“FINANCIAL TIMES” ARTICLE BY SAMUEL BRITTAN

August 31, 2010 at 1:29 pm | Posted in Economics, Eurozone, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, United Kingdom | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

New Samuel Brittan article:

The return of beggar-my-neighbour policy

The Financial Times 27/07/10

Andrew Heavens (andrew.heavens@gmail.com)

Mon 8/30/10

The return of beggar-my-neighbour policy

The academic name for the economic policy into which the British prime minister has stumbled is “mercantilism”. According to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, this is “the economic theory and practice common in Europe from the 16th to the 18th centuries that promoted government regulation of a nation’s economy for the purpose of augmenting state power at the expense of rival national powers”. Among its doctrines was that the trade balance must be favourable, meaning an excess of exports over imports…The best name [for modern mercantilism] is “beggar-my-neighbour” economics. This was coined by the leftwing Cambridge economist Joan Robinson – no market fundamentalist she. By this she meant that because governments were unwilling or unable to promote output and employment by domestic means they had to resort to trying to promote it at the expense of other countries.
http://samuelbrittan.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=f3d103dd062d8e2eb1704a4f9&id=a93f37461d&e=66c71111bc

New Samuel Brittan article: The return of beggar-my-neighbour policy

The Financial Times 27/07/10

Andrew Heavens (andrew.heavens@gmail.com)

http://samuelbrittan.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=f3d103dd062d8e2eb1704a4f9&id=a93f37461d&e=66c71111bc

Mon 8/30/10

banknotes.jpg

CLIMATE CHANGE: GLOBAL COOPERATION

August 31, 2010 at 9:32 am | Posted in Asia, Development, Earth, Ecology, Research, World-system | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

INCREASED COOPERATION VITAL TO TACKLING CLIMATE

CHANGE IN PACIFIC BAN SAYS

New York Aug 4 2010

INCREASED COOPERATION VITAL TO TACKLING CLIMATE CHANGE

IN PACIFIC BAN SAYS

UNNews UNNews@un.org

Wed 4 Aug 2010

Closer international cooperation is necessary to help Pacific island nations combat the impact of climate change, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said today, pledging the United Nations commitment to mitigating the problem.

No other challenge in the Pacific is as urgent and potentially life-threatening as climate change, warned Mr. Ban in a message to the leaders of the Pacific Islands Forum, being held in Port Vila, Vanuatu.

The message was delivered by Thomas Stelzer, Assistant Secretary-General for Policy Coordination and Inter-Agency Affairs of the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/index.shtml?utm_source=redirect&utm_medium=online&utm_campaign=redirect DESA).

In his message the Secretary-General encouraged Pacific nations to maintain engagement at the highest level with the UN High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing. Mr. Ban established the group in February to study potential sources of revenue that can be used to help developing countries carry out activities to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

This is particularly important, Mr. Ban stressed, because a summit on the UNs Millennium Development Goals (“http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/ MDGs) is slated for mid-September at UN Headquarters in New York. The gathering will start our final push for the goals over the next five years, Mr. Ban said.

The MDGs are a set of enumerated and time-bound targets for tackling social and economic ills such as poverty, illiteracy and HIV/AIDS, all by 2015.

Crucial to achieving MDG 7, ensuring environmental sustainability, is the Advisory Groups effort to raise $100 billion per year of aid to developing countries by 2020. The aid would fund initiatives that alleviate the impact of climate change, which last Decembers Copenhagen summit identified as having the most immediate impact on Pacific island States.

In recent years leaders from the region have warned the Security Council that climate change is causing more intense cyclones, a rise in sea levels, more king tides and increasingly frequent outbreaks of vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever.

The Secretary-General pointed out in his message today that the situation in the region is especially important to the entire international community because resettling whole populations outside national boundaries is under consideration.

Meanwhile, Mr. Ban also urged an inclusive process to return Fiji to civilian constitutional rule as soon as possible, noting that stability in Fiji is significant to preserving the rule of law and good governance in the region.

