and bio-fuels such as those produced from plants like ethanol, as opposed to finite fossil fuels like oil and coal.

“The competitiveness of biofuels with fossil fuels is strongly dependent on national energy policy frameworks and energy prices,” one of the reports, “http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Services/Energy_and_Climate_Change/Energy_Efficiency/Renewables_%20Industrial_%20Applications.pdf

Renewable Energy in Industrial Applications – an assessment of the 2050 potential, stressed. “Renewables are not cost competitive where fossil fuels are subsidized. They are, however, already cost competitive in many cases and many countries with unsubsidized fossil fuels.

“This is even more so where CO2 emissions carry a financial penalty that reflects their long-term economic and environmental impact,” the report added, cautioning that the potential of increased renewable energy can only be realized “if specific policies are developed to create a business environment conducive to private sector investment.”

The UN has been closely involved in the efforts to counter climate change, most recently hosting talks in Cancún, Mexico, which resulted in pledged funds to help developing countries mitigate its effects and took steps to curb the deforestation that accounts for nearly one-fifth of global carbon emissions.

The other UNIDO reports involved in the study are: “http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Services/Energy_and_Climate_Change/Energy_Efficiency/Benchmarking_%20Energy_%20Policy_Tool.pdf

Global Industrial Energy Efficiency Benchmarking – An Energy Policy Tool, and

http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Services/Energy_and_Climate_Change/Energy_Efficiency/CCS_%20industry_%20synthesis_final.pdf

Carbon Capture and Storage in Industrial Applications: Technology Synthesis Report. Jan 24 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

DRAMATIC GREENHOUSE GAS CUTS ARE BOTH ACHIEVABLE AND AFFORDABLE – UN

New York, Jan 24 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

UNNews UNNews@un.org

DRAMATIC GREENHOUSE GAS CUTS ARE BOTH ACHIEVABLE AND AFFORDABLE

– UN

Mon, 24 Jan 2011

RECORD-SETTING 2010 HIGHLIGHTS GLOBAL WARMING TREND, SAYS UN

WEATHER AGENCY

UNNews UNNews@un.org

New York, Jan 20 2011

RECORD-SETTING 2010 HIGHLIGHTS GLOBAL WARMING TREND, SAYS UN

WEATHER AGENCY

Thu, 20 Jan 2011

The year 2010 ranked as the warmest on record – together with 2005 and 1998 –http://www.wmo.int/pages/mediacentre/press_releases/pr_906_en.html according to the United Nations World Meteorological Organization (WMO), which added that last year also witnessed a large number of extreme weather events, including the heat wave in Russia and the devastating floods in Pakistan.

In 2010, the global average temperature was 0.53 degrees Celsius (0.95 degrees Fahrenheit) above the mean for the period from 1961 to 1990, the reference period for the Geneva-based WMO.

In addition, Arctic sea-ice cover in December 2010 was the lowest on record, with an average monthly extent of 12 million square kilometres, 1.35 million square kilometres below the 1979-2000 average for December.

“The 2010 data confirm the Earth’s significant long-term warming trend,” said WMO Secretary-General Michel Jarraud. “The 10 warmest years on record have all occurred since 1998.”

WMO stated that 2010 was an “exceptionally warm” year over much of Africa and southern and western Asia, and in Greenland and Arctic Canada, with many parts of these regions having their hottest years on record. The month of December was exceptionally warm in eastern Canada and Greenland.

Meanwhile, it was “abnormally cold” through large parts of northern and western Europe, with monthly average temperatures as much as 10 degrees Celsius below normal at some locations in Norway and Sweden. Many places in Scandinavia had their coldest December on record.

December in Central England was the coldest since 1890, and it was colder than average in large parts of Russia and in the eastern United States.

Last year was also marked by a large number of extreme weather events, WMO noted, including the heat wave in Russia and the monsoonal floods that affected 20 million people in Pakistan.

The agency also highlighted a number of major weather events in late 2010 and early 2011, including the January floods that have affected more than 800,000 people in Sri Lanka, the flash floods that have resulted in over 700 deaths near the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, and the severe flooding in eastern Australia which is expected to be the most costly natural disaster in that country’s history.

