ASPECTS OF OLD SHANGHAI

July 29, 2011 at 6:26 pm | Posted in Asia, Books, China, History | Leave a comment

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Old Shanghai in the 20th century:

China’s first aeroplane – 1909

Shanghai Volunteer Corps

Anti-kidnapping Soc. – 1912

The Communist Party ‘s 1st congress

The 1927 Communist Purge

The Shanghai War, 1932

Anti-Japan demos, 1935

The Japanese War, 1937

August 14, 1937

Chungking Underground

Eat, Drink & be Merry … 

The 2nd World War, 1941

Orgy of Revenge – 1945

Capone’s armoured car, 1945

“No immediate threat”

The end

Cartoons of the day
Periodicals of the day
Quotable Quotes of the day
Excerpts from books and novels

New additions:

The Chinese Mind – Arthur Ransome
Pott history of Shanghai 1928(13-16)
Nitespot Namecards
Shanghai society? Snobbish? 1915
Sir Chaloner Alabaster
Wedding of Chiang Kai-shek and Soong Mei-ling
Pott history of Shanghai 1928(8)

Contents:
Introduction
Places
People
Cultures
19th century
20th century
Reading room
Old Maps
Gallery
Library

Business
Administration

More:

East India Trade – the Swedish Connection

History of China

http://www.earnshaw.com/shanghai-ed-india/tales/t-even20.htm

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BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JULY 27 AND JULY 29 2011: G20

July 29, 2011 at 11:15 am | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 27 and 29 July now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Fri 7/29/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 29 July 2011

now available on the BIS website

Jean-Claude Trichet: Interview with Le Point

Caleb M Fundanga: Developing Zambia’s Stock Exchange

Christian Noyer: The G20’s current challenges – combining new regulations and economic growth

27 July

Central bankers’ speeches for 27 July 2011

now available on the BIS website

Prasarn Trairatvorakul: Thailand’s economic outlook in 2011

Matthew Elderfield: The future of Irish banking

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 27 and 29 July now available‏

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Fri 7/29/11

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BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JULY 25 AND JULY 26 2011: GLOBAL FINANCIAL REFORM

July 26, 2011 at 12:16 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, Japan, Research | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 25 and 26 July now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Tue 7/26/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 26 July 2011

now available on the BIS website

Glenn Stevens: The cautious consumer

Masaaki Shirakawa: Japan’s economy and monetary policy

Hirohide Yamaguchi: Challenges to Japan’s economy and monetary policy after the Great Earthquake – preparations for uncertainties and strengthening of growth potential

Central bankers’ speeches for 25 July 2011

now available on the BIS website

Jean-Claude Trichet: Interview with the Süddeutsche Zeitung

Tiff Macklem: Global financial reform – maintaining the momentum

Malcolm Edey: General economic and financial environment in Australia

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at: http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 25 and 26 July now available

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Tue 7/26/11

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

July 25, 2011 at 2:14 pm | Posted in Development, Earth, Economics, Financial, Globalization, Third World, World-system | Leave a comment

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, TRADE TO TOP AGENDA

AS BAN VISITS FINLAND AND SWITZERLAND

UNNews UNNews@un.org

Mon, 11 Jul 2011

New York, Jul 11 2011

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT,TRADE TO TOP AGENDA AS BAN VISITS FINLAND AND SWITZERLAND

Sustainable development and global trade will be the focus of Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s visits to Finland and Switzerland later this week, his spokesperson announced today.

On Friday, Mr. Ban will meet with President Tarja Halonen of Finland, spokesperson Martin Nesirky told reporters in New York.

They will participate in a panel discussion about sustainable development in SuomiAreena, during which they will discuss the role of the UN in advancing the goals of sustainable development.

The discussions come as preparations continue for the Fourth UN Conference on Sustainable Development, or Rio+20, which will be held in the Brazilian city in June 2012.

After visiting Finland, the Secretary-General will travel to Geneva, where he will meet with President Micheline Calmy-Rey of Switzerland and attend the Third Global Aid for Trade Review of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

Aid for Trade aims to help developing countries, particularly least developed countries, develop the trade-related skills and infrastructure that is needed to implement and benefit from WTO agreements and to expand their trade.