Aug 4 2010

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

INCREASED COOPERATION VITAL TO TACKLING CLIMATE

CHANGE IN PACIFIC BAN SAYS

New York Aug 4 2010

INCREASED COOPERATION VITAL TO TACKLING CLIMATE

CHANGE IN PACIFIC BAN SAYS

UNNews UNNews@un.org

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

Wed 4 Aug 2010

banknotes.jpg

“NOT ALL FINANCIAL REGULATION IS GLOBAL”

August 31, 2010 at 8:32 am | Posted in Economics, Eurozone, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, World-system | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

Bruegel Publication Alert – Not all financial regulation is global

BRUEGELPUBLICATIONALERT

Not all financial regulation is global

Policy Brief by Nicolas Véron and Stéphane Rottier

on behalf of Bruegel (bruegel@bruegel.org)

Tue 8/31/10

The Financial Crisis has intensified the focus on financial regulation at global level, placing it at the top of the G20 agenda. However, global convergence is made more difficult by financial multipolarity, meaning the increased diversity of political preferences reflecting the rise of emerging economies, and financial reregulation, or the trend towards stronger regulation of financial systems to buttress financial stability.

In this Policy Brief Nicolas Véron and Stéphane Rottier suggest policy priorities for global leaders in a context where global harmonisation of all aspects of financial regulation cannot be achieved, but action is needed at global level to prevent fragmentation of capital markets.

This paper is complemented by a Policy Contribution, which assesses the implementation and follow-up of the 47 action items included in the G20’s agenda since its first summit in Washington in 2008.

[Dowload Policy Brief]

[Dowload Policy Contribution]

Bruegel Publication Alert – Not all financial regulation is global

BRUEGELPUBLICATIONALERT

Not all financial regulation is global

Policy Brief by Nicolas Véron and Stéphane Rottier

on behalf of Bruegel (bruegel@bruegel.org)

Tue 8/31/10

banknotes.jpg

MICROFINANCE ACTIVITIES: BIS

August 30, 2010 at 10:34 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, Research | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

Press release:

Microfinance activities and the Core Principles –

Basel Committee issues final paper

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Publications, Service (Publications@bis.org)

Mon 8/30/10

The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision today issued the final version of its paper entitled Microfinance activities and the Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision. The Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision (the Core Principles) are the global de facto standard for sound prudential regulation and supervision of banks.

Mr Nout Wellink, Chairman of the Basel Committee and President of the Netherlands Bank, noted that “given the unique characteristics of microfinance and the range of practices on regulating and supervising this line of business, the guidance will assist supervisors in applying the Core Principles in a manner that is commensurate with the type, complexity and size of depository microfinance activities conducted in their jurisdictions”.

Besides illustrating the general applicability of the Core Principles to the supervision of microfinance activities, the paper highlights key differences from conventional retail banking. Recognising the distinct regulatory challenges and the broader policy goals faced by supervisors engaged in overseeing microfinance activities, the supervisory guidance, as set out in the paper, is intended to point out areas where some degree of flexibility in implementing the Core Principles to microfinance supervision is appropriate. Such a tailored approach will enable countries to strike the right balance between the risks posed by microfinance and the supervisory costs as well as the role of microfinance in fostering financial inclusion.

In developing the guidance, the Committee reviewed the range of supervisory practices and approaches in countries from different regions and with different income levels. A comprehensive view of these practices on regulating and supervising microfinance activities is also included in the paper.

About the Basel Committee

The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision provides a forum for regular cooperation on banking supervisory matters. It seeks to promote and strengthen supervisory and risk management practices globally. The Committee comprises representatives from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong SAR, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States.

The Committee’s Secretariat is based at the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland.

Communications,
Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Press release:

Microfinance activities and the Core Principles –

Basel Committee issues final paper

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Publications, Service (Publications@bis.org)

Website: www.bis.org

Mon 8/30/10

banknotes.jpg

CLIMATE CHANGE REVIEW

August 30, 2010 at 3:07 pm | Posted in Earth, Ecology, Globalization, Research, Science & Technology | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

UN-BACKED CLIMATE BODY SAYS INDEPENDENT REVIEW

WILL STRENGTHEN ITS WORK

New York Aug 30 2010

UNNews UNNews@un.org

Mon 30 Aug 2010

UN-BACKED CLIMATE BODY SAYS INDEPENDENT REVIEW WILL STRENGTHEN ITS WORK

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and the head of the United Nations-backed panel tasked with preparing scientific reports on the impact of climate change today welcomed the findings of an independent review which called for major changes in management and procedures to enable the group to strengthen the quality of its assessments.