The information presented by WMO is compiled with input from the agency’s 189 member States, and is based on climate data from networks of land-based weather and climate stations, ships and buoys, as well as satellites. Jan 20 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

RECORD-SETTING 2010 HIGHLIGHTS GLOBAL WARMING TREND, SAYS UN

WEATHER AGENCY

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

UNNews UNNews@un.org

New York, Jan 20 2011

RECORD-SETTING 2010 HIGHLIGHTS GLOBAL WARMING TREND, SAYS UN

WEATHER AGENCY

Thu, 20 Jan 2011

DRAMATIC GREENHOUSE GAS CUTS ARE BOTH ACHIEVABLE AND AFFORDABLE – UN

New York, Jan 24 2011

UNNews UNNews@un.org

DRAMATIC GREENHOUSE GAS CUTS ARE BOTH ACHIEVABLE AND AFFORDABLE – UN

Mon, 24 Jan 2011

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CONFERENCE ON GLOBAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: VENICE JUNE 16 2011

January 5, 2011 at 5:11 pm | Posted in Development, Earth, Ecology, Economics, Financial, Globalization, Research | Leave a comment

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CALL FOR PAPERS

14 th Annual Conference on Global Economic

Analysis

“Governing Global Challenges:

Climate Change, Trade, Finance and

Development”

June 16th-18th, 2011

San Giobbe Campus, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Venice Italy

Wed 1/05/11

CALL FOR PAPERS: 14th Annual Conference on Global Economic Analysis, 16-18 June 2011, Venice, Italy

Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (events.ve@feem.it)

Deadline for abstracts’ submission and organized session proposals: 15 January 2011

The 14th Annual Conference on Global Economic Analysis will be held from the 16th to the 18th of June 2011 in Venice, Italy, at the School of Economics and Business of the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice.

The Conference will be organised by the Centre for Global Trade Analysis of Purdue University, the Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) and the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, in cooperation with the International Center for Climate Governance (ICCG), the Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change (CMCC), Climate Policy Initiative – Venice (CPI) and the Center for Thematic Environmental Networks (TEN Center).

The goal of the Conference is to promote the exchange of ideas among economists conducting quantitative analysis of global economic issues. Particular emphasis will be placed on applied general equilibrium methods, data, and application. Related theoretical and applied work is also welcome.

The overall theme of the Conference is “Governing Global Challenges: Climate Change, Trade, Finance and Development” with minor sub-themes on:
•Environment and Climate
•Trade
•Distributional and Equity Issues
•Dynamics and Growth
•Energy Supply and Security
•International Health Issues
•Poverty, Employment and Development
•Conflicts
•Natural Resources Supply and Security
•Methodology, Software and Data

Abstracts and organized session proposals are currently being accepted on the GTAP website through January 15th, 2011.
Registrations will be accepted from early January through April 30th
, 2011.

For further information about this Conference, please visit the Conference homepage on the GTAP website.

Contacts

For information about how to submit an application please contact:
Meghan Alexander
Center for Global Trade Analysis
Purdue University
West Lafayette, Indiana, USA
E-mail: megalex@purdue.edu

For information about logistics please contact:
Angela Marigo
Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei
Venice, Italy
E-mail: angela.marigo@feem.it
CALL FOR PAPERS

14th Annual Conference on Global Economic Analysis

“Governing Global Challenges: Climate Change, Trade, Finance and Development”

June 16th-18th, 2011

San Giobbe Campus, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, VeniceItaly

Wed 1/05/11

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LAND DEGRADATION IN CHINA

January 4, 2011 at 2:12 am | Posted in China, Development, Earth, Ecology, Economics, History, Research | Leave a comment

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LAND DEGRADATION AMONG CHINA’S

FOOD SUPPLY CHALLENGES

SAYS UN EXPERT

UNNews UNNews@un.org

New York, Dec 23 2010

LAND DEGRADATION AMONG CHINA’S FOOD SUPPLY

CHALLENGES, SAYS UN EXPERT

Thu, 23 Dec 2010

While China has made great economic and social progress in recent years, land degradation and the widening income gap between rural and urban are posing challenges to ensuring the right to food for its population, says an independent United Nations human rights expert.

