JOURNAL OF COMMERCE CONFERENCES: TRANS-PACIFIC MARITIME

November 21, 2006 at 9:39 pm | Posted in Asia, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, Science & Technology | Leave a comment

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The Journal of

Commerce CONFERENCES

Invitation to the 7th Annual Trans-Pacific Maritime Conference

7th Annual Trans-Pacific Maritime
Conference

March 5 & 6, 2007 ~ Long Beach,
California ~ USA

JoC Conferences events@joc.com

website:www.joc.com/conferences/tpm

Tuesday, November 21, 2006

The TPM conference, launched in 2001 and now in its
7th year, has grown rapidly into the most important annual gathering for senior
executives from shippers, carriers, 3PLs, ports, terminals, railroads and other key
players in the trans-Pacific trade. The event is held in early March as shippers and
carriers gear up for annual contract negotiations, and the agenda is packed with the most
knowledgeable and experienced speakers addressing the broad range of issues in this
important global trade lane.

The 2007 TPM conference will focus on a number of major
issues currently confronting shippers in the trans-Pacific, including the launch of the
next contracting cycle for ILWU negotiations, freight rates and supply and demand of
vessel capacity, West Coast port capacity rail intermodal capacity and congestion, and new
mandates for supply chain security.

Subjects that will be addressed at TPM 2007:
– Market Outlook for the Trans-Pacific
Trade
– West Coast Gateways
– Intermodal Economics 101
– Inland Port Intermodal (IPI) or Transload?
– A Trans-Pacific Exporters Issues
– West Coast Longshore Labor: A New Contract Cycle Begins
– Environmental Policy

Speakers you will hear from at TPM 2007:
– Keynote Address: Ron Widdows,
Chief Executive Officer, APL Ltd.

An outspoken advocate for improving the transportation system, veteran container
executive Ron Widdows will offer a candid and comprehensive discussion on the state of the
trans-Pacific and its development in 2007 and beyond. His talk will cover the broader
environment and the dynamics that are, and will, affect this major trade lane well into
the future.

PLUS

  • Peter Keller, Senior Vice President, NYK Line
  • Steven Rothberg, Managing Director & Principal, Liner Shipping Practice, Mercator
    Transport LLC
  • Andrew Penfold, Principal, Ocean Shipping Consultants PLC
  • John Beasley, Director Transportation & Import Logistics, Jarden Consumer Solutions
  • Steve Branscum, Group Vice President, Consumer Products, BNSF Railway Company
  • Rob Shepard, Director of Transportation and Logistics, The Kraft Group
  • Ed Zaninelli, Vice President, Westbound Trade, OOCL
  • Jim McKenna, President, Pacific Maritime Association
  • Robert McEllrath, President, ILWU
  • Joan M. Padduck, Director, Global Trade Systems Inc. and former logistics director for
    Staples and Reebok
  • Allen “Al” Thompson, Vice President, Global Supply Chain Policy, Retail
    Industry Leaders Association
  • Gill Hicks, President, Gill V. Hicks and Associations and former managing director,
    Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority

and many more…

Visit the official TPM show

website:www.joc.com/conferences/tpm

WHEN

Monday, March 5, 2007 7:30 AM –

Tuesday, March 6, 2007 5:00 PM

Pacific Time Zone

WHERE

LB Convention Center & Hyatt Regency LB

300 E. Ocean Boulevard & 200 S. Pine Ave

Long Beach, CA 90802

USA

Invitation to the 7th Annual Trans-Pacific Maritime Conference

events@joc.com

JoC Conferences events@joc.com

Tuesday, November 21, 2006

BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS BIS REVIEW NOS. 113-112: INDIA

November 21, 2006 at 7:38 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, India, Research | Leave a comment

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Bank for International Settlements

BIS Review

http://www.bis.org/review/index.htm

Press, Service Press.Service@bis.org

Please find BIS Review No 113 attached as an Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file.

Alternatively, you can access this BIS
Review
on the

Bank for International Settlements’ website by
clicking on

http://www.bis.org/review/index.htm

What’s included?

BIS Review No 113 (21 November 2006)

Klaus Liebscher
: The changing landscape of FDI in Europe
Michael C Bonello: Policy challenges beyond the euro
Lucas Papademos: The extended importance of the euro
Rakesh Mohan: Monetary and
financial policy responses to global imbalances

Rakesh Mohan: Economic growth, financial deepening and financial
inclusion
______________________________

If you would like to be taken off the list to receive BIS Reviews,

or if you would like to add or change an address, 

please e-mail press.service@bis.org

Please find BIS Review No 112 attached as an Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file.

Alternatively, you can access this BIS
Review
on the

Bank for International Settlements’ website by
clicking on

http://www.bis.org/review/index.htm

What’s included?

BIS Review No 112 (20 November
2006)

Mervyn King: Monetary policy developments
John Gieve: Practical issues in preparing for cross-border
financial crises
Kazumasa Iwata: The role of money and monetary policy in Japan
Rakesh Mohan:
Economic reforms in India – where are we and where do we go?

Randall S Kroszner: The conquest of
worldwide inflation – currency competition and its implications for interest rates and the
yield curve

______________________________

If you would like to be taken off the list to receive BIS Reviews,

or if you would like to add or change an address,

please e-mail press.service@bis.org

BIS Review No 112 available

“Publications, Service” Publications@bis.org

Press, Service Press.Service@bis.org

Monday, November 20, 2006

EDGE 197

November 21, 2006 at 1:34 pm | Posted in Books, Globalization, History, Philosophy, Research, Science & Technology | Leave a comment

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EDGE 197

EDGE 197

http://www.edge.org

Published by EDGE Foundation, Inc., 5 East 59th Street, New York, NY 10022

November 20, 2006

Edge editor@edge.org

November 20, 2006

EDGE 197
at
http://www.edge.org

[14,650 words]

This EDGE edition, at 14,100 words with links, is available online at: http://www.edge.org/documents/archive/edge197.html

—————————————————-
THE THIRD CULTURE
—————————————————-
BEYOND REDUCTIONISM
Reinventing The Sacred
By Stuart A. Kauffman

Two fine authors, Richard Dawkins and Daniel Dennett, have written recent books, The God Delusion and Breaking the Spell arguing against religion. Their views are based on contemporary science. But the
largest convictions of contemporary science remain based on reductionism.

