JOHN STACKHOUSE BOOK “OUT OF POVERTY”

March 9, 2011 at 12:02 am | Posted in Books, Development, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History | Leave a comment

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Out of Poverty

Author: John Stackhouse

From East Timor to Timbuktu, John Stackhouse has met and lived with hundreds of the world’s poor. When he set out on this journey in 1991, he was certain that the new age of global markets and economic reforms would end decades of extreme hardship in the developing world. But as the nineties rolled on, he found poverty still entrenched in dozens…  more » of countries — except where people had some control over their lives. In an intriguing blend of travel writing and analysis, moving portraits and comic tales, Stackhouse tells the personal stories of some of the world’s poorest people and shows how they are going to end global poverty in the next century. He provides haunting details of lives and communities destroyed by misplaced aid and government interventions. But more importantly he shows how individuals are finding the creativity and means to make their own lives better — from women in the remote shea-nut forests of West Africa who are learning to bypass their corrupt government to cash in on rich international markets to a trade union of prostitutes in Calcutta that is actively demanding basic human rights.

Stackhouse’s journey proves that poverty is not an inevitable part of the human condition but a direct result of human actions. Poverty is something that people can remedy…

About this Book

In an intriguing blend of travel writing and analysis, moving portraits and comic tales, Stackhouse tells the personal stories of some of the world’s poorest people and shows how they are going to end global poverty in the next century. He provides haunting details of lives and communities destroyed by misplaced aid and government interventions. But more importantly he shows how individuals are finding the creativity and means to make their own lives better. Time and again, Stackhouse sees what happens when people have a say in the fate of their schools, forests, fields and governments: they do what no development agency or government mega-project has been able to achieve. They thrive. They may continue to be humble but they are no longer desperate. John Stackhouse’s eight-year journey among the poor leads us away from despair. Poverty, he writes, is not an inevitable part of the human condition but a direct result of human actions – and something that can be remedied.

Review Quotes

“Stackhouse is a great storyteller— with a sharp eye for detail and a light touch of humour.”—The Globe and Mail

“The important thing about Stackhouse is that he does not spend his time with the high and mighty in their statehouses. Instead, he treks out to villages and forests, or inward to city slums, to unfold the real lives of the real people who lie behind all those numbing statistics on poverty and deprivation.”—The Gazette (Montreal)

“”What is not surprising is that Stackhouse describes many situations in which well-intentioned aid from wealthy countries, including Canada, is ineffective at best or at its worst exacerbates already bad situations….I’m not the only one who thinks he is the best reporter in Canada, a national treasure.” — Waterloo Record

“…[Stackhouse] is no Jan Morris, chock-full of purple passages. He uses simple words that suit the village people out of whom he coaxes their life stores, and has a sharp eye (and doubtless a bulging notebook) for detail and a light touch of humour.” –Clyde Sanger, The Globe and Mail

“Stackhouse is a gifted reporter. His recountings of the daily grind that’s the lot of the poor capture not only physical details but also the moral struggles that animate and plague their lives.” —Winnipeg Free Press

“…and provides a view of the people, politics and environment goes beyond the every-day news flashes and appeals for aid….If you are a travel-writing enthusiast and enjoy a good tourist’s tale, Out of Poverty is well worth the effort.” —The Vancouver Sun

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

THE VILLAGE I
1.
A Man with a Title, a Widow with No Name
2. “They fear she will start saying ‘No'”
3. Dalchand: Father of the Bride

AFRICA
4. Desert Rats
5. Big Men and Little Dreams
6. Daddy George
7. A Despot’s Delight
8. The Shea-Nut Gatherers
9. Mama Benz

THE VILLAGE II
10. Where the Spirit Dwells
11. Third Child, Never
12. “Slight pain is inevitable”

BANGLADESH
13. Dr. Zaf
14. Two Sisters, One River
15. The Shrimp Wars

THE VILLAGE III
16. The Sikhs
17. City Lights
18. A Village Votes, a Nation Bends

INDIA
19. The Forest Dwellers
20. “God, why did you make us girls?”
21. The Educated Man

INDONESIA
22. Gateway to Hell

THE VILLAGE IV
23. Class War

CONCLUSION

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

INDEX

About this Author

Few foreign journalists have travelled to more villages or remote districts than John Stackhouse. For eight years, he was based in New Dehli as The Globe and Mail‘s development issues reporter but spent much of his time living with poor farmers, fisherman, lepers and slum-dwellers, travelling by third-class rail through India or by boat through Borneo. He has won five National Newspaper Awards – one for his eye-opening account of life for the homeless on Toronto streets – A National Magazine Award and an Amnesty International prize for foreign reporting.

Out of Poverty

Author: John Stackhouse

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