GLOBAL OIL DEMAND PROJECTIONS

March 22, 2009 at 11:09 pm | Posted in Arabs, Economics, Financial, Globalization, Middle East, Oil & Gas, Russia | Leave a comment

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Riyad Bank Weekly Economic Briefing

– Mar 22 09‏

Economics (economics@riyadbank.com)

www.riyadbank.com

Sun 3/22/09

Strategic Planning Dept Economic Section economics@riyadbank.com

Dr. Ahmad A. Telfah Chief Economist

ahmad.telfah@riyadbank.com

Ohoud A. Al-Ghanim Research Analyst

ohoud.al-ghanim@riyadbank.com

Zaina T. Al-Eniezy Planning Analyst

Zaina.al-eniezy@riyadbank.com

Good day,

Kindly find attached Riyad Bank’s latest economic briefing; this issue discuses the World Economic Forecasts & projections for Global Oil Demand.

Regards,

Riyad Bank Economic Section

Strategic Planning Department

Phone: +966-1-401-3030 ext. 2119, 2161

Email: economics@riyadbank.com

Riyad Bank Weekly Economic Briefing – Mar 22 09‏

Economics (economics@riyadbank.com)

Riyad Bank P.O. Box 22622 Riyadh 11416 KSA

Tel: +966 1 401-3030 ext: 2119-2161

www.riyadbank.com

Sun 3/22/09

Mar 22, 2009

COMMENTARY

IMF World Economic Forecasts and IEA Projections for Global Oil Demand

In a new assessment prepared for the G-20 Summit scheduled in April 2 in London, the IMF projected the global economy to contract by ½ to 1 percent in 2009 on an annual average basis, in the first such fall in 60 years. According to the IMF, the global economy contracted by 5 percent in the Q42008, and the rapid decline in trade volumes, production and employment data suggest that global activity continues to contract in the first quarter of 2009. The IMF announced a range of contractions in the world, advanced and emerging economies and still working on its projections for the growth rates in a number of countries around the world to be announced on April 22. From its side, the World Bank announced that the global economy will be shrinking by 1 to 2 percent in 2009, in the worst recession since the great depression.

(% )

GLOBAL STOCK MARKETS

Current

Week

Ago

YTD

Change

US Dow Jones 7,278 7,223 -17.07%

US NASDAQ 1,457 1,431 -7.61%

US S&P500 769 756 -14.86%

DE DAX 4,069 3,953 -15.41%

UK FTSE100 3,843 3,753 -13.33%

FR CAC40 2,791 2,705 -13.27%

SW SSMI 4,787 4,726 -13.51%

JP Nikkei 7,946 7,569 -10.32%

HK Hang Seng 12,834 12,525 -10.79%

IN BSE Sensex 8,967 8,756 -7.05%

Riyad Bank Weekly Economic Briefing – Mar 22 09‏

Economics (economics@riyadbank.com)

Riyad Bank P.O. Box 22622 Riyadh 11416

KSA

Tel: +966 1 401-3030 ext: 2119-2161

www.riyadbank.com

Sun 3/22/09

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“AIR ARABIA FIRST REACTION REPORT”: BAHRAIN

March 22, 2009 at 10:29 pm | Posted in Arabs, Economics, Financial, Middle East, Research | Leave a comment

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Air Arabia First Reaction Report‏

TAIB Research (Research@taib.com)

Sun 3/22/09

In order to view our First Reaction Report for Air Arabia

(AIRA.DU), please click on the hyperlink below:

http://www.taib.com/reports/E01025032209/FRRAIRADUMARCH09.pdf

For any further information or clarification, please contact us at:

Tel: + 973 17549499 Fax: + 973 17531213

Email: research@taib.com

Best Regards,

Research Team

TAIB Securities W.L.L

Post Box 20485 Manama

Kingdom of Bahrain

Air Arabia First Reaction Report‏

TAIB Research (Research@taib.com)

Research Team

TAIB Securities W.L.L

Post Box 20485 Manama

Kingdom of Bahrain

research@taib.com

Sun 3/22/09

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BRITISH CLASSIC CINEMA 1940’S: THE ARCHERS

March 22, 2009 at 7:06 pm | Posted in Art, Film, History, United Kingdom | Leave a comment

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The Archers

Film production company

Founded 1943

Defunct 1957

Fate Partnership ended

Headquarters United Kingdom

Key people Michael Powell Emeric Pressburger

Industry Film production company

The British film-making partnership of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, also known as The Archers, made a series of influential films in the 1940s and 1950s, and in 1983 were recognized for their contributions to British cinema with the BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award, the most prestigious award given by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.

Their collaborations were mainly written by Pressburger, with Powell directing. Unusually, the pair shared a writerdirectorproducer credit for most of their films.

The Archers: The collaboration

Generally, Pressburger would create the original story (for all their films from 1940–1946 plus The Red Shoes) and write the first draft of the script. They would then pass the script back and forth a few times – they could never work on it together in the same room. For the actual dialogue, Pressburger would know what he wanted the characters to say but Powell would often supply some of the actual words.

They would both act as producers, perhaps Pressburger slightly more so than Powell, since he could sooth the feathers ruffled by Powell’s forthright manner. They became their own producers mainly to stop anyone else poking their noses in, since they had a considerable degree of freedom, especially under Rank, to make just about any film they wanted.

The direction was nearly all done by Powell, but even so The Archers generally worked as a team, with the cast and crew often making suggestions. Pressburger was always on hand, usually on the studio floor, to make sure that these late changes fitted seamlessly into the story.