I would like to begin a discussion about the first glimmerings of a new scientific world
view — beyond reductionism to emergence and radical creativity in the biosphere and
human world. This emerging view finds a natural scientific place for value and ethics, and
places us as co-creators of the enormous web of emerging complexity that is the evolving
biosphere and human economics and culture. In this scientific world view, we can ask: Is
it more astonishing that a God created all that exists in six days, or that the natural
processes of the creative universe have yielded galaxies, chemistry, life, agency,
meaning, value, consciousness, culture without a Creator. In my mind and heart, the
overwhelming answer is that the truth as best we know it, that all arose with no Creator
agent, all on its wondrous own, is so awesome and stunning that it is God enough for me
and I hope much of humankind.

The Reality Club: Jaron Lanier

—————————————————-
RICHARD DAWKINS.NET

Richard Dawkins
I’M AN ATHEIST, BUT . . .

Of all the questions I fielded during the course of my recent book tour, the only ones
that really depressed me were those that began "I’m an atheist, BUT . . ." What
follows such an opening is nearly always unhelpful, nihilistic or – worse –
suffused with a sort of exultant negativity. Notice, by the way, the distinction from
another favourite genre: "I used to be an atheist, but . . ." That is one of the
oldest tricks in the book, practised by, among many others, C S Lewis, Alister McGrath and
Francis Collins. It is designed to gain street cred before the writer starts on about
Jesus, and it is amazing how often it works. Look out for it, and be forewarned.

I’ve noticed five variants of I’m-an-atheist-buttery, and I’ll list them in turn, in the
hope that others will recognize them, be armed against them, and perhaps extend the list
by contributing examples from their own experience.

1. I’m an atheist, but religion is here to stay. You think you can get rid of religion?
Good luck to you! You want to get rid of religion? What planet are you living on? Religion
is a fixture. Get over it!
I could bear any of these downers, if they were uttered in something approaching a tone of
regret or concern. On the contrary. The tone of voice is almost always gleeful, and
accompanied by a self-satisfied smirk. Anybody who opens with "I’m an atheist, BUT .
. ." can be more or less guaranteed to be one of those religious fellow-travellers
who, in Dan Dennett’s wickedly perceptive phrase, believes in belief. They may not be
religious themselves, but they love the idea that other people are religious. This brings
me to my second category of naysayers.

2. I’m an atheist, but people need religion. What are you going to put in its place? How
are you going to comfort the bereaved? How are you going to fill the need?

. . . Did you notice the patronizing condescension in the quotations I just listed? You
and I, of course, are much too intelligent and well educated to need religion. But
ordinary people, hoi polloi, the Orwellian proles, the Huxleian Deltas and Epsilon
semi-morons, need religion. Well, I want to cultivate more respect for people than that. I
suspect that the only reason many cling to religion is that they have been let down by our
educational system and don’t understand the options on offer. This is certainly true of
most people who think they are creationists. They have simply not been taught the
alternative. Probably the same is true of the belittling myth that people ‘need’ religion.
On the contrary, I am tempted to say "I believe in people . . ." And this leads
me to the next example. . . .

—————————————————-
HARVARD CRIMSON

LESS FAITH, MORE REASON
By Steven Pinker

It is an American anachronism, I think, in an era in which the rest of the West is moving
beyond it.

There is much to praise in the new Report of the Committee on General Education. It is
original, thoughtful, and well-written, and reflects considerable work on the part of our
colleagues on the Task Force on General Education. The entire Harvard community should be
grateful for the progress they have made and the issues they have asked us to address.

…The report introduces scientific knowledge as follows: "Science and technology
directly affect our students in many ways, both positive and negative: they have led to
life-saving medicines, the internet, more efficient energy storage, and digital
entertainment; they also have shepherded nuclear weapons, biological warfare agents,
electronic eavesdropping, and damage to the environment."

Well, yes, and I suppose one could say that architecture has produced both museums and gas
chambers, that opera has both uplifted audiences and inspired the Nazis, and so on. It
makes it sound as if the choice between science and technology on the one hand, and
superstition and ignorance on the other, is a moral toss-up! Of course students should
know about both the bad and good effects of technology. But this hardly seems like the
best way for a great university to justify the teaching of science.

The report goes on to emphasize the relevance of science to current concerns like global
warming and stem-cell research. It even mandates that courses which fulfill the Science
and Technology requirement "frame this material in the context of social issues"
(a stipulation that is absent from other requirements). But surely there is more to being
knowledgeable in science than being able to follow the news. And surely our general
science courses should aim to be more than semester-long versions of "An Inconvenient
Truth."

… My second major reservation concerns the "Reason and Faith" requirement.

First, the word "faith" in this and many other contexts, is a euphemism for
"religion." An egregious example is the current administration’s
"faith-based initiatives," so-named because it is more palatable than
"religion-based initiatives." A university should not try to hide what it is
studying in warm-and-fuzzy code words. Second, the juxtaposition of the two words makes it
sound like "faith" and "reason" are parallel and equivalent ways of
knowing, and we have to help students navigate between them. But universities are about
reason, pure and simple. Faith—believing something without good reasons to do
so—has no place in anything but a religious institution, and our society has no
shortage of these. Imagine if we had a requirement for "Astronomy and Astrology"
or "Psychology and Parapsychology." It may be true that more people are
knowledgeable about astrology than about astronomy, and it may be true that astrology
deserves study as a significant historical and sociological phenomenon. But it would be a
terrible mistake to juxtapose it with astronomy, if only for the false appearance of
symmetry. …

—————————————————-
MY GOD PROBLEM
By Natalie Angier

So, on the issue of mainstream monotheistic religions and the irrationality behind many of
religion’s core tenets, scientists often set aside their skewers, their snark, and their
impatient demand for proof, and instead don the calming cardigan of a a kiddie-show host
on public television. They reassure the public that religion and science are not at odds
with one another, but rather that they represent separate "magisteria," in the
words of the formerly alive and even more formerly scrappy Stephen Jay Gould. Nobody is
going to ask people to give up their faith, their belief in an everlasting soul
accompanied by an immortal memory of every soccer game their kids won, every moment they
spent playing fetch with the dog. Nobody is going to mock you for your religious beliefs.
Well, we might if you base your life decisions on the advice of a Ouija board; but if you
want to believe that someday you’ll be seated at a celestial banquet with your long-dead
father to your right and Jane Austen to your left-and that she’ll want to talk to you for
another hundred million years or more—that’s your private reliquary, and we’re not
here to jimmy the lock.