In March Mr. Ban and Rajendra Pachauri, the chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), requested the review amid intense public debate about the science of climate change, as well as questions over the accuracy of the panels reports.

The report we are releasing today identifies and recommends fundamental reforms to IPCC’s management structure, Robbert Dijkgraaf, co-chair of the InterAcademy Council (IAC) and head of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, told a news conference at UN Headquarters in New York.

The IPCC needs to strengthen its procedures to handle ever-larger and increasingly complex climate assessments as well as the more intense public scrutiny coming from a world grappling with how best to respond to climate change, he added.

In 2007, the Nobel Peace Prize-winning IPCC issued its landmark Fourth Assessment Report, which found the warming of the climate is outpacing natural variability, driven largely by human activity. The panels credibility came into question after revelations that the report contained some mistakes, including over the rate of Himalayan glacier melt.

The IAC, a scientific organization bringing together experts from around the world, makes a number of recommendations to strengthen the IPCCs management structure, including establishing an executive committee to act on the panels behalf and ensure that an ongoing decision-making capability is maintained.

To enhance its credibility and independence, the executive committee should include individuals from outside the IPCC or even outside the climate science community. The IPCC should also appoint an executive director to lead the Secretariat, handle day-to-day operations, and speak on behalf of the panel, the IAC stated.

In addition, it recommended that the IPCC chair and the proposed executive director be limited to the term of one assessment, and that a rigorous conflict-of-interest policy be applied to senior IPCC leadership and all authors, review editors, and staff responsible for report content.

We hope that today’s report will help the IPCC move forward in a stronger, more transparent manner as it carries out future climate change assessments, which are so critical in helping the world understand and prepare for and respond to climate change, said Mr. Dijkgraaf.

Mr. Ban welcomed the review, and urged the 194 member governments of the IPCC to study it carefully and take appropriate action as soon as possible.

Given the gravity of the climate challenge, the Secretary-General believes it is vital that the world receives the best possible climate assessments through an IPCC that operates at the highest levels of professionalism, objectivity, responsiveness and transparency, his spokesperson said in a statement.

The Secretary-General firmly maintains that the fundamental science on climate change remains sound. He continues to support the conclusions of the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC, which have been repeatedly upheld and endorsed by numerous professional review boards across the globe, the statement added.

Mr. Pachauri called the recommendations forward-looking and said that IPCC members will carefully review them at the panels plenary meeting, which will be held in October in Busan, Republic of Korea.

We already have the highest confidence in the science behind our assessments. Were now pleased to receive recommendations on how to further strengthen our own policies and procedures.

The head of the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), which along with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) co-hosts the IPCC, said todays report reaffirms the integrity, importance and validity of the panels work while recognizing areas for improvement.

These recommendations underscore that the IPCC remains the premier body for undertaking the risk assessment needed in such a complex field where knowledge especially in respect to likely regional impacts remains imperfect and where new knowledge is constantly being generated, Executive Director Achim Steiner said in a statement.

He added that with the fundamental science underpinning the IPCCs assessment reports not in doubt, and clear recommendations on how to move forward with regard to the panels administration, the international community must move beyond the current paralysis in developing an effective response to climate change.

The IPCC is currently preparing to start work on the Fifth Assessment Report, scheduled to be finalized in 2014.

Aug 30 2010

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

UN-BACKED CLIMATE BODY SAYS INDEPENDENT REVIEW

WILL STRENGTHEN ITS WORK

New York Aug 30 2010

UNNews UNNews@un.org

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

Mon 30 Aug 2010

banknotes.jpg

BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS “BIS REVIEW NO. 110”: BERNANKE ON ECONOMIC OUTLOOK

August 30, 2010 at 12:30 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, USA | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

BIS Review

Bank for International Settlements

BIS Review No 110 available

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Publications, Service (Publications@bis.org)

Mon 8/30/10

Please find BIS Review No 110 attached as an Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file. Alternatively, you can access this BIS Review on the Bank for International Settlements’ website by clicking on http://www.bis.org/review/index.htm.

