PALESTINE OPINION RESEACH: MARCH 2008

March 22, 2008 at 10:10 pm | Posted in Arabs, Globalization, History, Israel, Middle East, Palestine, World-system, Zionism | Leave a comment

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Dr. Nabil Kukali

Director of the Palestinian Center

for Public Opinion (PCPO)

 

Contact Persons: Dr. Nabil Kukali & Elias Kukali

Tel: 00970 2 277 4846, Fax: 00970 2 277 4892 Mobile: 00970 599 726 878

P.O. Box 15, Beit Sahour – Palestine

Email: kukali@p-ol.com Website: www.pcpo.ps

Dr. Nabil Kukali (kukali@p-ol.com)

Sat 3/22/08

Publics Around the World Say

Governments Should Act to Prevent Racial

Discrimination

Most Countries See Progress in Racial Equality

Some Do Not

Very large majorities around the world say people of different races and ethnicities should be treated equally. In nearly all countries surveyed, large majorities agree that governments should take action to prevent racial discrimination and in most of them majorities think they need to do more.

In 15 out of 16 countries surveyed, large majorities say that employers should not be allowed to discriminate based on race or ethnicity and that it is the government’s responsibility to stop this from happening.

In 11 of the 16 countries, most believe treatment of different races has grown more equal over the course of their lifetime, but in five countries this is not the case.

These are some of the findings from a poll of 14,896 people in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Africa conducted by WorldPublicOpinion.org, a collaborative research project involving research centers from around the world and managed by the Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA) at the University of Maryland. Interviews were conducted in 16 countries representing 58 percent of the world’s population: Azerbaijan, China, Egypt, France, Great Britain, India, Indonesia, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, the Palestinian territories, Russia, South Korea, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United States. The Palestinian Center for Public Opinion, run by Dr. Nabil Kukali, has been commissioned to conduct the survey in the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and in Gaza Strip. For this purpose, PCPO face-to-face interviewed a random sample consisting of (626) Palestinian adults over (18) years old representing the various demographic specimen in the Palestinian Territories, with a margin of error (±3.92 %).

WorldPublicOpinion.org has released the poll in advance of International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (March 21). This year also marks the 60th anniversary of the UN General Assembly’s adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which declares that all are entitled to the same rights and freedoms, regardless of race, language, religion, sex or other status.

Majorities in all 16 nations consider it important for “people of different races and ethnicities to be treated equally.” In 13 countries, majorities say this is “very important.” On average, 90 percent say that treating people of different races and ethnicities equally is important, with 69 percent saying it is very important.

Majorities around the world also agree that governments should act to ensure that minorities are treated equally. On average, 79 percent agree that the government “should make an effort to prevent discrimination based on a person’s race or ethnicity,” while just 12 percent feel that the government should not be involved.

Only in India does less than half of the public (46%) favor government action. Seventeen percent oppose such action while large numbers are uncertain.

In 10 of the 16 nations polled, the most common view is that governments should do more than it is to prevent racial and ethnic discrimination. On average across all nations polled, 54 percent say the government should do more, while 22 percent feel it is already doing enough. Just 5 percent volunteer that their government already does too much.

In 11 of the 16 nations polled, majorities say that over the course of their lifetime people of different races and ethnicities have come to be treated more equally. On average, 59 percent say people of different races and ethnicities are treated more equally than in the past, including 20 percent who say much more equally? Only 19 percent believe people are treated less equally than before and 14 percent say there has been no real change.

The United States and Indonesia have the largest majorities (82% in both) saying that racial and ethnic majorities enjoy greater equality than in the past, followed by Britain (79%), China (78%), and Iran (76%). The United States (42%), Britain (39%), and China (34%) have the largest percentages saying such minorities are treated “much more equally.”

Palestinians are the one public that does not perceive such progress. A majority of Palestinians (54%) say people of different races and ethnicities are now treated less equally than in the past while only 27 percent say they get better treatment.

Views are mixed about whether minorities are treated more equally in four countries: Nigeria (43% more equal, 45% less equal, 10% no change) and three former Soviet states, Ukraine (36% more equal, 11% less, 38% no change), Azerbaijan (39% more, 19% less, 31% no change) and Russia (more 37%, less 20%, no change 25%).

Steven Kull, director of WorldPublicOpinion.org, said “While there is near-unanimity around the world that people of different races should be treated equally, perceptions vary across countries on whether racial equality is being realized.”

Majorities in 15 out of 16 nations agree that employers do not have the right to discriminate. Asked whether employers should be allowed to “refuse to hire a qualified person because of the person’s race or ethnicity,” on average three out of four (75%) say employers should not be able to base hiring decisions on race, while just 19 percent believe they should.