Within a few decades, China has been able to feed itself and to feed one fifth of the entire world population. That is really impressive. Yet, considering a countrys global agricultural output and the progressive realization of the right to food are two different things, said Olivier De Schutter, who ended his mission to China today.

The right to food depends on people having incomes that allow them to purchase food, noted Mr. De Schutter, the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food.

It also requires that food systems are sustainable so that satisfying current needs are not at the expense of the countrys ability to meet future needs. It is obvious that these two conditions are facing important challenges today.

The expert highlighted the remarkable economic and social progress made by the worlds most populous nation in the past 30 years, lifting several hundred million people out of poverty and benefiting food security.

However, the shrinking of arable land and the massive land degradation threatens the ability of the country to maintain current levels of agricultural production, while the widening gap between rural and urban is an important challenge to the right to food of the Chinese population, he stated.

Since 1997, China has lost 8.2 million hectares (20.2 million acres) of arable land due to urbanization or industrialization, forest replanting programmes, and damage caused by natural disasters.

Today, 37 per cent of China’s total territory suffers from land degradation, and the country’s per capita available land is now 40 per cent of the world average, noted Mr. De Schutter.

This shrinking of arable land represents a major threat to the ability of China to maintain its current self-sufficiency in grain, and it fuels competition over land and land evictions, he stated.

The expert added that the recent food price hikes in China are a harbinger of what may be lying ahead, while also warning that climate change will cause agricultural productivity to drop by 5 to 10 per cent by 2030 unless mitigation actions are taken.

The widening urban-rural income gap was another concern for the Special Rapporteur, who also covered issues such as land grabbing and the situation of nomadic herders in Western Provinces and Autonomous Regions during his mission.

Mr. De Schutter, who works in an independent and unpaid capacity, will present his full report to the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council next year. `
Dec 23 2010

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

LAND DEGRADATION AMONG CHINA’S FOOD SUPPLY

CHALLENGES, SAYS UN EXPERT

UNNews UNNews@un.org

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

New York, Dec 23 2010

LAND DEGRADATION AMONG CHINA’S FOOD SUPPLY CHALLENGES,

SAYS UN EXPERT

Thu, 23 Dec 2010

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CLIMATE CHANGE ABSTRACTS: 2010

December 20, 2010 at 7:46 pm | Posted in Earth, Ecology, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, Science & Technology, World-system | Leave a comment

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The Royal Society 2010

Selected Abstracts

· Beyond ‘dangerous’ climate change: emission scenarios for a new world

The Copenhagen Accord reiterates the international community’s commitment to ‘hold the increase in global temperature below 2 degrees Celsius’. Yet its preferred focus on global emission peak dates and longer-term reduction targets, without recourse to cumulative emission budgets, belies seriously the scale and scope of mitigation necessary to meet such a commitment. Moreover, the pivotal importance of emissions from non-Annex 1 nations in shaping available space for Annex 1 emission pathways received, and continues to receive, little attention. Building on previous studies, this paper uses a cumulative emissions framing, broken down to Annex 1 and non-Annex 1 nations, to understand the implications of rapid emission growth in nations such as China and India, for mitigation rates elsewhere. The analysis suggests that despite high-level statements to the contrary, there is now little to no chance of maintaining the global mean surface temperature at or below 2°C. Moreover, the impacts associated with 2°C have been revised upwards, sufficiently so that 2°C now more appropriately represents the threshold between ‘dangerous’ and ‘extremely dangerous’ climate change. Ultimately, the science of climate change allied with the emission scenarios for Annex 1 and non-Annex 1 nations suggests a radically different framing of the mitigation and adaptation challenge from that accompanying many other analyses, particularly those directly informing policy.

