“THE FLOODED EARTH”: PETER WARD BOOK

July 16, 2010 at 11:33 pm | Posted in Books, Earth, Ecology, Research | Leave a comment

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The Flooded Earth:

Our Future In a World Without Ice Caps

Peter D. Ward

(Author)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Drawing from research on polar melting and current climate studies, paleontologist and NASA astrobiologist Ward (Under a Green Sky) depicts grim scenarios of the future as the ice caps melt away. Ward imagines Canadian indigenous people waging guerrilla warfare in 2030 on a government poisoning their bodies and ancestral lands with tars sands mining; Miami in 2120 as a lawless island abandoned by a federal government overwhelmed with building dikes to protect less doomed cities; topsoil from a dried-out Midwest being shipped in 2515 to an Antarctic Freehold State, one of the few locations where crops could still be grown; Bangladeshi refugees, fleeing their flooded nation after a 24-foot sea rise in 3004, being gunned down by Indian Border Security Forces. Ward assures us that it doesn’t have to be this way and attempts a feeble optimism. He recommends a combination of lifestyle changes and technical solutions, although he warns that the latter are fraught with unknown perils. This is indisputably important information, but Ward’s conclusion that hope is perhaps itself a goal, makes for a depressing read. (July)

Review

Kirkus
“NASA astrobiologist [Peter] Ward describes the disastrous changes that can be expected as sea levels continue their accelerating rise due to global warming… a blunt, vivid warning.”

SALON.com

A beautifully written, thoroughly research and relentlessly terrifying work, and a must-read for anybody with an interest in the environment or the future of our planet.”

Product Details:

· Hardcover: 272 pages

· Publisher: Basic Books

· June 29, 2010

· Language: English

· ISBN-10: 0465009492

· ISBN-13: 978-0465009497

The Flooded Earth: Our Future In a World Without Ice Caps

Peter D. Ward

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OXFORD POVERTY AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE: MULTIDIMENSIONAL POVERTY INDEX

July 16, 2010 at 9:51 pm | Posted in Earth, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, Third World, World-system | Leave a comment

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UN AND OXFORD UNIVERSITY UNVEIL NEW INDEX TO

MEASURE POVERTY

Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI)

UNNews@un.org

New York July 14 2010

UN AND OXFORD UNIVERSITY UNVEIL NEW INDEX TO MEASURE

POVERTY

Wed 14 Jul 2010

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Oxford University today launched a new index to measure poverty levels which they said give a multidimensional picture of people living in hardship, and could help target development resources more effectively.

The new measure, the Multidimensional Poverty Index, or MPI, was developed and applied by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) with UNDP support, the two institutions said in a joint press release.

It will be featured in the forthcoming 20th anniversary edition of the UNDP Human Development Report, and replaces the Human Poverty Index, which had been included in these reports since 1997.

This years Human Development Report will be published in late October, but research findings from the MPI were made available today at a policy forum in London and on line on the websites of OPHI (http://www.ophi.org.uk) and the UNDP Human Development Report (http://hdr.undp.org/en/).

The MPI assesses a range of critical factors or deprivations at the household level: from education to health outcomes to assets and services. Taken together, these factors provide a fuller portrait of acute poverty than simple income measures, according to OPHI and UNDP.

The measure reveals the nature and extent of poverty at different levels: from household up to regional, national and international levels. The multidimensional approach to assessing poverty has been adapted for national use in Mexico, and is now being considered by Chile and Colombia.

The MPI is like a high resolution lens which reveals a vivid spectrum of challenges facing the poorest households, said OPHI Director Sabina Alkire, who created the MPI with James Foster of George Washington University.

The UNDP Human Development Report Office is joining forces with OPHI to promote international discussions on the practical applicability of this multidimensional approach to measuring poverty.

We are featuring the Multidimensional Poverty Index in the 20th anniversary edition of the Human Development Report this year because we consider it a highly innovative approach to quantifying acute poverty, Jeni Klugman, Director of the UNDP Human Development Report Office and the principal author of this years report, said.

The MPI provides a fuller measure of poverty than the traditional dollar-a-day formulas. It is a valuable addition to the family of instruments we use to examine broader aspects of well-being, including UNDP’s Human Development Index and other measures of inequality across the population and between genders, she added.

OPHI researchers analysed data from 104 countries with a combined population of 5.2 billion or 78 per cent of the world’s total. About 1.7 billion people in the countries covered a third of their entire population live in multidimensional poverty, according to the MPI. This exceeds the 1.3 billion people, in those same countries, estimated to live on $1.25 a day or less, the more commonly accepted measure of extreme poverty.

The MPI also captures distinct and broader aspects of poverty. For example, in Ethiopia 90 per cent of people are MPI poor compared to the 39 per cent who are classified as living in extreme poverty under income terms alone.