What’s included?

BIS Review No 110 (30 August 2010)

Ben S Bernanke: The economic outlook and monetary policy

Choongsoo Kim: The Korean economic outlook and policy initiatives for the course ahead

Sada Reddy: Economic contribution of tourism – the way forward

Brian Wynter: Financial literacy for Jamaica

John Murray: Re-examining Canada’s monetary policy framework – recent research and outstanding issues

Claudio Borio: Implementing a macroprudential framework – blending boldness and realism

e-mail press@bis.org

BIS Review

Bank for International Settlements

BIS Review No 110 available

http://www.bis.org/review/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Publications, Service (Publications@bis.org)

Mon 8/30/10

banknotes.jpg

“HISTORY AT THE LIMIT OF WORLD-HISTORY”: RANAJIT GUHA BOOK

August 29, 2010 at 11:14 am | Posted in Globalization, History, India, Philosophy, World-system | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

guhahistorybook.jpg

History at the Limit of World-History

Ranajit Guha

The past is not just, as has been famously said, another country with foreign customs: it is a contested and colonized terrain. Indigenous histories have been expropriated, eclipsed, sometimes even wholly eradicated, in the service of imperialist aims buttressed by a distinctly Western philosophy of history.

Ranajit Guha, perhaps the most influential figure in postcolonial and subaltern studies at work today, offers a critique of such historiography by taking issue with the Hegelian concept of World-history. That concept, he contends, reduces the course of human history to the amoral record of states and empires, great men and clashing civilizations. It renders invisible the quotidian experience of ordinary people and casts off all that came before it into the nether-existence known as “Prehistory.”

On the Indian subcontinent, Guha believes, this Western way of looking at the past was so successfully insinuated by British colonization that few today can see clearly its ongoing and pernicious influence. He argues that to break out of this habit of mind and go beyond the Eurocentric and statist limit of World-history historians should learn from literature to make their narratives doubly inclusive: to extend them in scope not only to make room for the pasts of the so-called peoples without history but to address the historicality of everyday life as well. Only then, as Guha demonstrates through an examination of Rabindranath Tagore’s critique of historiography, can we recapture a more fully human past of “experience and wonder.”

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A new book by Ranajit Guha is both an important event for South Asian Studies and a significant occasion for the humanities….This is a deeply stirring work.”Homi Bhabha

“Guha’s works have deeply influenced not only the writing of subcontinental history but also historical investigations elsewhere, as well as cultural studies, literary theories, and social analyses across the world.” Amartya Sen

“Guha has been one of those rare creative spirits whose works continue to light our path towards this common humanity by honestly exploring our historical differences.” — Haider A. Khan, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa & the Middle East

“…the Tagore essay…is a gem and Guha’s eloquence usefully prods every reader to rethink his/her methodical toolkit.” — Gabriel Paquette, Itinerario

“Combining acute theoretical and political insight with empirical substance and prescription for enriching historical practice, this is an exemplary postmodern intervention.” — Patrick Finney, Journal of Contemporary History

“This book is definitely worth a read for those interested in questions pertaining to everyday life and also in recent postcolonial efforts to rethink the practices of disciplinary history.” — Bernardo A. Michael, Journal of World History

Product Description

The past is not just, as has been famously said, another country with foreign customs: it is a contested and colonized terrain. Indigenous histories have been expropriated, eclipsed, sometimes even wholly eradicated, in the service of imperialist aims buttressed by a distinctly Western philosophy of history. Guha offers a critique of such historiography by taking issue with the Hegelian concept of World-history.

Product Details:

· Paperback: 128 pages

· Publisher: Columbia University Press

· August 15 2003

· Language: English

· ISBN-10: 0231124198

· ISBN-13: 978-0231124195

Title History at the limit of world-history

Author Ranajit Guha

Edition reprint

Publisher Oxford University Press 2003

ISBN0 19566485X, 9780195664850

Length 116 pages

Subjects Historiography History World histor

banknotes.jpg

“THE IDEA OF INDIA”: SUNIL KHILNANI BOOK

August 29, 2010 at 7:58 am | Posted in Asia, Books, Development, Globalization, History, India | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

indiaideabook.jpg

The Idea of India

Sunil Khilnani; With a New Introduction by the Author
Farrar, Straus and Giroux Paperbacks June 1999
ISBN 13: 978-0-374-52591-0, ISBN 10: 0-374-52591-9
5 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches, 288 pages

The key book on India in the postnuclear era, with a new Introduction by the author. Our appreciation of the importance of India can only increase in light of the recent revelations of its nuclear capabilities. Sunil Khilnani’s exciting, timely study addresses the paradoxes and ironies of this, the world’s largest democracy. Throughout his penetrating, provocative work, he illuminates this fundamental issue: Can the original idea of India survive its own successes?

