SOCIAL DISINTEGRATION IN EUROPE FROM 1880-1920: THE NOVEL “THE SLEEPWALKERS” BY HERMANN BROCH

March 23, 2008 at 12:22 pm | Posted in Art, Books, Financial, Germany, Globalization, History, Literary, Philosophy | Leave a comment

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The Sleepwalkers

Hermann Broch (Author)

Product Details:

  • Paperback: 656 pages

  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage International Ed edition
    (January 30, 1996)

  • Language: English

  • ISBN-10: 0679764062

  • ISBN-13: 978-0679764069

Hermann Broch (1886-1951) is remembered among English-speaking readers for his novels The Sleepwalkers and The Death of Virgil, and among German-speaking readers for his novels as well as his works on moral and political philosophy, his aesthetic theory, and his varied criticism.

Born in Vienna in 1886, Broch is considered one of the great names of 20th Century German literature. Critics will place him in a pantheon that includes Joyce, Musil, Kafka, Mann, and Proust. Son of a well-off Jewish textile manufacturer (at an early age he converted to Catholicism), Broch had thirst for high intellect. Eventually he gave up his academic plans, his future as an industrialist, in pursuit of literature, through which he would deal with ethical questions and realms of experience rejected by the Vienna Circle of logical positivists. Likewise he devoted his life to the study of mass psychology and politics.

The novel reflects the disintegration of values in Germany between 1880 and 1920, the psychological distress and disorientation of interwar Germany in which Nazism set its foot.

“The Sleepwalkers” (published when the author was 40) is a trilogy, a three-dimensional work with one underlying philosophical unit. The first book, “The Romantic” portrays 19th century realism with von Pasenow as main character, a Prussian aristocrat clinging to ethical values considered outdated. The second book, “The Anarchist,” portrays the accountant Esch who is in search of a “balance” of values in unstable pre-war Germany. Both characters will meet in the third book “The Realist,” and will find hope in a fanatical religious sect, which foresees the coming of a Redeemer (fascism, Hitler). They will be defeated by Huguenau, an army deserter and opportunist, representing the new ethical standards of a society free of values or to put it correctly “with no values.” There are several parallel plots, a number of alienated characters, and cumbrous symbolism. To make things a bit more complex and elaborate, there are 16 chapters of poetry, and 10 chapters (Desintegration of Values) of sound and intensive philosophy.

According to Broch, “sleepwalkers” refer to a gap between the death of an ethical system and the birth of another, as much as a somnambulist finds himself in a state between sleep and awake. The novel reflects the disintegration of values in Germany between 1880 and 1920, the psychological distress and disorientation of interwar Germany in which Nazism set its foot. Broch views the Renaissance as the starting point of disintegration of a unified Christian world into a multifaceted society with no ethical roots.

Broch’s Trilogy is the chronicle of the evolution of Germany in particular and the whole of Europe in general between the years 1888 and 1918. The philosophical focus of the trilogy should be searched for in the third novel, Huguenau or the Realist and within that in the essay ‘Disintegration of Values”, which is allegedly written by a Bertrand Mueller, who according to Broch himself is the same Bertrand who appears in the first two novels of the trilogy. The essay on disintegration of values closely follows Max Weber’s Protestant Ethics and the Spirit of Capitalism. In fact not before we understand Weber’s theory of modernity and the role of the protestant reformation in the rise of modern Capitalism can we appreciate the full vigor of Broch’s narrative. In ten separate parts, Broch explains masterfully the notion of style of an age, the relation of plastic arts with the the style, the concept of inner logic within each indididual value-system and the effect of it on the life of the individual. The third part of the novel, the realist, is the culmination of the trilogy as such. It is where all the characters meet and it is there that Broch uses all different narrative modes. A certain air of inevitablity is prevalent in Broch’s narrative of the disintegration of values, which, in turn, appears to follow a certain Hegelian Historicism. This third novel of the trilogy consists of five separate parts, three of which are stories taking place in a German city near the Belgian borders and the other two are the story of the Salvation Army Girl in Berlin, which is Bertrand Mueller’s journal and then his essay on the disintegration of values. It is Broch’s wonderful technique to combine all five narratives as one by integrating the story of Huguenau in the essay, as though Mueller, omnisciently and from afar comments on the life of the people in this small and remote town. Bertrand Mueller, therefore, is Broch’s own alter ego. He, along with Broch, is the author of Disintegration of Values.