The result of the poll in the Palestinian Territories

A large majority of Palestinians believe that equal treatment for people of different races and ethnicities is important. The Palestinians are the only nation where a majority says that people of different races and ethnicities have less equality of treatment than in the past. Two-thirds of Palestinians are supportive of the government making efforts to prevent racial and ethnic discrimination.

Palestinians say overwhelmingly (93%) that it is important for people of different races and ethnicities to be treated equally, including 70% who say this is “very important.”

64% feel the government should try to prevent racial or ethnic discrimination, while only 32% believe that it should not be involved (15%) or that it already does too much (17%).

Only 27% say their generation has seen improvements in the treatment of minorities. A majority (54%) say they are treated “a little less equally” (36%) or “much less equally” (18%). Twelve percent say they are treated the same.

Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Palestinians say that employers should not be allowed to turn down qualified people because of their race or ethnicity. A majority (53%) say the government has a responsibility to try to prevent this.

Comment of Dr. Nabil Kukali on the Results of the World Public Opinion Survey:

Dr. Nabil Kukali (kukali@p-ol.com)

In a commentary made by Dr. Nabil Kukali, Director of the Palestinian Center for Public Opinion (PCPO), on the outcomes of the WPO-survey, Dr. N. Kukali first expressed his sincere appreciation of having chosen the Palestinian Territories by the Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA) at the University of Maryland as one of the 16 countries, on which the survey has been carried out, and for commissioning his center to conduct the poll in the Palestinian Territories. “This is a good sign that the Palestinian Territories will be internationally recognized in the near future as the independent and democratic State of Palestine”, Dr. Kukali said.

He pointed out that, having seen the findings of the survey, the only unpleasant outcome is that a majority of Palestinians (54 %) say people of different races and ethnicities are now treated less equally than in the past, which means an increase in discrimination, whilst only (27 %) say people get better treatment now. Asked about a plausible reason, Dr. Kukali countered:” Whom wonders this outcome if Israel is practicing since more than forty years against the Palestinian people all kinds of racial and ethnic discrimination with its occupation of the Palestinian Territories, imposing a suffocating economical siege, restricting people’s freedom and movement, confiscating their lands and denying the basic national rights of the Palestinians to establish their own independent, democratic State of Palestine on their land ?”.

Dr. Kukali further added that this result should be construed as an indicator to the whole world, that the Palestinian citizen feels unjustly treated, oppressed and frustrated because the world didn’t try enough to be just with him by solving the Arab-Israeli conflict and ending the ominous occupation. As a result, the Palestinian citizen grows more desperate as he experiences the different criteria in dealing with the hot issues around the world.

CONTACT:

Dr. Nabil Kukali (kukali@p-ol.com)

Steven Kull, Director of WorldPublicOpinion.org, +1-202-232-7500

For more information on findings and methods visit: www.WorldPublicOpinion.org

Dr. Nabil Kukali (kukali@p-ol.com)

Sat 3/22/08

GLOBAL FINANCE SEEN AS TRAP: AMIYA KUMAR BAGCHI BOOK CAPTURE & EXCLUDE

March 22, 2008 at 7:31 pm | Posted in Asia, Books, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, India, Research, Third World | Leave a comment

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Capture and Exclude:

Developing Economies and the

Poor in Global Finance

edited by Amiya Kumar Bagchi and

Gary A. Dymski

New Delhi, Tulika Books, 2007, xii,

344 p., tables, figs.

ISBN 81-89487-26-3.

Contents: Acknowledgements. Contributors. I. Themes and trends: developing nations in the age of finance: 1. Global financial integration-I: The overlooked historical context of the current period/Amiya Kumar Bagchi. 2. Global financial integration-II: Exclusion, vulnerability and systemic fragility/Gary A. Dymski. 3. Central Bank ‘autonomy’ in the age of finance: The implications for developing countries/Jayati Ghosh. 4. The illusionism of finance/Prabhat Patnaik. II. Histories of the periphery and of the centre: 5. The facts and fictions of financial architecture: Evidence from the late nineteenth century/Marc Flandreau and Clemens Jobst. 6. The imperial impact on the globalization of Indian finance prior to the First World War: the role of the British colonial exchange banks/John McGuire. 7. Finance and production in the United States, 1928-2001: an empirical note/Porus Olpadwala and Yuri Mansury. 8. Shareholder value maximization, stock market and new technology: Should the US corporate model be the universal standard?/Ajit Singh, Jack Glen, Ann Zammit, Rafael De-Hoyos, Alaka Singh and Bruce Weisse. 9. The globalization of financial exploitation/Gary A. Dymski. III. Insights into the Indian financial structure and experience: 10. Credit risk and bank fragility in the new financial environment/C.P. Chandrasekhar. 11. Stock market development and financing of the corporate sector in India: some recent evidence/Parthapratim Pal. 12. Liberalization of capital inflows and the real exchange rate in India: a VAR analysis/Indrani Chakraborty. IV. Comparisons and lessons: 13. Financial liberalization in Eastern Europe: fortunate fetters or financial underdevelopment?/Adam Hersh and Christian E. Weller. 14. The emerging hubs in central-Eastern Europe, trade blocs and financial cooperation/Giuseppe Tattara. 15. China in the bull shop: dealing with finance after WTO/Sunanda Sen. 16. Finance: lessons for India/Amiya Kumar Bagchi. Index.