Praise

“A splendid-and timely-book . . . Spirited, combative and insight-filled . . . Khilnani has woven a rich analysis of contemporary India and its evolution since indepence. I am inclined to agree with [him] on the robustness and staying power of the secular idea of India.” —Amartya Sen, The Times Literary Supplement

“A masterful rebuttal to all cultural romantics and religious chauvinists . . . [A] splendid book about definitions of the Indian nation.” –Ian Buruma, The New York Review of Books

“Especially brilliant is Khilnani’s attempt to understand the changing nature of India by studying its urban constructs.” –Chitra Divakaruni, Los Angeles Times Book Review

About the Author(s)

Sunil Khilnani

Sunil Khilnani, born in New Delhi and educated at Cambridge University, teaches politics at Birkbeck College, University of London. The author of Arguing Revolution, he is at work on a biography of Nehru (forthcoming from FSG).

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Khilnani (politics, Univ. of London) offers a penetrating analysis of the spread of democracy to ever more diverse segments of the Indian body politic. Juxtaposed to this trend is the breakup of the Congress Party’s hegemony and the subsequent growth of regional political parties. With the ebbing of congressional power and the elimination of its Socialist economic constraints, the Indian economy has embraced greater growth as the number of Indians living below the poverty line diminishes. Khilnani attributes much of this growth to India’s cities, which emerge as paradoxical points of exclusion and economic dynamism when compared with rural India. In the process, national identity has in Khilnani’s vision been subsumed by regional political focuses, urban and rural divisions, and greater religious identification. Hence, India‘s future will necessitate the continuance of a viable democracy sustaining the economic, cultural, and social diversity of the subcontinent. The author skillfully draws out the ironies and paradoxes of Indian history with a subtle, illuminating prose. For informed readers.

From Kirkus Reviews

A profound meditation on the meaning and significance of India, which, Khilnani (Politics/Univ. of London) argues, has a far wider relevance than it is conventional to suppose. The relevance comes in part, of course, from the fact that India is the most populous democracy in the world and that it, unlike most of the countries that became independent in the postwar period, remained a democracy, with the exception of a 22- month “emergency” imposed by Indira Gandhi. This is curious, because there was little in India‘s history to prepare it for democracy, and its independence caused the fearful bloodletting of Partition, when Pakistan broke away. Khilnani calls Partition “the unspeakable sadness at the heart of the idea of India,” which raises the question of whether it was a division of one territory between two nations or peoples, or the breaking of one civilization into two territories. He believes that the survival of democracy is largely attributable to Nehru’s exemplary adherence to democratic and parliamentary procedures during his long ascendancy from 1947 to 1964 and that democracy has now “irreversibly entered the Indian political imagination.” But the understanding of democracy has changed. Government has become more centralized and powerful, the stakes have become much higher, the studious secularism and religious tolerance of the earlier period have become more tenuous, and violence has grown. Democracy has come to mean adherence to the electoral process. In his most perceptive essays, Khilnani explores this new conception and what it now means to be an Indian. His analysis of the economy is less satisfactory and fails to give a sense of where India is going since it shook off what was called “the Hindu rate of growth,” and whether, amid all the other roiling issues, economic rationality can prevail. An intelligent, well-written. and original contribution to the analysis of a country that, perhaps because it has been a good deal less troublesome than China, has received disproportionately less attention.