The Sleepwalkers

The novel reflects the disintegration of values in Germany and Europe between 1880 and 1920

CLIMATE CHANGE HUNGARY: APRIL 10 2008

March 23, 2008 at 3:54 am | Posted in Earth, Globalization, Research, Science & Technology, World-system | Leave a comment

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CLIMATE CHANGE 2007:

Implications for Hungary

Key insights from the IPCC’s

Fourth Assessment Report

An IPCC Outreach Event

Central European University

April 10-11, 2008

Patrons:

Prof. Rajendra PACHAURI, Chairman of the IPCC

Dr. Gábor FODOR, Minister of Environment and Water, Hungary

Prof. Yehuda ELKANA, President and Rector, CEU

Programme Committee:

Dr. Bert METZ, Co-Chair, IPCC Working Group III

Dr. Tibor FARAGÓ, IPCC
National Focal Point for Hungary, MoEW

Prof. Diana ÜRGE-VORSATZ,

Central European University

Prof. István LÁNG, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Ms. Aleksandra NOVIKOVA, Central European University

Dr. Ferenc L. TÓTH, Corvinus University, Hungary and IAEA, Austria

Venue: CEU, Nádor utca 9, Budapest 1051

Hungary

TENTATIVE PROGRAM

Day 1: April 10, 2008

 

7.30 – 8.20

Welcome coffee and registration: Arrival hall of CEU

 

8.30 – 9.00

8.30 – 8.45

8.45 – 9.00

Opening Session

Prof. Yehuda Elkana, Rector and President, CEU/Hungary

Welcome address

Dr. Gábor Fodor, Minister of Environment and Water/Hungary

Opening speech: Climate change in the Hungarian context

 

The session will be chaired by Prof. István Láng, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

9.00 – 10.00

 

 

9.00 – 9.20

9.20 – 9.40

9.40 – 10.00

Technical Session 1: Climate change science and impacts

Chair: Dr. Tibor Faragó, IPCC national focal point for Hungary, MoEW

Speakers:

Prof. Suzan Solomon, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Earth System Research Laboratory/USA; Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group I

Climate change science: Key findings of the Fourth Assessment Report

Prof. Martin Parry, Met Office Hadley Centre/Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College, University of London/UK; Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II

Climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability: Key findings of the Fourth Assessment Report

Prof. István Láng, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Preparation for climate change and its impacts in Hungary

 

10.00 – 10.30

Coffee break

 

10.30 – 11.40

10.30 – 10.50

11.00 – 11.20

11.20 – 11.40

Technical Session 2: Climate change and Hungary

Chair: Prof. Diana Ürge-Vorsatz, CEU/Hungary; Coordinating Lead Author, IPCC

Speakers:

Prof. Judit Bartholy, Eötvös Loránd University/Hungary

Climate change observations and projections in Hungary

Dr. László Haszpra, Hungarian Meteorological Service

Measurement and analysis of trends of atmospheric GHGs in Hungary

Discussion

 

11.40 – 12.30

Panel discussion 1: Climate change projections in Europe and Hungary

Panel chair: Dr. Zsuzsanna Iványi, Regional Environmental Center/Hungary

Panelists:

Prof. Judit Bartholy, Eötvös Loránd University/Hungary

Dr. András Horányi, Hungarian Meteorological Service

Dr. Tamás Práger, Hungarian Meteorological Service

 

12.30 – 14.00

Lunch break

 

14.00 – 16.00

14.00 – 14.30

14.30 – 14.50

14.50 – 15.10

15.10 – 15.30

15.30 – 16.00

Technical Session 3: Impacts of climate change

Chair: Prof. Zsolt Harnos, Corvinus University; Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Speakers:

Dr. Ferenc L. Tóth, Corvinus University of Budapest/Hungary, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/Austria, Lead Author, IPCC

Socio-economic aspects in climate change impacts and adaptation

Prof. Béla Nováky, Szent István University/Hungary; Coordinating Lead Author IPCC

Key impacts, vulnerabilities and adaptation strategies for Europe

Dr. János Mika, Hungarian Meteorological Service, climate expert of the AR4 SPM and TS Hungarian editions

Interfacing climate scenarios to adaptation preparedness in Hungary

Prof. László Csete, Hungarian Academy of Sciences/Hungary & Maria Csete, Budapest University of Technology and Economics

Assessment of the agricultural impacts in Hungary

Q&A

16.00 – 16.30

Coffee break

 

16.30 – 18.00

Panel discussion 2: Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation challenges in Hungary and Europe

Panel chair: Dr. János Mika, Hungarian Meteorological Service

Panelists:

Dr. Gábor Bálint, National Hydrological Forecasting Service/Hungary

Dr. Zsuzsanna Iványi, Regional Environmental Center/Hungary

Prof. Márton Jolánkai, Hungarian Academy of Sciences; Szent István University/Hungary

Prof. Béla Nováky, Szent István University/Hungary; Coordinating Lead Author IPCC

Prof. Pálvölgyi Tamás, Budapest University of Technology and Economics/Hungary

Panelist TBC

 

18.00 – 19.00

Break

 

19.00 – 20.00

19.00 – 20.00

20.00

Keynote address of Dr. Rajendra Pachauri: title to be determined

Prof. Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the IPCC

Reception, Faculty Tower Hall of CEU

 

 

Day 2: April 11, 2008

 

8.30 – 8.50

Arrival and registration: Arrival hall of CEU

 

9.00 – 10.20

9.00 – 9.30

9.30 – 10.00

 

10.00 – 10.20

Opening Session

Chair: Prof. Ogunlade Davidson, Co-Chair of Working Group III

Speakers:

Dr. Renate Christ, Secretary of IPCC

The future of IPCC (topic TBC)