—————————————————-
EDGE IN THE NEWS
—————————————————-
THE SUNDAY TIMES (London)
The Galileo effect: dangerous ideas waiting to happen

A group of scientists has been given freedom to express heretical theories. Steve Farrar
reports

Scientists and empirical thinkers have always generated dangerous ideas as they wrestle
with evidence and theories that appear to contradict conventional wisdom and widely
accepted social mores. Dawkins sees this as healthy for society. "Dangerous ideas are
what has driven humanity onward, usually to the consternation of the majority in any
particular age who thrive on familiarity and fear change," he says. "Yesterday’s
dangerous idea is today’s orthodoxy and tomorrow’s cliché." He adds, however, that
it is patently not enough for an idea just to be dangerous. It must also be good.

It was, of course, a particularly good idea to bring this remarkable group of scientists
and thinkers together. Few would have been capable of doing so. But not for nothing has
Brockman been described by Dawkins as having "the most enviable address book in the
English-speaking world". More than that, though, he has an insatiable hunger for
ideas and intellectual debate. Back in the 1960s, when Brockman was working alongside the
likes of Bob Dylan, Andy Warhol and Hunter S Thompson as an avant-garde arts promoter, he
was invited regularly to dine and debate with John Cage, the composer and philosopher, and
a small group of fiercely bright young artists and scientists. The experience had a
profound impact on him. "Out of that I got an appreciation for almost the purity of
ideas and the excitement of rubbing shoulders with people that could challenge you,"
he says.

—————————————————-
THE SUNDAY HERALD (Glascow)
Lethal Minds — Thinking that could rock the world.

PERILS OF WISDOM

We talk about thinking out of the box but some ideas don’t even get off the ground because
of cultural taboos or political correctness. Here, five experts – including Richard
Dawkins – propose the unthinkable …

… Today’s most shocking proposals are those that provoke outrage: not among the
religious or political establishments, but in the heart of every well-meaning,
peace-loving, Make Poverty History-marching denizen of the world. Dangerous ideas,
according to psychologist Steven Pinker, "are denounced not because they are
self-evidently false, nor because they advocate harmful action, but because they are
thought to corrode the prevailing moral order" and "challenge the collective
decency of an age".

—————————————————-
SALON
The sexiest man living!

Forget that other list. We pick the men who really set our hearts aflame — and there’s
nary a pretty-boy actor among them.

Wonder is sexy. Knowledge is sexy. And embodying both as much as any man in the world
today is a man in a tweed jacket riding his bike around the Oxford University campuses,
the damp English breeze sweeping a curtain of silver hair from the delicate bones of his
face. Yes, those cheekbones, those piercing eyes, that pursed bow of a mouth — but that
brain, oh that brain, oh, god, that brain — is what makes Richard Dawkins, evolutionary
biologist and the most famous atheist in the world, the sexiest man around.

—————————————————-
PHILADELPHIA
INNQUIRER

Things We Like

Book, nonfiction: "What We Believe but Cannot Prove," edited by John Brockman.
The editor, who also runs the very influential Web site Edge (http://www.edge.org), asks
some of the most brilliant people in the world one heck of a good question.

—————————————————-
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN
The Evolution of Future
Wealth
Technologies evolve much as species do, and that underappreciated fact is the key to
growth
By Stuart A. Kauffman

As economics attempts to
model increasingly complicated phenomena, however, it would do well to shift its attention
from physics to biology, because the biosphere and the living things in it represent the
most complex systems known in nature. In particular, a deeper understanding of how species
adapt and evolve may bring profound–even revolutionary–insights into business
adaptability and the engines of economic growth.

—————————————————-
ARTS & LETTERS
DAILY

Essay & Opinion

In the 15th century, an emerging middle class had the portrait as a means of public
exposure, says Hubert Burda. Today, it’s YouTube. Some things never change…

—————————————————-
NEWSWEEK
Losing Our Religion
By Jerry Adler

… If one thing emerged from the "Beyond Belief" conference at the Salk
Institute in LaJolla, Calif. it’s that religion doesn’t work the same way. Some 30
scientists—one of the greatest collections of religious skeptics ever assembled in
one place since Voltaire dined alone—examined faith from the evolutionary,
neurological and philosophical points of view, and they concluded that some things only
work if you do believe in them. Richard Dawkins, the British evolutionary biologist and
author of the best-selling book "The God Delusion," said he couldn’t have a
spiritual experience even when he tried. After another panelist, neuroscientist V.S.
Ramachandran of the University of California, San Diego, explained that temporal-lobe
seizures of the brain create profound spiritual and out-of-body experiences, Dawkins
disclosed that he had participated in an experiment that was supposed to mimic such
seizures—and even then he didn’t feel a thing….

—————————————————-
THE REALITY CLUB
—————————————————-

Douglas Rushkoff, Yossi Vardi, Jaron Lanier on Hubert Burda’s "How We See
Ourselves"

Jaron Lanier on Stuart Kauffman’s "Beyond Reductionism"
—————————————————-
—————————————————-
This EDGE edition, at 14,100 words, with links, is available online at: http://www.edge.org/documents/archive/edge197.html

—————————————————-
EDGE
John Brockman, Editor and Publisher
Russell Weinberger, Associate Publisher
Karla Taylor, Editorial Assistant
EDGE Foundation, Inc.

Published by EDGE Foundation, Inc., 5 East 59th Street, New York, NY 10022

EDGE Foundation, Inc. is a nonprofit private operating foundation under Section 501(c)(3)
of the Internal Revenue Code.