The two-day review, which begins on 18 July, will provide an overview of what is – and is not – happening in the delivery of Aid for Trade, including current flows, existing gaps, and where improvements need to be made.

Jul 11 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, TRADE TO TOP AGENDA

AS BAN VISITS FINLAND AND SWITZERLAND

UNNews UNNews@un.org

Mon, 11 Jul 2011

EMERGING ECONOMIES FUEL RECOVERY AS GROWTH

REMAINS WEAK IN RICH COUNTRIES – UN

UNNews UNNews@un.org

Wed, 25 May 2011

New York, May 25 2011

EMERGING ECONOMIES FUEL RECOVERY AS GROWTH REMAINS WEAK IN RICH COUNTRIES – UN

Large economies in developing countries – mainly China, Brazil and India – continue to lead the global recovery, amid weaker performances in relatively richer nations, where concerns over huge public debt have led to austerity measures that have dampened growth prospects, according to a new United Nationshttp://www.un.org/en/development/desa/policy/wesp/index.shtml report.

The mid-year issue of the World Economic Situation and Prospects (WESP), released today, points out that the outlook for growth is moderating in even the biggest economies in Asia and Latin America because of several increasingly pressing concerns.

Those concerns include rising inflation, emerging domestic asset price bubbles, and upward pressure on exchange rates, fuelled in part by large capital inflows.

The world gross product (WGP) is expected to grow by 3.3 per cent this year and 3.6 per cent in 2012, only a slight upward adjustment from the forecasts released in the WESP 2011 at the beginning of the year.

Unemployment in developed economies fell in some countries, but the number of people out of work for six months or longer continues to rise, according to the report, prepared by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), UN Conference for Trade and Development (UNCTAD), and the five UN regional social and economic commissions.

Unemployment also fell as a result of many jobless persons stopping their search for work, the report notes.

Among the economies in transition, employment improved in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), but remained weak in South-Eastern Europe. Employment levels generally have returned to above pre-crisis levels in developing countries, especially in East Asia, according to the report.

At current levels of economic growth, it would four to five years before employment rates revert to pre-crisis levels in developed countries, according to the report.

The devastating earthquake and tsunami and subsequent nuclear crisis in Japan in March shook world financial markets and disrupted important global supply chains, while the recent political unrest in the Middle East and North Africa has led to a surge in oil prices. Global prices of food and other primary commodities have also soared.

The report warns that global recovery is still fragile and could suffer setbacks if public debt problems and continued financial sector fragility in developed economies are not adequately addressed and global commodity prices continue to surge, triggering further belt-tightening.

In the outlook for the rest of 2011 and for 2012, WESP predicts that more countries are expected to further unwind both monetary and fiscal support measures.

The report suggests a number of global policy interventions to address the risks.

They include developed countries avoiding the temptation to prematurely tighten fiscal policies. Those policies should instead be redesigned to strengthen impact on employment and promote structural change for more sustainable economic growth over the medium- and longer-term.

For both developed and developing countries, a prudent policy would be to target public investments with a view to alleviating infrastructure bottlenecks that hamper growth prospects and tackling environmental challenges, including by accelerating the transformation of the energy sector to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and investing in sustainable food agriculture.

The report urges ensuring that sufficient resources are made available to developing countries, especially those with limited resources and which face huge development needs. The resources will be needed, in particular, to accelerate progress towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and for investment in sustainable growth. It also calls for ways to achieve effective policy coordination among major economies.