· emission scenarios

· Annex 1

· non-Annex 1

· cumulative emissions

· climate policy

· emission pathways

· 2011 The Royal Society

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Full Text

· Abstract 2 of 11Articles

Cumulative carbon emissions, emissions floors and short-term rates of warming: implications for policy

A number of recent studies have found a strong link between peak human-induced global warming and cumulative carbon emissions from the start of the industrial revolution, while the link to emissions over shorter periods or in the years 2020 or 2050 is generally weaker. However, cumulative targets appear to conflict with the concept of a ‘floor’ in emissions caused by sectors such as food production. Here, we show that the introduction of emissions floors does not reduce the importance of cumulative emissions, but may make some warming targets unachievable. For pathways that give a most likely warming up to about 4°C, cumulative emissions from pre-industrial times to year 2200 correlate strongly with most likely resultant peak warming regardless of the shape of emissions floors used, providing a more natural long-term policy horizon than 2050 or 2100. The maximum rate of CO2-induced warming, which will affect the feasibility and cost of adapting to climate change, is not determined by cumulative emissions but is tightly aligned with peak rates of emissions. Hence, cumulative carbon emissions to 2200 and peak emission rates could provide a clear and simple framework for CO2 mitigation policy.

· cumulative emissions

· emissions floors

· rate of warming

· climate change

· 2011 The Royal Society

Full Text

· Abstract 3 of 11Articles

When could global warming reach 4°C?

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) assessed a range of scenarios of future greenhouse-gas emissions without policies to specifically reduce emissions, and concluded that these would lead to an increase in global mean temperatures of between 1.6°C and 6.9°C by the end of the twenty-first century, relative to pre-industrial. While much political attention is focused on the potential for global warming of 2°C relative to pre-industrial, the AR4 projections clearly suggest that much greater levels of warming are possible by the end of the twenty-first century in the absence of mitigation. The centre of the range of AR4-projected global warming was approximately 4°C. The higher end of the projected warming was associated with the higher emissions scenarios and models, which included stronger carbon-cycle feedbacks. The highest emissions scenario considered in the AR4 (scenario A1FI) was not examined with complex general circulation models (GCMs) in the AR4, and similarly the uncertainties in climate–carbon-cycle feedbacks were not included in the main set of GCMs. Consequently, the projections of warming for A1FI and/or with different strengths of carbon-cycle feedbacks are often not included in a wider discussion of the AR4 conclusions. While it is still too early to say whether any particular scenario is being tracked by current emissions, A1FI is considered to be as plausible as other non-mitigation scenarios and cannot be ruled out. (A1FI is a part of the A1 family of scenarios, with ‘FI’ standing for ‘fossil intensive’. This is sometimes erroneously written as A1F1, with number 1 instead of letter I.) This paper presents simulations of climate change with an ensemble of GCMs driven by the A1FI scenario, and also assesses the implications of carbon-cycle feedbacks for the climate-change projections. Using these GCM projections along with simple climate-model projections, including uncertainties in carbon-cycle feedbacks, and also comparing against other model projections from the IPCC, our best estimate is that the A1FI emissions scenario would lead to a warming of 4°C relative to pre-industrial during the 2070s. If carbon-cycle feedbacks are stronger, which appears less likely but still credible, then 4°C warming could be reached by the early 2060s in projections that are consistent with the IPCC’s ‘likely range’.

· climate modelling

· climate-change projections

· 4°C

· global warming

· dangerous climate change

· 2011 The Royal Society

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Full Text

· Abstract 4 of 11Articles

Regional temperature and precipitation changes under high-end (≥4°C) global warming

Climate models vary widely in their projections of both global mean temperature rise and regional climate changes, but are there any systematic differences in regional changes associated with different levels of global climate sensitivity? This paper examines model projections of climate change over the twenty-first century from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report which used the A2 scenario from the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, assessing whether different regional responses can be seen in models categorized as ‘high-end’ (those projecting 4°C or more by the end of the twenty-first century relative to the preindustrial). It also identifies regions where the largest climate changes are projected under high-end warming. The mean spatial patterns of change, normalized against the global rate of warming, are generally similar in high-end and ‘non-high-end’ simulations. The exception is the higher latitudes, where land areas warm relatively faster in boreal summer in high-end models, but sea ice areas show varying differences in boreal winter. Many continental interiors warm approximately twice as fast as the global average, with this being particularly accentuated in boreal summer, and the winter-time Arctic Ocean temperatures rise more than three times faster than the global average. Large temperature increases and precipitation decreases are projected in some of the regions that currently experience water resource pressures, including Mediterranean fringe regions, indicating enhanced pressure on water resources in these areas.

