CAMBRIDGE FORECAST GROUP ESSAY: “WHAT HAPPENS WHEN ONE TRIES TO UNDO BYGONE HISTORICAL EVENTS”

June 12, 2010 at 7:28 pm | Posted in Books, Germany, Globalization, History, Military, USA, Zionism | Leave a comment

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Cambridge Forecast Group Essay:

What Happens When One Tries to Undo Bygone Historical Events

Cheney and Rumsfeld had an obsession: overturn and negate and reverse by new violence, the American defeat In Vietnam. In other words, undo 1975.

The neocon/Rightwing Zionist obsession is to overturn the Algerian victory over the French in 1962 and the American (Eisenhower) aborting of the Suez Invasion of Egypt in 1956.

One deep reason why these two groups found it so easy to become co-dependent, giving us the Iraq War, was this overlapping overturn-the-past shared imperial obsession.

The German scholar Hildebrand shows how the “Wilhelmine Imperialists” around Hermann Goering had the same mania applied to 1914:

Wilhelmine Imperialists: Back to 1914

“Göring was the most prominent of the Wilhelmine Imperialists. This group wanted to restore the German frontiers of 1914, regain the pre-1914 overseas empire, and make Eastern Europe Germany‘s exclusive sphere of influence.”

The German diplomatic historian Klaus Hildebrand in his study of German foreign policy in the Nazi era noted that besides Hitler’s foreign policy program that there were three rival programs supported by factions in the Nazi Party, whom Hildebrand dubbed the agrarians, the revolutionary socialists, and the Wilhelmine Imperialists.[28]

Göring was the most prominent of the Wilhelmine Imperialists. This group wanted to restore the German frontiers of 1914, regain the pre-1914 overseas empire, and make Eastern Europe Germany‘s exclusive sphere of influence. This was a much more limited set of goals than Hitler’s dream of Lebensraum to be carved out with merciless racial wars. By contrast, Göring and the Wilhelmine Imperialist faction were more guided by traditional Machtpolitik in their foreign policy conceptions.[29] Furthermore, they expected to achieve their goals within the established international order. While not rejecting war as an option, they preferred diplomacy and sought political domination in eastern Europe rather than the military conquests envisioned by Hitler. They also rejected Hitler’s mystical vision of war as a necessary ordeal for the nation, and of perpetual war as desirable. Göring himself feared that a major war might interfere with his luxurious lifestyle. Göring’s advocacy of this policy led to his temporary exclusion by Hitler for a time in 1938–39 from foreign policy decisions. Göring’s unwillingness to offer a major challenge to Hitler prevented him from offering any serious resistance to Hitler’s policies, and the Wilhelmine Imperialists had no real influence.[30][31][32]

Göring had some private doubts about the wisdom of Hitler’s policies attacking Poland, which he felt would cause a world war, and was anxious to see a compromise solution. This was especially the case as the Forschungsamt (FA), Göring’s private intelligence agency, had broken the codes the British Embassy in Berlin used to communicate with London. The FA’s work showed that British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain was determined to go to war if Germany invaded Poland in 1939. This directly contradicted the advice given to Hitler by Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop (a man whom Göring loathed at the best of times) that Chamberlain would not honor the “guarantee” he had given Poland in March 1939 if Germany attacked that country.

In the summer of 1939, Göring and the rest of the Wilhelmine Imperialists made a last ditch effort to assert their foreign policy program. Göring was involved in desperate attempts to avert a war in by using various amateur diplomats, such as his deputy Helmuth Wohltat at the Four Year Plan organization, British civil servant Sir Horace Wilson, newspaper proprietor Lord Kemsley, and would be peace-makers like Swedish businessmen Axel Wenner-Gren and Birger Dahlerus, who served as couriers between Göring and various British officials.[33] All of these efforts came to naught because Hitler (who much preferred Ribbentrop’s assessment of Britain to Göring’s) would not be deterred from attacking Poland in 1939, and the Wilhelmine Imperialists were unwilling and unable to challenge Hitler despite their reservations about his foreign policy.

28. Hildebrand, Klaus The Foreign Policy of the Third Reich, London: Batsford, 1973 pages 14–21

29. Hildebrand, Klaus The Foreign Policy of the Third Reich, London: Batsford, 1973 pages 14–15

30. Hildebrand, Klaus (1973). The Foreign Policy of the Third Reich. London: Batsford. pp. 14–21.

31. Watt, D. C. (1989). How War Came. London: Heinemann. p. 619.

32. Kershaw, Ian (2000). Hitler: Nemesis. New York: W. W. Norton. pp. 95, 123.

Göring was born on 12 January, 1893 at the Marienbad sanatorium in Rosenheim, Bavaria. His father Heinrich Ernst Göring (31 October, 1839– 7 December, 1913) had been the first Governor-General of the German protectorate of South West Africa (modern day Namibia)[3]

3. Block, Maxine; E. Mary Trow (1971). Current Biography: Who’s News and Why 1941. New York: H. W. Wilson. pp. 327–330.

Hermann Wilhelm Göring (or Goering;[2] German 12 January 1893– 15 October 1946)[1] was a German politician, military leader, and a leading member of the Nazi Party. Among many offices, he was Hitler’s designated successor, and commander of the Luftwaffe (German Air Force).

He was a veteran of the First World War as an ace fighter pilot, and a recipient of the coveted Pour le Mérite (“The Blue Max”). He was the last commander of Jagdgeschwader 1, the air squadron of Manfred von Richthofen, “The Red Baron”.

· a b c d “United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Holocaust Encyclopedia, ”Hermann_Göring Timeline””. Ushmm.org. http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10007772. Retrieved 2010-03-12.

· Göring is the German spelling, but the name is commonly transliterated Goering in English and other languages, using ‹oe› as the standard representation of ‹ö›.

Cambridge Forecast Group Essay:

What Happens When One Tries to Undo Bygone Historical Events

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