May 25 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

EMERGING ECONOMIES FUEL RECOVERY AS GROWTH

REMAINS WEAK IN RICH COUNTRIES – UN

http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/policy/wesp/index.shtml

UNNews UNNews@un.org

Wed, 25 May 2011

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BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JULY 21 AND JULY 22 2011: ISLAMIC FINANCE

July 25, 2011 at 11:47 am | Posted in Development, Economics, Financial, Globalization, Islam, World-system | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 21 and 22 July now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Mon 7/25/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 22 July 2011

now available on the BIS website

Ben S Bernanke: The Dodd-Frank Act

Brian P Sack: The SOMA portfolio at $2.654 trillion

Central bankers’ speeches for 21 July 2011

now available on the BIS website

Zeti Akhtar Aziz: Enhancing financial linkages towards economic prosperity

Halim Alamsyah: Some critical issues concerning the sustainability of Islamic finance development – Indonesia perspective

Mark Carney: Summary of the latest Monetary Policy Report

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at:

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 21 and 22 July now available‏

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Mon 7/25/11 
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“GROWTH RECURRING”: ERIC JONES BOOK

July 21, 2011 at 3:34 pm | Posted in Books, Development, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History | Leave a comment

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Growth Recurring: Economic Change in World History

E. L. Jones (Author)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“He has supplemented his expertise in European economic history by reading widely in Asian history, ancient and modern….Jones’s style is both delightful and lapidary. He strikes innumerable sparks with challenging assertions on almost every page….His new book is as thought-provoking as The Economic Miracle–not least where it contradicts its predecessor.”–American Historical Review
“Bold and stimulating.”–Journal of Asian Studies

Product Description

This study concerns the conflict in world history between economic growth and political greed. E.L. Jones, author of the groundbreaking The European Miracle, proposes two fundamentally new frameworks. One replaces industrial revolution or great discontinuity as the source of change and challenges the reader to accept early periods and non-Western societies as vital to understanding the growth process. It shows that growth occurred independently in Sung China and Japan as well as in Europe. The second framework offers a new explanation in which tendencies for growth were omnipresent but were usually suppressed. The “obstacles to growth” and their subsequent erosion is reviewed, providing an explanation of the modern world economy in which growth has recurred and East Asia has taken a prominent place.

Product Details:

  • Hardcover: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • May 5, 1988
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198283008
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198283003

Eirc L. Jones (author of the much discusses book on The European Miracle, 1981) discusses world history from an economical perspective. By training he is an economist. The basic concepts are intensive economic growth (innovation) and extensive economic growth (more of the same). According the Jones extensive growth must develop into intensive growth at some point in time. You can only have so many workers or machines in your factory before it becomes economically useless (law of diminishing returns). China during the Sung (or Song) dynasty (960 – 1279 AD or CE) experienced extensive growth and reached unprecedented levels of economic welfare, commercialization (market economy) and consumerism. Industrial output of iron during the Sung period was not reached again until the late 18th century in Britain. But China never experienced a so called Industrial Revolution like Britain or other Western European countries. Why not? This ‘frustration’ (according to Jones) is explained by referring to values (culture), institutions (law), state action, and military conquest. This is a thought provoking book, but recent research on China (Pomeranz and Bin Wong) dismiss Jones’s answers.
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BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JULY 20 2011: CENTRAL BANKING

July 20, 2011 at 3:10 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 20 July now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Wed 7/20/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 20 July 2011

now available on the BIS website

Andrew G Haldane: The race to zero

Charles Bean: Central banking then and now

Jean-Claude Trichet: Interview with Postimees, Hospodárske noviny and Delo

Jean-Claude Trichet: Interview with the Financial Times Deutschland

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at:

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 20 July now available‏

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Wed 7/20/11 

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POLITICAL ECONOMY CLUB: LONDON 1821

July 19, 2011 at 12:16 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Philosophy, Research, United Kingdom | Leave a comment

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Political Economy Club

The Political Economy Club was founded by James Mill[1] and a circle of friends in 1821 in London, for the purpose of coming to an agreement on the fundamental principles of political economy. David Ricardo, James Mill, Thomas Malthus (the only one holding an academic post at the time), and Robert Torrens were among the original luminaries.[2]

In the early 19th century there were no academic societies or professional associations for economists. The Political Economy Club was a way to establish a scientific community, test ideas, and provide peer review for their work.[3]

Discussions

The participants soon found substantial difficulties in formulating and reaching agreement on their fundamental propositions. Ricardo felt that none of their views was safe from criticism. Reflecting on their theoretical discussions in 1823, Ricardo privately expressed his famous opinion about the “non-existence of any measure of absolute value.”[4]

Participants

Ricardo, Malthus, James Mill, Torrens, Thomas Tooke, John Stuart Mill, John Ramsey McCulloch, Nassau Senior, John Elliott Cairnes, Henry Fawcett, William Newmarch, Samuel Jones-Loyd, 1st Baron Overstone, William Newmarch, Jane Marcet,[5] George Ward Norman, William Blake, and Jean-Baptiste Say.