Edge 197: Stuart Kauffman, Richard Dawkins, Steven Pinker, Natalie Angier

Edge editor@edge.org

editor@edge.org

Mon, 20 Nov 2006

BRITISH IMPERIAL FICTION: H. RIDER HAGGARD’S ZULUS AND JEWS

November 21, 2006 at 12:52 pm | Posted in Africa, Books, Globalization, History, Literary | Comments Off on BRITISH IMPERIAL FICTION: H. RIDER HAGGARD’S ZULUS AND JEWS

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H. Rider Haggard

June 22, 1856May 14, 1925

While his novels contain many of the strong preconceptions common to the culture of
British colonialism, they are unusual for the degree of sympathy with which he often
treats the native populations. Africans often serve heroic roles in his novels, though the
protagonists are typically, though not invariably, European. A notable example is Ignosi,
the rightful king of Kukuanaland in
King Solomon’s Mines. Having developed
an intense mutual friendship with the three Englishmen who help him reclaim his throne, he
wisely accepts their advice to abolish witch hunts and arbitrary capital punishment.

Some of Haggard’s opinions, especially his
belief of a Jewish world wide conspiracy, have shadowed his later reputation and otherwise
open-minded approach to foreign cultures.

While his novels contain many of the strong preconceptions common to the culture of
British colonialism, they are unusual for the degree of sympathy with which he often
treats the native populations. Africans often serve heroic roles in his novels, though the
protagonists are typically, though not invariably, European. A notable example is Ignosi,
the rightful king of Kukuanaland in
King Solomon’s Mines. Having
developed an intense mutual friendship with the three Englishmen who help him reclaim his
throne, he wisely accepts their advice to abolish witch hunts and arbitrary capital
punishment.

Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856May 14, 1925),
born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure
novels
set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England.

Haggard had some firsthand experience of these locations, thanks to his extensive
travels. He first travelled to Natal Colony in 1875, as secretary to the colonial Governor Bulwer. It was in this role that
Haggard was present in Pretoria for the official announcement
of the British annexation of the Boer Republic of the Transvaal. In fact, Haggard was forced to read out much of the proclamation following the loss of voice of the official
originally entrusted with the duty.

In 1878 he became Registrar of
the High Court in the Transvaal, in the region that was to become part of South Africa. He was eventually to return to England to find
a wife, bringing Mariana Louisa Margitson back to Africa with him as a bride. Later they
had a son named Jock (who died of measles at the age of 10) and three daughters.

Returning again to England in 1882, the couple settled in Ditchingham, Norfolk. Later he
lived in Kessingland and had connections with the church
in Bungay, Suffolk. He turned to the study of law and
was called to the bar in 1884.
His practice of law was somewhat desultory, and much of his time was taken up by the
writing of novels.

While his novels contain many of the strong preconceptions common to the culture of
British colonialism, they are unusual for the degree of sympathy with which he often
treats the native populations. Africans often serve heroic roles in his novels, though the
protagonists are typically, though not invariably, European. A notable example is Ignosi,
the rightful king of Kukuanaland in
King Solomon’s Mines. Having
developed an intense mutual friendship with the three Englishmen who help him reclaim his
throne, he wisely accepts their advice to abolish witch hunts and arbitrary capital
punishment.

Haggard is most famous as the author of the best-selling novel King Solomon’s Mines, as well as many others
such as She, Ayesha
(sequel to She), Allan Quatermain
(sequel to King Solomon’s Mines), and the
epic Viking romance, Eric
Brighteyes
.

In She, a Cambridge professor, Horace Holly and his adopted son, Leo Vincey
travel to Africa. They encounter a white queen, Ayesha who has made herself immortal by
bathing in a pillar of fire, the source of life itself. She becomes the prototypical all
powerful female figure. She is to be both desired and feared. She is a breathtakingly
beautiful creature who will not hesitate to kill any one who displeases her or stands in
her way. The travelers discover that Ayesha has been waiting for 2000 years for the
reincarnation of her lover Kallikrates, whom she had slain in a fit of jealous rage. She
believes that Vincey is the reincarnation of Kallikrates.

In the climax of the novel, Ayesha takes the two men to see the pillar of fire. She
wants Leo to bathe in it as she did so that he can become immortal and remain with her
forever. His doubts about its safety lead her to step into the flames once more. However,
with this second immersion she reverts to her true age and immediately withers and dies.
Before dying she tells Vincey;”I die not. I shall come again.”

Throughout the book Haggard explores the themes of power, life, death, reincarnation,
sexuality, and fate.

Though Haggard is no longer as popular as he was when his books appeared, some of his
characters have had a notable impact on early-twentieth-century thought. Ayesha, the
female protagonist of She, was even cited by both Sigmund
Freud
in The Interpretation of Dreams
and by Carl Jung as a female prototype. Allan Quatermain, the hero of
King Solomon’s Mines and its sequel still
appears in Western popular
culture
today. As a populariser of the Lost World genre
Haggard has had a wide influence on the spheres of science
fiction
and fantasy through the works of Edgar
Rice Burroughs
. Allan Quatermain has been identified as one of the fictitious and real
people on whom
Indiana Jones,
in the films Raiders of the Lost Ark,
the Temple of Doom and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
is said to be based.

Haggard also wrote on social issues and agricultural
reform
, in part inspired by his experiences in Africa but also based
on what he saw in Europe.