Product Details:

· Paperback: 208 pages

· Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

· June 4 1999

· Language: English

· ISBN-10: 0374525919

· ISBN-13: 978-0374525910

In an era that abounds with superficial books on South Asia, Khilnani’s is an insightful and sensitive book, though perhaps somewhat out of sync (and this is not a criticism) with the contemporary Indian urban middle-class mood, which delights in denigrating all things perceived as “Nehruvian”; some of the other reviewers have categorized Khilnani as part of the “old school” of Indian historiographers, vaguely dismissed as “leftists”or “Nehruvians”; nothing could be further from the truth: while the book displays an empathy with Nehru’s idea of India, it is far too sophisticated to accept that conception as anything more than one of a number of competing ideas, albeit one that has exercised great power over many in the country’s urban elite. Hindutva is another such idea of India, and Khilnani offers a nuanced appraisal, far removed from both the fascistic infatuations of the right and the unthinking denunciations of those on the Indian left. Finally: the book is particularly useful on Indira Gandhi, and Khilnani persuasively links her “mass democratisation” of the late 1960’s and 70’s to the rise of both the saffron parties and the lower-caste mobilizations of the last fifteen years, though the most intellectually stimulating chapter remains the one on the architecture of the colonial city, conceptualized by Khilnani as, among others, the site where colonialism was acted out, the site, in other words, of the Indian’s subjection.

The Idea of India

Sunil Khilnani; With a New Introduction by the Author

banknotes.jpg

“THE MEN WHO RULED INDIA”: PHILIP MASON BOOK

August 28, 2010 at 3:30 pm | Posted in Asia, Books, History, India | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

menindiabook.jpg

The Men Who Ruled India

Philip Mason (Author)

Product Details:

· Hardcover: 368 pages

· Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc. Abridged edition

· March 1985

· Language: English

· ISBN-10: 0393019462

· ISBN-13: 978-0393019469

This review is from: The Men Who Ruled India (Hardcover)

This book presents the Englishman’s point of view about their time spent in India, chronicling the life and times of the British officers of the Indian civil service. It brings out the wonderful traits of the English character, so woefully missing today, that enabled them to build and run an empire the likes of which the world has not seen.

This book immediately brings to the reader’s mind the vivid contrast between the well-governed districts and provinces of the British era and the ill-governed ones of the India of today; the scrupulously honest British civil service and the corrupt Indian establishment. The book highlights some of the wonderful gifts of the British empire to India – a full-fledged political unity, a network of railheads from which no village was more than 50 kms away (at the beginning of the 20th century, India had more than 30,000 km of railway track; in contrast China had less than 3000), separation of judicial and executive functions of the state, settlement of land revenue and keeping of meticulous land records (in Moghul and Maratha territories, the land revenue was at least 1/3 rd and 1/4th of the produce; it was 1/8th in British India), crackdown on Thugee and efforts to reform customs like sati, human sacrifice and child marriage.

However, the book is less than fair to the Indian movement for independence. The author has used unjustifiably strong language to describe the actions of Nanaji Peshwa, Tilak and even Shivaji. For Indians, this is a good book to get a perspective of events from the other side – something that has been smudged by years of silly Congress propaganda. For example, the timing and motive of that most thoughtless and inane movement – the Quit India movement of 1942.

Indians have been conditioned to think of the British period as a period of darkness, but the fact is that there was order and probity that was absent in the Mughal, Maratha and Sikh territories and is, indeed, missing in India today. It may perhaps be preferable to live in anarchy, as Mr. Gandhi implored the British to leave India to, but it is painful nonetheless.

Any period of foreign rule evokes strong feelings, but to a nation firmly steeped in mediaeval times, British rule was a bitter way of bringing the fruits of the European renaissance and industrial revolution. Certainly, British imperialism was benign as compared to Portuguese, Japanese, German, Italian or Russian imperialism. The tragedy is that they stayed longer than necessary, spoiled a lot many good things about India and handed over the reins to a class of Indians that did not understand India and tried to ape the western nations’ overtly mental and materialistic way to progress.

PHILIP MASON will be remembered first and foremost as a writer of history, not of the exhaustively researched, academic kind addressed to fellow specialists, but sound, well-reflected, worldly-wise history, beautifully written and effortlessly read, such as appeals to people of experience in every walk of life. Less well-known, but no less important, was his career as an outstandingly able member of the Indian Civil Service during the 20 years leading up to Indian independence, and also his pioneering work in promoting the study of racial and minority problems as the founding director of the Institute of Race Relations.