Later: William Stanley Jevons, Thomas Edward Cliffe Leslie, Walter Coulson, Robert Mushet, Henry Parnell , James Pennington, John Horsley Palmer, and Thomas Perronet Thompson. Others were drawn from outside the ranks of economists, including G. G. de Larpent, George John Shaw-Lefevre, John Abel Smith, Henry Warburton, Lord Althorp, William Whitmore, W. B. Baring, Poulett Thomson, Sir Robert Wilmot-Horton, Lord Monteagle, Charles Hay Cameron, J. D. Hume, George Grote, James Morrison, Edwin Chadwick, Sir Robert Giffen, Charles Buller, and Sir William Clay.

Significant elections after 1840 include Robert Lowe, Sir G. C. Lewis, Rowland Hill, Stafford Northcote, George J. Goschen, William Ewart Gladstone, and W. E. Forster.[6]

Current meetings

Some current members of the society are David Willetts, Peter Jay, Charles Dumas and Tim Congdon. The Club now meets on a monthly basis in the Royal Automobile Club to hear papers presented by members of the club and a discussion over dinner.

References

1.                              http://cepa.newschool.edu/het/profiles/jamesmill.htm James Mill, 1773-1836

2.                              Elie Halévy, The Growth of Philosophic Radicalism, tr. Mary Morris. Boston, Beacon Press, 1955, p. 343.

3.                              http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s7829.html D. P. O’Brien, The Classical Economists Revisited. Princeton University Press, 2004.

4.                              Ricardo to Malthus, August 15, 1823. Quoted by Halevy, Ibid., p. 352.

5.                              http://www2.hmc.edu/~evans/rpas.htm Gary R. Evans, Humanities 2 “Classics of Economic Thought”

6.                              http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s7829.html D. P. O’Brien, The Classical Economists Revisited. Princeton University Press, 2004.

Archives

Publications

  • J. R. McCulloch, Early English Tracts on Commerce. London: Political Economy Club (1856); Cambridge University Press, 1954.
  • Political Economy Club, Revised Report of the Proceedings at the Dinner of 31 May 1876, Held in Celebration of the Hundredth Year of the Publication of the “Wealth of Nations” (London: Longmans, Green, Reader & Dyer (1876).
  • Political Economy Club : founded in London, 1821 : minutes of proceedings, 1899–1920, roll of members and questions discussed, 1821-1920 with documents bearing on the history of the club. Macmillan and Co., (1921)

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FINANCIAL STABILITY BOARD: BASEL

July 17, 2011 at 7:25 am | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research | Leave a comment

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Financial Stability Board

The Financial Stability Board (FSB) is an international body that monitors and makes recommendations about the global financial system. It was established after the 2009 G-20 London summit in April 2009 as a successor to the Financial Stability Forum. The Board includes all G-20 major economies, FSF members, and the European Commission. It is based in Basel, Switzerland.[1]

Background

The Financial Stability Board emerged from the Financial Stability Forum (FSF), a group of finance ministries, central bankers, and international financial bodies. The FSF was founded in 1999 to promote international financial stability, after discussions among Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors of the G7 countries, and a study which they commissioned.[2] The FSF facilitated discussion and co-operation on supervision and surveillance of financial institutions, transactions and events. FSF was managed by a small secretariat housed at the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland.[3] The FSF membership included about a dozen nations who participate through their central banks, financial ministries and departments, and securities regulators, including: the United States, Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Canada, Australia, the Netherlands and several other industrialized economies as well as several international economic organizations.[4] At the G20 summit on November 15, 2008 it was agreed that the membership of the FSF will be expanded to include emerging economies, such as China. The 2009 G-20 London summit decided to establish a successor to the FSF, the Financial Stability Board. The FSB includes members of the G20 who were not members of FSF.[5]