Chronology of works

  • Dawn (1884)
  • The Witch’s Head (1884)
  • King Solomon’s
    Mines
    (1885)
  • She (1887)
  • Jess (1887)
  • Allan Quatermain
    (1887)
  • A Tale of Three Lions (1887)
  • Mr. Meeson’s Will (1888)
  • Maiwa’s Revenge (1888)
  • My Fellow Laborer and the Wreck of the Copeland (1888)
  • Colonel Quaritch, V.C. (1888)
  • Cleopatra (book)
    (1889)
  • Allan’s Wife (1889)
  • Beatrice (1890)
  • The World’s Desire
    (1890) (co-written with Andrew Lang)
  • Eric Brighteyes
    (1891)
  • Nada
    the Lily
    (1892)
  • Montezuma’s
    Daughter
    (1893)
  • The People of the Mist
    (1894)
  • Joan Haste (1895)
  • Heart of the World (1895)
  • Church and State (1895)
  • The Wizard (1896)
  • Dr. Therne (1898)
  • Swallow (1898)
  • A Farmer’s Year
    (1899)
  • The Last Boer War
    (1899)
  • The Spring of Lion (1899)
  • Montezuma’s Daughter (1899)
  • Elissa; the doom of Zimbabwe. Black Heart and White Heart; a Zulu idyll. (1900)
  • The New South Africa (1900)
  • A Winter Pilgrimage (1901)
  • Lysbeth (1901)
  • Rural
    England
    (1902)
  • Pearl Maiden (1903)
  • Stella Fregelius (1904)
  • The Brethren (1904)
  • The Poor and the Land (1905)
  • Ayesha (1905)
  • A Gardener’s Year (1905)
  • Report of Salvation Army Colonies (1905)
  • The Way of the Spirit (1906)
  • Benita (1906)
  • Fair Margaret (1907)
  • The Ghost Kings (1908)
  • The Yellow God (1908)
  • The Lady of Blossholme (1909)
  • Queen Sheba’s Ring
    (1910)
  • Regeneration: An account of the social work of the Salvation Army (1910)
  • Morning Star (1910)
  • Red
    Eve
    (1911)
  • The Mahatma and the Hare (1911)
  • Rural Denmark (1911)
  • Marie (1912)
  • Child of Storm (1913)
  • The Wanderer’s Necklace (1914)
  • A call to Arms (1914)
  • The Holy Flower (1915)
  • After the War Settlement and Employment of Ex-Service Men
    (1916)
  • The Ivory Child (1916)
  • Finished (1917)
  • Love Eternal (1918)
  • Moon of Israel (1918)
  • When the World Shook (1919)
  • The Ancient Allan
    (1920)
  • Smith and the Pharaohs (1920)
  • She and Allan (1921)
  • The Virgin of the Sun (1922)
  • Wisdom’s Daughter (1923)
  • Heu-Heu (1924)
  • Queen of the Dawn
    (1925)
  • The Days of my Life: An autobiography of Sir H. Rider Haggard (1926)
  • Treasure of the Lake (1926)
  • Allan and the Ice Gods
    (1927)
  • Mary of Marion Isle (1929)
  • Belshazzar (1930)

Allan Quatermain Series

  • King Solomon’s
    Mines
  • Allan Quatermain
  • Allan’s Wife
  • Maiwa’s Revenge: or, The War of the Little Hand
  • Marie
  • Child of Storm
  • (Allan and) The Holy Flower
  • Finished
  • The Ivory Child
  • The Ancient Allan
  • She and Allan
  • Heu-heu: or The Monster
  • The Treasure of the Lake
  • Allan and the Ice-gods

Ayesha Series

External links

Wikisource has original works written by or about: H. Rider Haggard

See also

Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._Rider_Haggard

Prolific English writer, who published colorful novels set in unknown regions and lost
kingdoms of Africa, or some other corner of the world: Iceland, Constantinople, Mexico,
Ancient Egypt. Haggard’s best-known work is the romantic adventure tale KING SOLOMON’S
MINES (1885), which was inspired by
Robert
Louis Stevenson
‘s famous Treasure Island.
Haggard also was an agricultural reformer and a faithful servant of the British Empire.
However, his depiction of other cultures has been considered more complex than was common
in contemporary popular romances.

“Welcome, white men from the stars,” he said; “this is a different sight
from what your eyes gazed on by the light of last night’s moon, but it is not so good a
sight. Girls are pleasant, and were it not for such as these” (and he pointed round
him) “we should none of us be here to- day; but men are better. Kisses and the tender
words of women are sweet, but the sound of the clashing of men’s spears, and the smell of
men’s blood, are sweeter far! Would ye have wives from among our people, white men? If so,
choose the fairest here, and ye shall have them, as many as ye will;” and he paused
for an answer.’ (from King Solomon’s Mines)

Henry Rider Haggard was born in West Bradenham Hall, Norfolk, as
the eight son of William Haggard, a barrister and a country squire, and Ella (Doventon)
Haggard, an amateur writer. In his childhood, the young Henry Rider was seen as the family
dunce by his father. Haggard was not sent to a good public school like his brothers, but
he was educated at a London day-school, although privately, and Ipswich Grammar School.
After failing the army entrance, Haggard went in 1875 to Natal as a secretary to Sir Henry
Bulwer, Governor of Natal colony. In 1877 he joined the staff of the special commissioner.
Next year he became Master and Registrar of the High Court in the Transvaal.
For the rest of his life Haggard viewed with understanding the
British colonial policy, sharing in this the attitudes of his friend
Rudyard Kipling.
On the other hand, he also traveled widely and saw the dangers of European intrusion. Thus
in the end of King Solomon’s Mines Haggard left the lost land of the Kukuanas to
continue its own separate development.

During his years in Africa, Haggard got acquainted with the Zulu
culture
. Especially he admired the individual prowess of their warriors: “When
death comes, he meets it without fear, and goes to the spirits of his fathers boldly, as a
warrior should.” Although Haggard himself had been brought up to believe in the
superiority of European culture and the Christian religion, he did not condemn the
polygamic system of the Zulus, writing that “the Zulu women are much attached to the
custom, nor would they as a general rule consent to marry a man who only proposed taking
one wife.”

Psychoanalytic interpretations of Haggard’s novels have paid much attention to his
female characters. Among his devoted reader was
Carl
Jung
, who used the novel SHE (1887) as an
example of anima. According to Jung, the anima is an archetypical form, expressing
the fact that a man has a minority of female genes. Haggard’s Queen Ayesha is an
unmistakable anima type – the ultimate guide and mediator to the inner world. The idea has
also connections with the oservations of
James
Frazer
in his classical study The Golden
Bough
. Also Haggard’s idea of a journey into the “darkest Africa”, which
turns into a spiritual search, has been used my a number of writers, including Joseph
Conrad in Heart of Darkness (1902).