Mason was born in 1906, the son of a country doctor in the Derbyshire hills, who sent him to Sedbergh School and on to Balliol College, Oxford, where he took a first class degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics. He joined the Indian Civil Service in 1928, and served successively as Assistant Magistrate in the United Provinces, Under-Secretary in the War Department, Deputy Commissioner in the Himalayan district of Garhwal – a remote, sub-Himalayan district of more than 5,000 square miles – Deputy Secretary in the Defence and War Department, Secretary to the Chiefs of Statf Committee and finally as Joint Secretary to the War Department, when his highly promising career was ended by Indian independence.

During the war years he had worked closely with Wavell and later with Mountbatten, and there could surely have been a continuing future for him in some other part of the Commonwealth or else in the rapidly expanding field of diplomacy, had he chosen to go that way. Instead, he decided for early retirement with his wife and four children to a smallholding in the west of England, where they hoped, with the help of his ready pen, to make ends meet.

It was a gamble and it did not work.

The books came – seven novels and two volumes of The Men Who Ruled India (as The Founders and The Guardians were called when reprinted as one volume in 1985), about the major figures of the Indian Civil Service, all published under the pen name of Philip Woodruff between 1945 and 1954. But the financial return did not meet the needs of a family of six, and in 1952 he found part-time employment at the Royal Institute of International Affairs as Director of Studies in the newly established field of Race Relations.

It became his business both to undertake research himself and also to seek out, and guide towards publication, scholarly work in a variety of disciplines which had a bearing on racial problems. For his own first study he chose Southern Rhodesia, which was just then entering upon a highly controversial federation with Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland.

In The Birth of a Dilemma (1958) he presented brilliantly the predicaments involved in the creation of a colony of settlement in a land already well occupied by indigenous populations. The successor volume called The Two Nations he left to a younger colleague, but himself contributed the third and most contemporary, The Year of Decision (1960).

Meanwhile, in London his post at Chatham House was burgeoning into the directorship of an independent Institute of Race Relations, for which he had not only to devise the programme but also to find the supporting funds. He still managed to have long weekends at home in the country for reading and writing, but his mid-weeks were busy with people.

A great believer in personal visits, he became a well-known figure in the offices of the international mining, banking and trading companies in the City of London and in those of the great charitable foundations. And he was to be seen early and late dispensing hospitality, though always with a serious purpose, to guests at the Athenaeum and Travellers’ clubs.

The first large project of the new institute was the report Colour and Citizenship in 1969 by Jim Rose and Nicholas Deakin. It was prompted by the large migration from the Caribbean and its sometimes ugly repercussions in British politics, and it did much to calm the atmosphere of public debate on British racial issues.

From here Mason’s interests moved increasingly towards Latin America, where he set in motion several studies and travelled extensively himself with results that were apparent in Patterns of Dominance (1970), the last of his books to be written for the institute before he retired from the directorship in 1969.

He left behind him an apparently flourishing enterprise, with a magnificent record of sponsored publications and a promising team of six young research fellows to carry things forward. It was a sadness to him to watch his creation disintegrate as it fell victim to the academic disturbances of the next three years.

Nine more books were to follow during the first 15 years of Mason’s retirement before blindness drew its curtain on his literary work. They included a short history of the Indian Army, A Matter of Honour (1974), a life of Kipling, The Glass, the Shadow and the Fire (1975), his Bampton lectures published as The Dove in Harness (1976), and two delightful volumes of autobiography, A Shaft of Sunlight (1978) and A Thread of Silk (1984).

The first concerns his Indian years and breathes the romance of empire (at least for those who ruled), with long days in the saddle and long evenings by the camp fire listening to the varied problems of his Indian clients. The second, necessarily less glamorous in content, centres on the world of ideas, institutions, and family.

Both are notable for the frank discussion of the part played in his life by his deep commitment to the Christian religion. For most of it he was an Anglo-Catholic, prepared for adult life by the Cowley Fathers, and with a faith much strengthened during a period of temporary blindness caused by a shooting accident in 1941, when his wife Mary read to him daily from the New Testament and they discussed its contents together.