The Financial Stability Forum met in Rome on 28–29 March 2008 in connection with the Bank for International Settlements. Members discussed current challenges in financial markets, and various policy options to address them from this point forward.[6] At this meeting, the FSF discussed a report to be delivered to G7 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors in April 2008. it identifies key weaknesses underlying current financial turmoil, and recommends actions to improve market and institutional resilience. The FSF discussed work underway at the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) with regard to sovereign wealth funds (SWFs). The IMF is working closely with SWFs to identify a set of voluntary best practice guidelines, and is focusing on the governance, institutional arrangements and transparency of SWFs.[6] On April 12, 2008 the FSF delivered a report to the G7 Finance Ministers which details out its recommendations for enhancing the resilience of the financial markets and financial institutions. These are in five areas:

  • Strengthened prudential oversight of capital, liquidity and risk management
  • Enhancing transparency and valuation
  • Changes in the role and uses of credit ratings
  • Strengthening the authorities’ responsiveness to risks
  • Robust arrangements for dealing with stress in the financial system [1]

Overview

The FSB represents the G-20 leaders’ first major international institutional innovation. Secretary of the US Treasury Tim Geithner has described it as “in effect, a fourth pillar” of the architecture of global economic governance. The FSB has been assigned a number of important tasks, working alongside the IMF, World Bank, and WTO. Chairman of the board is the Italian Mario Draghi, current Governor of Banca d’Italia, the Italian central bank.[7]

Financial Stability Board

The Financial Stability Board (FSB) is an international body that monitors and makes recommendations about the global financial system. It was established after the 2009 G-20 London summit in April 2009 as a successor to the Financial Stability Forum. The Board includes all G-20 major economies, FSF members, and the European Commission. It is based in Basel, Switzerland.[1]

References
1.                            
 http://www.financialstabilityboard.org/about/contact.htm
2.                            
 Genesis of the FSF, FSF website.
3.                            
 fsforum.org, main website.
4.                            
 FSF:Who we are.
5.                            
 http://www.fsforum.org/press/pr_090312b.pdf
6.                            
 a b Financial Stability Forum meets in Rome, 29 March 2008, Press release, Website of Bank for International Settlements
7.                            
 G20 London Summit, Leaders’ Statement 2 April 2009.

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

July 16, 2011 at 2:03 pm | Posted in Development, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, World-system | Leave a comment

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT VITAL TO

PROTECT ECONOMIES AND ENVIRONMENT – BAN‏

UNNews (UNNews@un.org)

Fri 7/15/11

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT VITAL TO PROTECT ECONOMIES 
AND ENVIRONMENT – BAN

New York, Jul 15 2011 

 Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today reiterated that humanity must give sustainable development greater attention, saying that the current model of using resources was putting a strain on ecosystems and exacerbating global warming, even as climate change remained a growing threat to people and economies worldwide. “Our old model of growth is not only obsolete, it is also dangerous,” Mr. Ban said, speaking at a forum on sustainable development in Finland, where he also held a meeting with President Tarja Halonen. He called for a revolution in favour of sustainable development in which a green economy is driven by business, supported by governments, and embraced by the people. “Sustainable development is the top priority of the United Nations and the international community. We have to work to address climate change, the food crisis, energy shortages, water scarcity, global health, gender empowerment – all are interconnected,” Mr. Ban “http://www.un.org/apps/sg/offthecuff.asp?nid=1883” told reporters after his meeting with the President. In response to a question on the UN’s response to the humanitarian crisis caused by the severe drought in the Horn of Africa, the Secretary-General said he was deeply concerned about situation. “We have to help them, the people in Kenya, Somalia and other countries. Ethiopia, they are suffering a great deal because of this [drought]. I have convened a task force on global food security issues, and we are now mobilizing all necessary support. We have appealed for $1.6 billion,” said Mr. Ban.

Jul 15 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT VITAL TO

PROTECT ECONOMIES AND ENVIRONMENT – BAN‏

http://www.un.org/apps/sg/offthecuff.asp?nid=188

UNNews (UNNews@un.org)

Fri 7/15/11

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