“The essays gathered in this book address two broad questions. What are the legacies of the imperial age and the colonial epoch, in the capitalist economy of the present day? And what challenges do global financial dynamics pose for developing countries, and for lower- and middle-income households?

Increasing cross-border economic flows have attracted ever more attention. Ironically, cross-border financial relations are centuries old: they date to the birth of the modern nation-state, and, indeed, emerged under the dual shadows cast by imperialism and colonialism. Under colonialism, the financial flows were asymmetric, almost always flowing from the periphery to the core. This historical fact has a continuity in the world economy’s financial core — the US, Western Europe, Japan and newly emerging urban East Asia, and a few selected regions elsewhere. There, globalization has, in the past quarter-century, provided ever more investment and credit options for firms and consumers with access to what Marx would have called ‘world money’.

But any balance-sheet of the contemporary impacts of cross-border financial flows for nations outside this global core–that is, formerly, colonialized and imperially dominated areas–would look quite different. Certainly, there are global ‘financial citizens’ in these countries, who have benefited from freer global financial flows. But, overall, these nations’ macroeconomics have been compromised by contractionary policies forced on them due to recurrent cross border financial crises; further, many micro-economic tragedies have unfolded in the wake of these macroshocks.

The chapters in this book investigate three interlocking domains: the terrain of ideology about how global financial markets are supposed to work, across nations and across agents; the terrain of institutions and market structures; and the terrain of macro-economic and regulatory policy. Special attention is paid to the situation of India. This book demonstrates that, because asymmetric power rooted in imperialism and exploitation underlies the current era, exclusion and fragility are persistent features of the world in which we live.” (jacket)

Capture and Exclude:

Developing Economies and the Poor in Global Finance

edited by Amiya Kumar Bagchi and Gary A. Dymski

U.S. RELATIONS WITH MUSLIMS: WEBCHAT MARCH 27 2008

March 22, 2008 at 2:07 am | Posted in Globalization, History, Islam, Israel, USA | Leave a comment

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Envoy to Organization of the Islamic

Conference to Discuss Role

America.gov (america-gov@statelists.state.gov)

on behalf of USINFOlistmgr@STATE.GOV

Fri 3/21/08

listmgr@STATE.GOV

AMERICA-GOV@STATELISTS.STATE.GOV

Envoy to Organization of the

Islamic Conference to Discuss

Role

(Ask America webchat March 27 will look at U.S.relations with Muslim world) (308)

Promoting international understanding and peaceful interactions worldwide,the Organization of the Islamic Conference(OIC)is the second-largest intergovernmental organization after the United Nations.

On March 27, at 8:30 a.m. EDT (1230 GMT), chat with Sada Cumber, newly appointed special envoy to the OIC, to discuss his mandate, his thoughts on U.S. relations with the Muslim world, and his early impressions of potential U.S. cooperation with the OIC.

Sada Cumber was appointed special envoy to the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) on March 3. He serves as the U.S. representative to the OIC, seeking to promote mutual understanding and dialogue between the United States and Muslim communities around the world. Before his appointment, Cumber was an entrepreneur and investor based in Austin,Texas. He has founded 11 technology-based companies, including Texas Global, an international strategic advising firm, and CACH Capital Management, an investment advisory and wealth management firm. Cumber was born in Karachi,Pakistan,in 1951 and holds a bachelor’s degree in commerce and a master’s degree in history from the University of Karachi.

He came to the United States in 1978 and has been an American citizen since 1986.

If you would like to participate in this webchat,please sign up on the Ask America webchat registration page

(http://webchat.state.gov/?tid=unsecure.login&language=english).

Please tell us your preferred screen name; use of full names is not required.

If you have participated in one of our previous webchats, use the same e-mail.

We accept questions and comments in advance of, and at any time during,the program.

You may also e-mail

(usinfowebchat@state.gov)

questions without registering.

The transcript of this webchat will be available on Ask America’s webchat page

(http://www.america.gov/multimedia/askamerica.html#yates_17_jan_2008), where information about upcoming webchats is also available.

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S.Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

 

Envoy to Organization of the Islamic Conference to Discuss Role

America.gov (america-gov@statelists.state.gov)

on behalf of USINFOlistmgr@STATE.GOV

Fri 3/21/08

listmgr@STATE.GOV

AMERICA-GOV@STATELISTS.STATE.GOV

Fri 3/21/08


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