Conversely, 89 per cent of Tanzanians are extreme income-poor, compared to 65 per cent who are MPI poor. The MPI captures deprivations directly � in health and educational outcomes and key services, such as water, sanitation and electricity. In some countries these resources are provided free or at low cost; in others they are out of reach even for many working people with an income.

Half of the worlds poor as measured by the MPI live in South Asia (51 per cent or 844 million people) and one quarter in Africa (28 per cent or 458 million).

Niger has the greatest intensity and incidence of poverty in any country, with 93 per cent of the population classified as poor in MPI terms.

Even in countries with strong economic growth in recent years, the MPI analysis reveals the persistence of acute poverty.

India is a major case in point. There are more MPI poor people in eight Indian states alone (421 million in Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Orissa, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, and West Bengal) than in the 26 poorest African countries combined (410 million).

The MPI also reveals great variations within countries: Nairobi has the same level of MPI poverty as the Dominican Republic, whereas Kenyas rural northeast is poorer in MPI terms than Niger.

The recently released 2010 UN Millennium Development Goals Report stressed that the MDGs the eight poverty eradication and social development targets which countries have committed to try to achieve by 2015 will be fully realized only by addressing the needs of those most disadvantaged by geography, age, gender or ethnicity, OPHI researchers point out.

Our measure identifies the most vulnerable households and groups and enables us to understand exactly which deprivations afflict their lives, said Ms. Alkire. The new measure can help governments and development agencies wishing to target aid more effectively to those specific communities, she added.

July 14 2010

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

UN AND OXFORD UNIVERSITY UNVEIL NEW INDEX TO

MEASURE POVERTY

UNNews@un.org

New York July 14 2010

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“LONG VIEW FROM DELHI”: ICRIER INDIA

July 16, 2010 at 1:51 pm | Posted in Asia, Books, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, India, Research | Leave a comment

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ICRIER

www.icrier.org

“Long View from Delhi

Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)
Core 6A, 4th Floor
India Habitat Center
Lodhi Road
New Delhi 110003 India

Tel: (91-11) 43 112400

Fax: (91-11) 24620180, 24618941
ahuja@icrier.res.in

July 16 2010

ICRIER – established in August 1981 – is an autonomous, policy-oriented, not-for-profit, economic policy think tank. ICRIER’s main focus is to enhance the knowledge content of policy making by undertaking analytical research that is targeted at improving India’s interface with the global economy.

The last three months have seen the launch of a book “Long View from Delhi” and the publication of several working papers and articles by ICRIER researchers. Our newsletter is a way of keeping you updated on what has been happening at ICRIER. Your feedback has always been important for us. As always, we look forward to hearing from you.

The Newsletter can be downloaded from the following link:

ICRIER Newsletter

Do visit our website: www.icrier.org

Could you also share with us the contact details of people you know who may be interested in receiving ICRIER’s papers and notices?

Warm Regards

Tara Nair

Consulting Editor

ICRIER

E-mail – tnair@icrier.res.in

Mobile – 9810017591

ICRIER – established in August 1981 – is an autonomous, policy-oriented, not-for-profit, economic policy think tank. ICRIER’s main focus is to enhance the knowledge content of policy making by undertaking analytical research that is targeted at improving India’s interface with the global economy.

We have nurtured our autonomy by establishing an endowment fund, income from which enables us to pursue our priority research agenda. ICRIER receives other financial support from a number of sources including grants from the Government of India, multilateral international institutions, bilateral agencies and the private sector.

A medium-term strategy that spells out ICRIER’s vision and focus areas can be found on its website www.icrier.org. ICRIER has its own code of conduct for undertaking research.

To effectively disseminate its research findings, ICRIER organises workshops/ seminars/ conferences to bring together political leaders, policy makers, academicians, industry representatives and media persons to try and generate a more informed understanding on issues of major policy interest. ICRIER invites distinguished scholars and policy makers from around the world to deliver public lectures on economic themes of interest to contemporary India.

ICRIER’s founding Chairman was Dr. K.B. Lall who led the organisation since its inception till 1992 when he handed over the Chairmanship to Mr. R.N. Malhotra (1992-1996). He was followed by Dr. I.G. Patel who remained Chairman from 1997 until his demise in July 2005. Amongst ICRIER’s founding members are Dr. Manmohan Singh, Dr. C. Rangarajan, Dr. M.S. Swaminathan, Dr. Jagdish Bhagwati, Dr. R. J. Chelliah, Mr. Muchkund Dubey, Prof. Deepak Nayyar etc. ICRIER’s current Chairperson is Dr. Isher Judge Ahluwalia.

ICRIER

www.icrier.org

Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)
Core 6A, 4th Floor
India Habitat Center
Lodhi Road
New Delhi 110003 India

Tel: (91-11) 43 112400

Fax: (91-11) 24620180, 24618941
ahuja@icrier.res.in

July 16 2010

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