· regional climate change

· precipitation

· temperature

· global climate models

· 2011 The Royal Society

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Full Text

· Abstract 5 of 11Articles

Water availability in +2°C and +4°C worlds

While the parties to the UNFCCC agreed in the December 2009 Copenhagen Accord that a 2°C global warming over pre-industrial levels should be avoided, current commitments on greenhouse gas emissions reductions from these same parties will lead to a 50 : 50 chance of warming greater than 3.5°C. Here, we evaluate the differences in impacts and adaptation issues for water resources in worlds corresponding to the policy objective (+2°C) and possible reality (+4°C). We simulate the differences in impacts on surface run-off and water resource availability using a global hydrological model driven by ensembles of climate models with global temperature increases of 2°C and 4°C. We combine these with UN-based population growth scenarios to explore the relative importance of population change and climate change for water availability. We find that the projected changes in global surface run-off from the ensemble show an increase in spatial coherence and magnitude for a +4°C world compared with a +2°C one. In a +2°C world, population growth in most large river basins tends to override climate change as a driver of water stress, while in a +4°C world, climate change becomes more dominant, even compensating for population effects where climate change increases run-off. However, in some basins where climate change has positive effects, the seasonality of surface run-off becomes increasingly amplified in a +4°C climate.

· climate change impacts

· global water resources

· water resources stresses

· macro-scale hydrological model

· ensembles

· uncertainty

· 2011 The Royal Society

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Full Text

· Abstract 6 of 11Articles

Agriculture and food systems in sub-Saharan Africa in a 4°C+ world

Agricultural development in sub-Saharan Africa faces daunting challenges, which climate change and increasing climate variability will compound in vulnerable areas. The impacts of a changing climate on agricultural production in a world that warms by 4°C or more are likely to be severe in places. The livelihoods of many croppers and livestock keepers in Africa are associated with diversity of options. The changes in crop and livestock production that are likely to result in a 4°C+ world will diminish the options available to most smallholders. In such a world, current crop and livestock varieties and agricultural practices will often be inadequate, and food security will be more difficult to achieve because of commodity price increases and local production shortfalls. While adaptation strategies exist, considerable institutional and policy support will be needed to implement them successfully on the scale required. Even in the 2°C+ world that appears inevitable, planning for and implementing successful adaptation strategies are critical if agricultural growth in the region is to occur, food security be achieved and household livelihoods be enhanced. As part of this effort, better understanding of the critical thresholds in global and African food systems requires urgent research.

· food security

· adaptation

· climate change

· livelihoods

· 2011 The Royal Society

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Full Text

· Abstract 7 of 11Articles

Changes in the potential distribution of humid tropical forests on a warmer planet

The future of tropical forests has become one of the iconic issues in climate-change science. A number of studies that have explored this subject have tended to focus on the output from one or a few climate models, which work at low spatial resolution, whereas society and conservation-relevant assessment of potential impacts requires a finer scale. This study focuses on the role of climate on the current and future distribution of humid tropical forests (HTFs). We first characterize their contemporary climatological niche using annual rainfall and maximum climatological water stress, which also adequately describe the current distribution of other biomes within the tropics. As a first-order approximation of the potential extent of HTFs in future climate regimes defined by global warming of 2°C and 4°C, we investigate changes in the niche through a combination of climate-change anomaly patterns and higher resolution (5 km) maps of current climatology. The climate anomalies are derived using data from 17 coupled Atmosphere–Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) used in the Fourth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change. Our results confirm some risk of forest retreat, especially in eastern Amazonia, Central America and parts of Africa, but also indicate a potential for expansion in other regions, for example around the Congo Basin. The finer spatial scale enabled the depiction of potential resilient and vulnerable zones with practically useful detail. We further refine these estimates by considering the impact of new environmental regimes on plant water demand using the UK Met Office land-surface scheme (of the HadCM3 AOGCM). The CO2-related reduction in plant water demand lowers the risk of die-back and can lead to possible niche expansion in many regions. The analysis presented here focuses primarily on hydrological determinants of HTF extent. We conclude by discussing the role of other factors, notably the physiological effects of higher temperature.

