ENGINE SCIENCE IN THE JACK GOLDSTONE CHAPTER IN “THE QING FORMATION IN WORLD-HISTORICAL TIME” BOOK EDITED BY LYNN STRUVE

July 19, 2010 at 10:52 pm | Posted in Asia, Books, China, Economics, Financial, History, Research, World-system | Leave a comment

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The Qing Formation in World-Historical Time

Edited by LYNN A. STRUVE

Harvard University Press 2004

Cambridge, Mass.: 405 pp.

Qing dynasty (1636–1911)

This volume grew out of a conference on “The Qing Formation in World and Chinese Time,” held at Indiana University, Bloomington, in 1999. “Qing formation” refers to the formative period of the Qing dynasty (1636–1911) broadly construed. The concern with “world-historical time” reflects ongoing debate among historians of China over how one reconciles events and periodization within China in relation to broader global processes, and specifically over the applicability of the term “early modern” to China.

For historians of late imperial China, periodization reflects China‘s place in the world and engages a whole array of debates that grew out of the historiography and events of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These include assumptions about China‘s fitness to enter the modern world, European superiority, China‘s isolation and ability to undergo internal change, and so forth. Scholars who find that China, as well as Europe, can be aptly described as early modern argue implicitly that Europe was not somehow uniquely qualified (racially or culturally) to dominate world markets and politics. Nor was China willfully isolated during this period or innately incapable of developing and employing technologies that Europe enjoyed. Other scholars feel that using a term developed in the context of European history continues to subjugate the study of China to a model of “normalcy” and a trajectory to modernity that is not appropriate. The essays in this volume each explore questions of China‘s “early modernity” in different ways and represent a range of views on the use of the term.

Jack Goldstone’s contribution to this volume, “Neither Late Imperial nor Early Modern: Efflorescences and the Qing Formation in World History” is chapter 6.

Goldstone hones in on “engine science” as the secret essence that allowed the Western historical spurt forward but globalization means this industrial-historical “trump card” loses its uniqueness.

“Neither Late Imperial nor Early Modern: Efflorescences and the Qing in World History,”chapter by Goldstone in The Qing Formation in WorldHistorical Time, Lynn Struve, ed.

Harvard University Press, 2004

Jack A. Goldstone

Virginia E. and John T. Hazel, Jr. Professor

Director, Center for Global Policy George Mason University

Jack A. Goldstone is the Virginia E. and John T. Hazel Jr. Professor at the George Mason School of Public Policy and an Eminent Scholar.

Email: jgoldsto@gmu.edu
Web: http://mason.gmu.edu/~jgoldsto/

Main: 703-993-1409
Fax: 703-993-8215

3401 Fairfax Drive – MS 3B1
Arlington, Virginia 22201

The Qing Formation in World-Historical Time

Edited by LYNN A. STRUVE

Harvard University Press 2004

Cambridge, Mass.: 405 pp.

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