The narrator of the hallucinatory She is Ludwig Horace Holly. The story depicts
an adventurer, Leo Vincey, who receives a mysterious legacy from his father. He goes to
Africa to search the truth behind the death of an ancestor, Kallikrates. He was an
Egyptian priest slain by an ancient sorceress She-Who-Must-Be Oboyed, queen Ayesha, a
2000-year-old ruler of the Lost World of Kôr. With his friends Leo travels through
dangerous regions and reaches catacombs of the Kingdom of Kôr. There they encounter She,
the white Queen of the Amahagger people. “I could clearly distinguish, however, that
the swathed mummy-like form before me was that of a tall and lovely woman, instinct with
beauty in every part, and also with a certain snake-like grace which I had never seen
anything to equal before.” She tells that her name is Ayesha. “My empire is of
thye imagination,” she says. Holly tries to teach her doctrines of Christianity but
she answers: “The religions come and the religions pass, and civilizations come and
pass, and naught endures but the world and human nature.” She saves the life of Leo
who is dying – he was wounded in a fight with cannibals. Ayesha sees in him Kallikrates.
She promises to make him live forever if they walk together into a pillar of flame. Ayesha
enters the Fire of Life at the heart of an volcano, and emerges from it immeasurably old.
She dies and asks Leo to remember her in her eternal youth and beauty.
“‘Kallikrates,’ she said in husky, trembling notes. ‘Forget me not, Kallikrates. Have
pity on my shame; I die not. I shall come again, and shall once more be beautiful, I swear
it – it is true!'” Ayesha disintegrates, she is swept back to nothingness. – The
story was followed by two sequels, AYESHA (1905), in which Haggards asked, “Who and
what was Ayesha, nay – what is Ayesha?” and WISDOM’S DAUGHTER (1923).

After Haggard returned to England, he married in 1880 a Norfolk heiress, Mariana Louisa
Margitson. They moved to Transvaal to Haggard’s ostrich farm. When Transvaal had to be
ceded to the Dutch, they went back to England, where Haggard continued his law studies.
The death of his son in 1891 was a deep blow for him. Haggard was admitted to the bar in
1884, but showed little interest in practicing his profession – he had other plans.

After retiring to a Norfolk country house, Haggard devoted himself into writing. He had
earlier published a study of contemporary African history. His first books, DAWN (1884)
and THE WITCH’S TALE (1884), were undistinguished. According to a story, when R.L.
Stevenson’s Treasure Island appeared in book form in 1883, Haggard did not think
much of it, and made a five-shilling bet with his brother, that he could write better one.
The outcome, created in six weeks, was
King
Solomon’s Mines
, a story of a group of treasure hunters searching legendary diamond
mine in a lost land. In the story Sir Henry Curtis, Captain John Good and the veteran
hunter Allan Quatermain, accompanied by Umbopa, their native servant, set off to reveal
the fate of Curtis’s missing brother – he has gone to look for the treasure of King
Solomon in the land of Kukuanas. They
cross terrifying deserts, nearly freeze in the mountains, and after a long journey they
reach their destination. Umbopa turns out to be a king, and he wins the villainous King
Twala, who dies in the combat with Curtis. The adventurers find Solomon’s mines, but are
left to die in an underground vault by Gagool, the horrific witch-doctor. After an escape
they find Curtis’s brother and return to the civilization.

The adventure tale became a sensation and Haggard’s book has been in print ever since. Haggard repeated his success with three novels set in Africa
She
, JESS, and ALLAN QUATERMAIN, all published in 1887. In Allan Quatermain the
heroes from King Solomon’s Mines, Sir Henry Curtis and Captain John Good, return to
Africa disillusioned with Western culture.
Accompanied by Allan
Quotermain they journey to the lost land of Zu-Vendis, where Curtis becomes a king and
Quatermain dies. However, Quatermain appeared again in several other novels.
In ALLAN AND THE ICE-GODS (1927) the hero ingests a
hallucinogenic drug and finds his mind transported to the body of a prehistoric caveman.
The author’s fantasy and myth-making later inspired several film directors. Allan
Quatermain
(1987), directed by Gary Nelson, was a follow up to 1985’s King
Solomon’s Mines
(1985), directed J. Lee-Thompson and starring Richard Chamberlain and
Sharon Stone. The favorite adventure novel has been filmed half a dozen times, but none of
the films have captured the spirit of Haggard’s original work.

At the age of thirty-four, Haggard had become a household name. He published one to
three books a year, in which the setting ranged from Iceland to the South Seas. Haggard
also tried his hand in several forms of the novel: psychological (MR. MEESON’S WILL),
historical (CLEOPATRA) and fantastic (STELLA FREGELIUS). During his career, he wrote over
40 books. Many of his titles referred to a female character or attribute – MONTEZUMA’S
DAUGHTER (1894), PEARL MAIDEN (1903), QUEEN SHEBA’S RING (1910), and THE VIRGIN OF THE SUN
(1922). Although the Victorian age was the first Golden Age of the ghost story, Haggard’s
sole attempt in this genre was ‘Only a Dream’, published in SMITH AND THE PHARAOHS (1920),
a collection of short stories. With the editor and historian Andrew Lang he wrote a sequel
to Homer’s Odyssey, THE WORLD’S DESIRE (1890). ERIC BRIGHTEYES (1891) was Haggard’s
excursion into the Norse saga.

“And now that time which she foresaw has come, and Heaven knows that I have
thought of her, poor dear. Ah! those footsteps of one dead that will echo through our
lives, those woman’s footprints on the marble flooring which will not be stamped out. Most
of us have heard and seen them at some time or other, and I hear and see them very plainly
tonight. Poor dead wife, I wonder if there are any doors in the land where you have gone
through which you can creep out to look at me tonight? I hope
that there are none. Death must indeed be a hell if the dead can see and feel and
take measure of the forgetful faithlessness of their beloved.”
(from ‘Only a
Dream’)

In 1895 Haggard stood unsuccessfully for parliament for East
Norfolk. Between the years 1912 and 1917 he travelled extensively as a member of the
Dominions Royal Commission. Haggard was an expert on agricultural and social conditions in
England and on colonial migration. His books on farming, such as THE FARMER’S YEAR BOOK
and RURAL ENGLAND, were based on long journeys through the country and thoughtful
research. For his non-fiction, such as THE POOR AND THE LAND (1905), and for his
government services, Haggard was knighted in 1912.
In 1919 he was created Knight
Commander of the British Empire. Haggard died in London, on May 14, 1925. He left behind
four completed novels. Three of Haggard’s siblings – Andrew, Edward, and Eleanora – also
published fiction, Eleanora under her married title as Baroness Albert D’Anethan.