Dr. Bert Metz, Co-Chair of Working Group III

Climate Change Mitigation: Key findings of Fourth Assessment Report

Dr. Csaba Kákosy, Minister for Economy and Transport of Hungary

Challenges to climate change mitigation in the context of economic development

 

10.20 – 10.40

Coffee break

 

10.40 – 13.00

Breakout group discussions: mitigation by sector

10.40 – 11.00

11.00 – 11.20

11.20 – 11.40

11.40 – 13.00

The built environment and infrastructures

Chair: Dr. Leo Meyer, Head of Technical Support Unit, IPCC Working Group III

Speakers:

Prof. Diana Ürge-Vorsatz, CEU/Hungary; Coordinating Lead Author, IPCC

Buildings

Prof. Suzana Kahn Ribeiro, University of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil; Coordinating Lead Author, IPCC

Transport

Hungarian perspective:

discussion panel 3

Panelists:

Prof. Tamás Fleischer, Institute for World Economics/Hungary

Dr. István Heinczinger, MÁV/Hungary

Dr. András Lukács, Levego Munkacsoport

Dr. Aleksandra Novikova, CEU/Hungary; Lead Author, IPCC

Dr. Lászlo Szekér, UIA-MÉSZ work programme/Hungary

Prof. Diana Ürge-Vorsatz, CEU/Hungary; Coordinating Lead Author IPCC

Mitigation policies: energy, industry forest and agriculture sectors

Chair: Prof. emeritus Tamás Jászay, Budapest University of Technology and Economics /Hungary; IPCC Lead Author

Speakers:

Prof. Ralph Sims, International Energy Agency; Coordinating Lead Author, IPCC

Mitigation in Energy Supply

Dr. Jochen Harnisch,

Ecofys/Germany; Lead Author, IPCC

Industry

 

Dr. Frank O’Mara, Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority/Ireland; Lead Author, IPCC

Forestry and Agriculture

Hungarian perspective:

discussion panel 4

Panelists:

Dr. James Atkins, Vertis Environment Finance/Hungary

Prof. Zoltán Somogyi, Forest Research Institute/Hungary, and lead author, IPCC

Dr. László Varró, MOL

Panelist TBC

 

13.00 – 14.00

Lunch break

 

14.00 – 16.00

14.00 – 14.30</p

Panel discussion 5: Challenges for GHG mitigation policies in Hungary

Speaker TBC

Mitigation Policies

Panel chair: Dr. Bert Metz, Co-chair of IPCC Working Group III

Panelists:

Dr. Ada Ámon, Energy Club

Dr. Csaba Nemes/Dr. Jozsef Feiler, MoEW

Panelist TBC

Panelist TBC

 

16.00 – 16.20

Coffee break

16.20 – 17.20

16.20 – 16.40

16.40 – 17.00

17.00 – 17.20

Looking ahead: future directions in climate change science for policy-making

Chair: Dr. Bert Metz, Co-chair of IPCC Working Group III

Speakers:

Prof. Ogunlade Davidson, Co-Chair of Working Group III

GHG Mitigation and Adaptation in the broad context of Sustainable Development

Dr. Leo Meyer, Head of Technical Support Unit, IPCC WGIII, and Program manager, Energy and Climate, Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency

Climate change strategy in the EU: plans, targets, policies

Speaker TBC

Future research questions for IPCC in the European context

 

17.20 – 18.00

Farewell wine reception

Faculty Tower Hall of CEU

   

ABBREVIATIONS:

IPCC – Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

TSU – Technical Support Unit of IPCC

WG I – Working Group I of the IPCC on the Physical Science Basis of Climate Change

WG II – Working Group II of the IPCC on Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability

WG III – Working Group I of the IPCC on Mitigation of Climate Change

CEU – Central European University

MET – Ministry of Economy and Transport of Hungary

MoEW – Ministry of Environment and Water of Hungary

Dear Colleagues,

Please find attached your invitation letter to the IPCC Outreach Event “Climate Change 2007: Implications for Hungary” Key Insights from the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report”.

If you wish to attend the conference, please fill out the registration form and send it back to Ildiko Rull until April 1, 2008 (rulli@ceu.hu).

Thank you.

Diana Urge-Vorsatz, PhD
Professor and Director
Center for Climate Change and Sustainable Energy Policy (3CSEP)
Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy
Central European University
H-1051 Budapest Nador utca 9.
Ph: +36-1-327-3021
Fax: +36-1-327-3031
www.ceu.hu/envsci

IISD Reporting Services’ free newsletters and lists for environment and sustainable development policy professionals at http://www.iisd.ca/email/subscribe.htm

IPCC Outreach Event:

Hungary:10-11 April 2008

bounce-746921-241724@lists.iisd.ca

on behalf of Diana Urge-Vorsatz (vorsatzd@ceu.hu)

Sat 3/22/08

Diana Urge-Vorsatz (vorsatzd@ceu.hu)

Climate Change Info Mailing List (climate-l@lists.iisd.ca)

Sat 3/22/08


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