THE PANIC OF 1873 AS THE FINANCIAL BASELINE FOR THE STORY IN “THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS”

June 25, 2010 at 11:54 pm | Posted in Art, Books, Economics, Financial, Literary, USA | Leave a comment

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Greatest Opening Film Lines:

“The magnificence of the Ambersons began in 1873.”

The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

Booth Tarkington

The Magnificent Ambersons is a 1918 novel by Booth Tarkington which won the 1919 Pulitzer Prize for novel. It was the second novel in the Growth trilogy, which included The Turmoil and The Midlander..

Newton Booth Tarkington (July 29, 1869, Indianapolis – May 19, 1946) was an American novelist and dramatist best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Magnificent Ambersons.

The Magnificent Ambersons

He himself came from a patrician family that lost much of its wealth after the Panic of 1873 (after a measure of wealth returned, his mother transferred him to Princeton University to complete his education). Today, he is best known for his novel The Magnificent Ambersons which Orson Welles filmed in 1942.

The second volume in Tarkington’s Growth trilogy, it contrasted the decline of the “old money” Amberson dynasty against the rise of “new money” industrial tycoons in the years between the Civil War and World War I.

Panic of 1873

The Panic of 1873 was the start of the Long Depression, a severe nationwide economic depression in the United States that lasted until 1879. It was precipitated by the bankruptcy of the Philadelphia banking firm Jay Cooke & Company on September 18, 1873…

Greatest Opening Film Lines:

“The magnificence of the Ambersons began in 1873.”

The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

The Magnificent Ambersons is a 1918 novel by Booth Tarkington which won the 1919 Pulitzer Prize for novel. It was the second novel in the Growth trilogy, which included The Turmoil and The Midlander

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