Like his friend Rudyard Kipling, who
celebrated the heroism of British colonial soldiers, Haggard believed in the British
Empire.
His works are full of action in colorful locations. There his protagonists
find exotic, hidden societies, and encounter many dangers and characters with strange
powers. In this his works anticipated Edgar Rice Burroughs‘s
Tarzan books, or the John Carter stories set in Mars, in which the lost world idea was
applied to science fiction. Haggard’s own mythological world can also be seen as a
precursor of H.P. Lovecraft‘s ‘Cthulhu Mythos’ stories.

Although Haggard’s novels first were written for adults, several of them belong now to
the juvenile literature. Some of Haggard’s opinions, especially his
belief of a Jewish world wide conspiracy, have shadowed his later reputation and otherwise
open-minded approach to foreign cultures.
Moreover, the Haggard bloodline included
Jewish and Indian relations. Haggard’s diaries, published in 1980, reveal his curiosity to
a wide variety of subjects. His fascination with the Zulu culture, based on knowledge of
history and traditions, can be seen in his portraits of Umbopa, the rightful king of the
land of Kukuanas in King Solomon’s Mines, and the heroic Umslopogaas in Allan
Quatermain
, as well in the Zulu trilogy MARIE (1912), CHILD OF STORM (1913), and
FINISHED (1917). Also in Montezuma’s Daughter, set in Mexico at the time of the
Spanish conquest, Haggard showed sympathy for a threatened culture. Secrets of Haggard’s
private life – although married to another, he lived for years close to the woman he had
always loved – have revealed that behind the mask of a respected Victorian gentleman was a
more complex personality than generally has been known.

For further reading: The Cloak that I Left by L.R. Haggard (1951); Rider Haggard: His
Life and Works
by M.N. Cohen (1960); Rider Haggard as Rural Reformer by P.B.
Ellis (1976) Rider Haggard by P.B. Ellis (1978); Rider Haggard by D.S.
Higgins (1983); Anima as Fate by C. Brunner (1986); Rider
Haggard and the Fiction of Empire
by W. Katz (1987)
; Children of the EmpireThe Victorian Haggards by Victoria Manthorpe (1996); Rudyard Kipling and Sir Henry Rider Haggard on Screen, Stage, Radio and
Television
by Philip Leibfried (1999); Imagining Africa: Landscape in H.
Rider Haggard’s African Romances
by Lindy Stiebel (2001)

Selected works:

  • CETAWAYO AND HIS WHITE NEIGHBOURS, 1882
  • THE WITCH’S HEAD , 1884
  • DAWN, 1884
  • KING SOLOMON’S MINES, 1885 – Kuningas Salomonin kaivokset film 1937, dir. by Robert Stevenson; remake 1950, dir. by
    Compton Bennett and 1985, dir. by J. Lee Thompson
  • SHE, 1887 – Kuolematon kuningatar film 1935, dir, by Lancing C. Holden, Irving Pichel; film 1965, dir. by Robert
    Day; film The Vengeance of She, dir. by Cliff Owen
  • JESS, 1887
  • ALLAN QUATERMAIN, 1887 – Salattu maa
  • A TALE OF THREE LIONS, 1887
  • MR. MEESON’S WILL, 1888
  • MAIWA’S REVENGE, 1888
  • MY FELLOW LABOURER AND THE WRECK OF THE COPELAND, 1888
  • COLONEL QUARITCH, V.C., 1888
  • CLEOPATRA, 1889 (first of series)
  • ALLAN’S WIFE, 1889
  • BEATRICE, 1890
  • THE WORLD’S DESIRE, 1890 (with Andrew Lang)
  • ERIC BRIGHTWEYES, 1891
  • NADA THE LILY, 1892
  • MONTEZUMA’S DAUGHTER, 1893
  • THE PEOPLE OF THE MIST, 1894
  • JOAN HASTE, 1895
  • HEART OF THE WORLD, 1895
  • CHURCH AND STATE, 1895
  • THE WIZARD, 1896
  • DR. THERNE, 1898
  • SWALLOW, 1898
  • A FARMER’S YEAR, 1899
  • THE LAST BOER WAR, 1899
  • THE SPRING OF LION, 1899
  • MONTEZUMA’S DAUGHTER, 1899
  • BLACK HEART AND WHITE HEART, 1900
  • THE NEW SOUTH AFRICA, 1900
  • A WINTER PILGRIMAGE, 1901
  • LYSBETH, 1901
  • RURAL ENGLAND, 2 vol., 1902
  • PEARL-MAIDEN, 1903
  • STELLA FREGELIUS, 1904
  • THE BRETHREN, 1904
  • AYESHA: THE RETURN OF SHE, 1905
  • A GARDENER’S YEAR, 1905
  • REPORT OF SALVATION ARMY COLONIES, 1905
  • THE WAY OF THE SPIRIT, 1906
  • BENITA, 1906
  • FAIR MARGARET, 1907
  • THE GHOST KINGS, 1908
  • THE YELLOW GOD, 1908
  • THE LADY OF BLOSSHOLME, 1909
  • QUEEN SHEBAS RING, 1910
  • REGENERATION: AN ACCOUNT OF THE SOCIAL WORK OF THE SALVATION ARMY, 1910
  • MORNING STAR, 1910
  • RED EVE, 1911
  • THE MAHATMA AND THE HARE, 1911
  • RURAL DENMARK, 1911
  • MARIE, 1912
  • CHILD OF STORM, 1913
  • THE WANDERER’S NECLACE, 1914
  • A CALL TO ARMS, 1914
  • THE HOLY FLOWER, 1915 – Pyhä kukka
  • AFTER THE WAR SETTLEMENT AND EMPLOYMENT OF EX-SERVICE MEN, 1916
  • THE IVORY CHILD, 1916
  • FINISHED, 1917
  • LOVE ETERNAL, 1918
  • MOON OF ISRAEL, 1918
  • WHEN THE WORLD SHOOK, 1919
  • THE ANCIENT ALLAN, 1920
  • SMITH AND THE PHARAOHS, 1920
  • SHE AND ALLAN, 1921
  • THE VIRGIN OF THE SUN, 1922
  • WISDOM’S DAUGHTER, 1923
  • HEU-HEU, 1924
  • QUEEN OF THE DAWN, 1925
  • THE DAYS OF MY LIFE: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY BY SIR H. RIDER HAGGARD, 1926
  • TREASURE OF THE LAKE, 1926
  • ALLAN AND THE ICE GODS, 1927
  • MARY OF MARION ISLE, 1929
  • BELSHAZZAR, 1930
  • THE PRIVATE DIARIES OF SIR H. RIDER HAGGARD, 1980
  • THE BEST SHORT

http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/haggard.htm

H.G.WELLS VERSION OF HISTORY DISCUSSED IN “THE MALTESE FALCON”

November 21, 2006 at 5:32 am | Posted in Books, Globalization, History, Literary, Philosophy | Leave a comment

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On H. G. Wells in “The Maltese Falcon”

Mr. Wells’s history in “The Maltese Falcon”

“These are facts, historical facts, not schoolbook history, not Mr. Wells’s history, but history nevertheless.”