During the institute years he wrote and lectured on Christianity and race. In 1975 he was invited to give the Bampton lectures at Oxford. But as Anglo-Catholics in an ordinary country parish, he and Mary increasingly felt themselves to be schismatics within an already schismatic church. At last in 1978, when he was 72, they decided to rejoin the mainstream as Roman Catholics.

The decision crystallised during a holiday in Venice, where they had sat together rapt in contemplation of Titian’s altarpiece of the Assumption in the church of the Frari and he said to her, “I believe in that picture.” Soon after their return home he said to her at breakfast, “Why don’t we do it today?”, and she replied, “Why not, indeed.”

It was a characteristic decision, swiftly taken, even after half a century of searching, and it was adhered to with confidence to the end.

Philip Mason, colonial civil servant and writer: born London 19 March 1906; OBE 1942; CIE 1946; Director, Institute of Race Relations 1958-69; FRSL 1976; married 1935 Mary Hayes (two sons, two daughters); died Cambridge 25 January 1999.

The Men Who Ruled India

Philip Mason (Author)

banknotes.jpg

INDIA INFORMATION: PIB

August 27, 2010 at 1:03 pm | Posted in Ecology, Economics, Financial, India, Research | Leave a comment

spin-globe.gif

books-globe.gif

globe-purple.gif

history.gif

world.gif

compass.gif

loudspeaker.gif

globeinmoney.jpg

Press Information Bureau (PIB)

Government of India PIB

pib@nic.in

Press Information Bureau
“A” – Wing, Shastri Bhawan, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Road, New Delhi – 110 001 Phone 23389338

Requested Ministry-wise PIB releases:

· Public Interest Disclosure and Protection to Persons Making the Disclosure Bill, 2010″ Tabled in Lok Sabha

· Adolescence Education Programme

· Financial Assistance to NE States for Technical Institutions

· Corporal Punishment

· Charging of Capitation Fee and Misleading of Students by Educational Institutes

· Amendments in RTE Act

· Wrestling- Preparations at a Glance

· Weightlifting – Preparations at a Glance

· Loans to SCs & STs

· Procedure on Corporate Take ove

· Govt. May Revise Fund Sharing Pattern for Implementation of Revised Rte-SSA

· Govt. Rejects Tobacco! Institute of India’s Demand for Reduction in Excise Duty on Filter an d Non Filter Cigarettes

· No Additional Tax Levied on Vehicles Going to Amarnath and Vaishno Devi

· Fiscal, Administrative and Monetary Measures Helped to Reduce Inflation

· Swavalamban Pension Scheme for the Poor

· Index of Six Core Industries (Base: 1993-94=100) July 2010

· INDIA-ASEAN Services & Investment Agreement Negotiations Reviewed:

· India Committed to Regional Integration of CEPEA: Anand Sharma

· Production of Crude Oil and Natural Gas in July, 2010

· Railway Revenue Earnings up by 9.11 Per Cent During the Period 11th -! 20th August 2010

· Achievement Exceeds Targets in Domestic Air Cargo in 2009-10

· DGCA Directs Airlines on Steps to Prevent Unsafe Flying Environment

· Seed Registration Must in Seed Bill 2010; Farmers Exempted

· Policy Thrust on Income Earning Opportunities for Farmers

· Kharif Crops Acreage Crosses 950 Lakh Hectare Area;

· Warehousing Development and Regulatory Authority Being! Set Up

· Use of Biometric Identification System for TPDS

· 34% Decline in Retail Price of Sugar in Delhi

· Supply of Quality Fertilizers

· Fertilizers Subsidy and Agricultural Productivity

· RD Ministry Releases Rs. 16.87 Lakh Under SGSY for Orissa

· RD Ministry Releases Rs. 18.72 Lakh Under SGSY for J&K

· Connecting Rural Roads in Jammu & Kashmir

· Central Employment Guarantee Council takes stock of Working Group Reports on Mahatma Gandhi NREGA

· Mining Minister Appeals to States to Improve Governance to Check Illegal Mining

Press Information Bureau (PIB)

Government of India PIB

pib@nic.in

Press Information Bureau
“A” – Wing, Shastri Bhawan, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Road, New Delhi – 110 001 Phone 23389338

banknotes.jpg

Next Page »


Entries and comments feeds.