· tropical forests

· climate change

· climate patterns

· water stress

· maximum climatological water deficit

· carbon dioxide

· This journal is © 2011 The Royal Society

Full Text

· Abstract 8 of 11Articles

Sea-level rise and its possible impacts given a ‘beyond 4°C world’ in the twenty-first century

The range of future climate-induced sea-level rise remains highly uncertain with continued concern that large increases in the twenty-first century cannot be ruled out. The biggest source of uncertainty is the response of the large ice sheets of Greenland and west Antarctica. Based on our analysis, a pragmatic estimate of sea-level rise by 2100, for a temperature rise of 4°C or more over the same time frame, is between 0.5 m and 2 m—the probability of rises at the high end is judged to be very low, but of unquantifiable probability. However, if realized, an indicative analysis shows that the impact potential is severe, with the real risk of the forced displacement of up to 187 million people over the century (up to 2.4% of global population). This is potentially avoidable by widespread upgrade of protection, albeit rather costly with up to 0.02 per cent of global domestic product needed, and much higher in certain nations. The likelihood of protection being successfully implemented varies between regions, and is lowest in small islands, Africa and parts of Asia, and hence these regions are the most likely to see coastal abandonment. To respond to these challenges, a multi-track approach is required, which would also be appropriate if a temperature rise of less than 4°C was expected. Firstly, we should monitor sea level to detect any significant accelerations in the rate of rise in a timely manner. Secondly, we need to improve our understanding of the climate-induced processes that could contribute to rapid sea-level rise, especially the role of the two major ice sheets, to produce better models that quantify the likely future rise more precisely. Finally, responses need to be carefully considered via a combination of climate mitigation to reduce the rise and adaptation for the residual rise in sea level. In particular, long-term strategic adaptation plans for the full range of possible sea-level rise (and other change) need to be widely developed.

· sea-level rise

· impacts

· adaptation

· protection

· retreat

· 2011 The Royal Society

Full Text

· Abstract 9 of 11Articles

Climate-induced population displacements in a 4°C+ world

Massive population displacements are now regularly presented as one of the most dramatic possible consequences of climate change. Current forecasts and projections show that regions that would be affected by such population movements are low-lying islands, coastal and deltaic regions, as well as sub-Saharan Africa. Such estimates, however, are usually based on a 2°C temperature rise. In the event of a 4°C+ warming, not only is it likely that climate-induced population movements will be more considerable, but also their patterns could be significantly different, as people might react differently to temperature changes that would represent a threat to their very survival. This paper puts forward the hypothesis that a greater temperature change would affect not only the magnitude of the associated population movements, but also—and above all—the characteristics of these movements, and therefore the policy responses that can address them. The paper outlines the policy evolutions that climate-induced displacements in a 4°C+ world would require.

· migration

· displacement

· climate change

· mobility

· adaptation

· 2011 The Royal Society

Full Text

· Abstract 10 of 11Articles

Rethinking adaptation for a 4°C world

With weakening prospects of prompt mitigation, it is increasingly likely that the world will experience 4°C and more of global warming. In such a world, adaptation decisions that have long lead times or that have implications playing out over many decades become more uncertain and complex. Adapting to global warming of 4°C cannot be seen as a mere extrapolation of adaptation to 2°C; it will be a more substantial, continuous and transformative process. However, a variety of psychological, social and institutional barriers to adaptation are exacerbated by uncertainty and long timeframes, with the danger of immobilizing decision-makers. In this paper, we show how complexity and uncertainty can be reduced by a systematic approach to categorizing the interactions between decision lifetime, the type of uncertainty in the relevant drivers of change and the nature of adaptation response options. We synthesize a number of issues previously raised in the literature to link the categories of interactions to a variety of risk-management strategies and tactics. Such application could help to break down some barriers to adaptation and both simplify and better target adaptation decision-making. The approach needs to be tested and adopted rapidly.