–Dashiell Hammett (124)

Commentary:

“Mr. Wells’s history” serves as a casual point of reference in Caspar
Gutman’s account of the appearance and subsequent disappearance of the Maltese falcon from recorded history. As he explains to Sam Spade, the Knights of Rhodes ordered the making of a tribute to Emperor Charles V that reflected and celebrated their unabashed looting of the East: a “glorious golden falcon” assembled by Turkish slaves,”encrusted from head to foot with the finest jewels in their coffers … the finest out of Asia” (124). But it never reached the emperor because it was stolen–and had been stolen repeatedly ever since.

As the most academically invested twentieth-century seeker of the falcon, Gutman’s complacent avarice makes him the modern historical authority of the moment, since historical facts are as steeped in contented criminality as he is. As both thief and historian, he brushes received, “schoolbook” history against the grain to expose forgotten thefts. Sam Spade’s placid, noncommittal response to the relish with which Gutman narrates the falcon’s bloody travels suggests a present gone blandly indifferent to the exotic, high-stakes backdrop of crusades, conquest, slavery, greed, and international piracy.

In this context, Mr. Wells’s history–that is, The Outline of History–appears naively distanced from historical facts, a vague “outline”
removed from the insistent materiality of the falcon’s travels through time. (1) If Sam Spade’s outward refusal to be moved by past violence stems from his hard-boiled sense that modernity is characterized by everyday bloodshed, Wells’s
Outline stands for a kind of soft-boiled modernity.
Simply unaware of either past, exotic brutalities or present, routine ones–lacking both Gutman’s and Sam Spade’s insights–
The Outline,
like many of Wells’s interwar works, adheres to a belief in universal humanity’s enlightened progress toward a secular world government, a condition that would render obsolete the crusading past that interests Gutman. And yet “history nevertheless” possesses a complicated allure for Sam Spade as well as Gutman. A kind of cultural knowingness attaches to the historical facts that Gutman conveys to Spade, a
sense that “we men of the world know” how greed and bloodshed really propel history, not the sanitized, bloodless innocence of Edwardian popular historians.
The desire that both men share to hold the falcon implies a desire to hold the material of history in one’s hands, to touch the barbarically authentic in what Walter Benjamin might recognize as this “tainted … cultural treasure” (256).

Of course, Hammett will counter Gutman’s narrative with the subsequent discovery that the falcon is a fake. Gutman’s “rara avis” (204) is both a copy and a rarity: not the real thing, but evidence of a rarely expressed desire for the kind of brutal crusading efficiency that the novel’s hardboiled present can only weakly imitate. For all
the weight of this falcon, holding it implies holding nothing at all–“the stuff that dreams are made of,” in John Huston’s fortunate, if un-Hammett-like, addition to his film. In Gutman’s depiction, the authentic falcon’s origins are implicated in highly effective barbarism: the systematic looting of the East coupled with efficient exploitation of “the anonymous toil” (Benjamin 256) of enslaved workers. In contrast, the clumsier efforts to obtain the falcon by both Spade and Gutman’s gang come to be implicated in a wistful “dream” to reproduce the success of such extortion. In
The Maltese Falcon, gangster ineptitude and haphazard, wasteful violence are only feeble contemporary echoes of an older, more exacting order of barbarity, as when Sam Spade
awkwardly steps on the hand of the dead man who has just “toiled” to deliver the fake falcon to him, while his own “widespread fingers” exhibit “ownership in their curving” over it (159). Efficiency and bloodshed forge crusade-era “historical facts,” while the hard-boiled detective story form itself, in its well-advertised graphic violence, chronicles bloodshed that goes nowhere and yields nothing. And yet this contrast also articulates a nostalgia for crusades that went
somewhere and took something–that did much more than clumsily step on the fingers of someone who is already dead.

Hammett’s presentation of Gutman and Wells as competing
historians
thus privileges the modernist pulp novel’s masculine closeness to the sordid, senseless immediacy of urban violence; chronicling this hard-boiled present takes precedence over both Gutman’s efficiently bloody past and Wells’s efficiently bloodless
future.

See: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0403/is_3_50/ai_n12413258

The Maltese Falcon Script: H.G. Wells’s history mentioned

Now, let’s talk about the black bird.

What do you know of the Order of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem…

…later known as the Knights of Rhodes?

– Crusaders or something, weren’t they? – Very good. Sit down.

In      these crusading Knights…

…persuaded Emperor Charles V to give them the Island of Malta.

He made but one condition:

That they pay him yearly the tribute of a falcon…

…in acknowledgement that Malta was still under Spain.

Do you follow me?

Have you any conception of the extreme…

…the immeasurable wealth of the Order of that time?

They were pretty well fixed.

“Pretty well” is putting it mildly. They were rolling in wealth, sir.

For years they’d taken from the East nobody knows what spoils of gems…

…precious metals, silks, ivory, sir.

We all know the Holy Wars to them were largely a matter of loot.

The Knights were profoundly grateful to the Emperor Charles…

…for his generosity toward them.

They hit upon the thought of sending…

…for his first year’s tribute, not an insignificant live bird…

…but a glorious golden falcon…

…crusted from head to foot…

…with the finest jewels in their coffers.

Well, sir…

…what do you think of that? – I don’t know.

"These are facts, historical facts....

not schoolbook history, not Mr. Wells' history,

but history,nevertheless."

On  H. G. Wells in "The Maltese Falcon"


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