Once the filming was finished, Powell would usually go off for a walk in the hills of Scotland to clear his head, but Pressburger was often closely involved in the editing, especially of the way the music was used. Pressburger was a musician himself and played the violin in an orchestra in Hungary.

When the film was finally ready and Powell was back from the Highlands, it would usually be Powell that would be the front man in any promotional work, such as interviews for the trade papers or fan magazines.

Because collaborative efforts such as Powell’s and Pressburger’s were, and continue to be, unusual in the film industry, and because of the influence of the auteur theory, which elevates the director as a film’s primary creator, Pressburger has sometimes been dismissed as “Michael Powell’s scriptwriter”, but Powell himself was the first to say, in many interviews, that he couldn’t have done most of what he did without Pressburger.

In the early 1950s the Powell and Pressburger began to produce fewer films, with notably less success. This may have been because they switched from making films for the British Rank Organisation to the Hollywood-led Alexander Korda.

The Archers’ productions officially came to an end in 1957, and the pair separated to pursue their individual careers. The separation was quite amicable and they remained devoted friends for the rest of their lives.

The Archers Production Company – filmography:

  1. The Battle of the River Plate (1956) … Production Company (as Arcturus Productions)

  2. Oh… Rosalinda!! (1955) … Production Company

  3. The Wild Heart (1952) … Production Company (for)

  4. The Tales of Hoffmann (1951) … Production Company

  5. Gone to Earth (1950) … Production Company (in association with)

  6. The Elusive Pimpernel (1950) … Production Company (in association with)

  7. The Small Back Room (1949) … Production Company

  8. The Red Shoes (1948) … Production Company

  9. The End of the River (1947) … Production Company

  10. Black Narcissus (1947) … Production Company

  11. A Matter of Life and Death (1946) … Production Company

  12. ‘I Know Where I’m Going!’ (1945) … Production Company

  13. A Canterbury Tale (1944) … Production Company (as A Production of the Archers)

  14. The Volunteer (1943) … Production Company

  15. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) … Production Company

  16. The Silver Fleet (1943) … Production Company (as A Production of the Archers)

  17. One of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942) … Production Company

The Archers

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BRITISH CLASSIC CINEMA 1940’S: CINEGUILD PRODUCTIONS

March 22, 2009 at 12:30 am | Posted in Art, Film, Globalization, History, Research, United Kingdom | Leave a comment

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CINEGUILD

Cineguild Productions

Production Company – filmography:

  1. Madeleine (1950) … Production Company

  2. The Passionate Friends (1949) … Production Company

  3. Oliver Twist (1948) … Production Company

  4. Blanche Fury (1948) … Production Company

  5. Take My Life (1947) … Production Company

  6. Great Expectations (1946) … Production Company

  7. Brief Encounter (1945) … Production Company

  8. Blithe Spirit (1945) … Production Company (as A Noel Coward-Cineguild Production)

Blithe Spirit (1945)

Noël Coward comedy about a ghost who won’t stay still

Brief Encounter (1945)

Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson start a great British romance

Great Expectations (1946)

David Lean’s definitive Dickens adaptation

Madeleine (1949)

David Lean’s film about real-life alleged murderess Madeleine Smith

Oliver Twist (1948)

David Lean’s definitive version of Charles Dickens’ classic novel

Passionate Friends, The (1948)

David Lean film about a woman who marries for money rather than love

This Happy Breed (1944)

David Lean/Noël Coward film about a London family between the wars

Related Collections

Encyclopedia of British Film

The exhaustive reference work from which this biography is taken

Related People and Organisations

Lean, Sir David (1908-1991)

Director, Writer, Editor

Neame, Ronald (1911-)

Cinematographer, Director, Screenplay

The 2009 DVD release of David Lean’s classic “Hobson’s Choice” from 1954, starring Charles Laughton, makes mention of the key 1940’s British film company Cinequild, mentioned in the DVD’s audio commentary special feature.

The association on In Which We Serve (1942) of director David Lean, cinematographer Ronald Neame and (associate) producer Anthony Havelock-Allan) was formalised as Cineguild in 1944, formed by Havelock-Allan who invited the others to join, and the resulting production company contributed substantially to the prestige of ’40s British cinema.

It began with three films derived from Noël Coward‘s plays: This Happy Breed (1944), Blithe Spirit (1945) and, most famously, Brief Encounter (1945). The company switched from Coward to Dickens for its next two successes, Great Expectations (1946) and Oliver Twist (1948), both much praised.

Just before Brief Encounter, Cineguild accepted an invitation to join Rank‘s Independent Producers (a group including The Archers and Launder and Gilliat‘s Individual Pictures), which meant their productions were underwritten by Rank but that they were also given remarkable creative freedom.

Cineguild came to an end partly as a result of the partners wanting to do different things. Neame directed the proficient thriller, Take My Life (1947), Havelock-Allan bowed out of Oliver Twist to produce Blanche Fury (d. Marc Allégret, 1948), and Lean went on to make two films with his then wife Ann Todd: The Passionate Friends (1948), taking over the direction of this from Neame, and the sumptuous period piece, Madeleine (1950). For seven years Cineguild had a ‘quality’ reputation out of proportion to the number of films it made.

Bibliography:
Neame, Ronald,
From the Horse’s Mouth (2002).

Brian McFarlane, Encyclopedia of British Film

Cineguild

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