· adaptation

· uncertainty

· decision-making

· risk management

· complexity

· climate change

· 2011 The Royal Society

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Full Text

· Abstract 11 of 11Articles

The role of interactions in a world implementing adaptation and mitigation solutions to climate change

The papers in this volume discuss projections of climate change impacts upon humans and ecosystems under a global mean temperature rise of 4°C above preindustrial levels. Like most studies, they are mainly single-sector or single-region-based assessments. Even the multi-sector or multi-region approaches generally consider impacts in sectors and regions independently, ignoring interactions. Extreme weather and adaptation processes are often poorly represented and losses of ecosystem services induced by climate change or human adaptation are generally omitted. This paper addresses this gap by reviewing some potential interactions in a 4°C world, and also makes a comparison with a 2°C world. In a 4°C world, major shifts in agricultural land use and increased drought are projected, and an increased human population might increasingly be concentrated in areas remaining wet enough for economic prosperity. Ecosystem services that enable prosperity would be declining, with carbon cycle feedbacks and fire causing forest losses. There is an urgent need for integrated assessments considering the synergy of impacts and limits to adaptation in multiple sectors and regions in a 4°C world. By contrast, a 2°C world is projected to experience about one-half of the climate change impacts, with concomitantly smaller challenges for adaptation. Ecosystem services, including the carbon sink provided by the Earth’s forests, would be expected to be largely preserved, with much less potential for interaction processes to increase challenges to adaptation. However, demands for land and water for biofuel cropping could reduce the availability of these resources for agricultural and natural systems. Hence, a whole system approach to mitigation and adaptation, considering interactions, potential human and species migration, allocation of land and water resources and ecosystem services, will be important in either a 2°C or a 4°C world.

· climate change

· integrated assessment modelling

· adaptation

· extreme weather events

· ecosystem services

· biodiversity

· 2011 The Royal Society

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/gca?gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F20&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F45&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F67&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F85&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F99&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F117&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F137&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F161&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F182&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F196&gca=roypta%3B369%2F1934%2F217&submit=Get+All+Checked+Abstracts


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CLIMATE TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE: DECEMBER 4 2010

December 4, 2010 at 12:24 am | Posted in Earth, Ecology, Globalization, Research, Science & Technology, Third World | Leave a comment

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Climate Technology Initiative (CTI)

CTI Side Event:

Mobilizing private sector financing for

technology transfer- 4 December 20:15-21:45

kuroda@icett.or.jp

International Center for Environmental Technology

Transfer (ICETT)

Climate Change Info

Fri 12/03/10

Taiki Kuroda
CTI Programme Secretariat
International Center for Environmental Technology Transfer (ICETT)
3684-11 Sakura-cho, Yokkaichi, Mie 512-1211, Japan
Tel: +81-59-329-3500  Fax: +81-59-329-8115
Cell: +81-80-3289-4568
E-mail: kuroda@icett.or.jp
CTI website: http://www.climatetech.net/
CTI PFAN website: http://www.cti-pfan.net/

You are cordially invited to attend the Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) side event organized by the International Center for Environmental Technology Transfer (ICETT).

Mobilizing private sector financing for technology transfer
Saturday 4th December 2010  20:15-21:45
Room: Águila, Cancun Messe, Hall C

In order to supplement the scarce public resources available to finance developing country technology needs, CTI PFAN is successfully mobilizing private sector financing sources. The side event will showcase examples of activities in a broad range of developing countries focusing on Africa.

For further information, please refer to the attached programme.
Refreshments will be served after the side event.

Taiki Kuroda
CTI Programme Secretariat
International Center for Environmental Technology Transfer (ICETT)
3684-11 Sakura-cho, Yokkaichi, Mie 512-1211, Japan
Tel: +81-59-329-3500  Fax: +81-59-329-8115
Cell: +81-80-3289-4568
E-mail: kuroda@icett.or.jp
CTI website: http://www.climatetech.net/
CTI PFAN website: http://www.cti-pfan.net/

http://sids-l.iisd.org/ – IISD is pleased to announce the launch of SIDS Policy & Practice – A Knowledgebase on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States
– IISD Reporting Services environment and sustainable development policy professionals at http://www.iisd.ca/email/subscribe.htm

Climate Technology Initiative (CTI)

CTI Side Event: Mobilizing private sector financing for technology transfer- 4

December 20:15-21:45

kuroda@icett.or.jp

International Center for Environmental Technology Transfer (ICETT)

Climate Change Info

Fri 12/03/10

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