PALESTINIAN PUBLIC OPINION POLL

November 19, 2006 at 4:19 pm | Posted in Arabs, Globalization, History, Islam, Israel, Middle East, Zionism | Leave a comment

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<b>An-Najah National University</b>

An-Najah National University

Center for Opinion Polls and Survey Studies

Results of Palestinian Public
Opinion Poll

No. 24

16-18 November 2006

Tel: (972) (9) 2345113 Fax: (972)(9) 2345982

Nablus – Palestinian: P.O.Box 7, 707

Email: Polls@najah.edu  hussein596@yahoo.com

Background

When the exchange of verbal accusations prevailed and when the two
major Palestinian factions started to resort to arms pushing the conflict to the verge of
internal fighting accompanied by a state of paralysis in the public sector due to the
strike, Palestinians finally found no way out of the political and financial impasse other
than a unity government that would include all parliamentary factions in addition to some
independent figures. President Abbas and Prime Minister Hanyia promised Palestinians to
form a unity government before the end of November, and the media point out that a
national unity government has become very imminent, especially that rumors leaked out by
some officials that an agreement on the general framework of the government has already
been accomplished.

On the other side of the scene, the Israeli army committed another
massacre in Beit Hanon in the Strip that resulted in the massive killing of more than 20
civilians. The political outcome of the massacre was a veto by the US in the Security
Council that aborted the Arab countries’ attempt to pass a resolution that condemns
Israel.

On the Palestinian side public schools teachers suspended their strike
after an agreement was concluded with the Minister of Education and Higher Education on a
specific procedure to pay their salaries. As a result of this agreement students went back
to their schools.

The Results

Following are the results of the 24th Palestinian Public
Opinion Poll conducted by the Center for Opinion Polls and Survey Studies at An-Najah
National University during the period from November 16 to 18, 2006. The University
sponsors all polls conducted by its Center.

This poll undertakes Palestinian public opinions as relate to the new
political realities, particularly the unity government, the priorities of Palestinian
people, the expectations of Palestinian people from the new government, Palestinian
opinions in forms of resistance, in addition to an assessment of the performance of
Palestinian institutions.

______________________________________________________________________

The opinions represented in the results reflect those of the study;
they do not represent by any means the opinion of An-Najah National University.

The sample included 1360 persons whose age group is 18 and above
and who have the right to vote. The enclosed questionnaire was distributed on 860 persons
from the West Bank and 500 persons from the Gaza Strip. The sample was drawn randomly and
the margin of error is about ±3%; still 3.8% of the members of the sample refused to
answer the questionnaire.

The General Results:

    • 41.8% of respondents were pessimistic towards the general Palestinian conditions at this
      stage.
    • 86.8% of respondents did not feel safe neither for themselves nor for their families and
      properties under the present circumstances.
    • 69.5% of respondents said that their economic situation under the current circumstances
      is deteriorating.
    • 74.8% of respondents said that the local security conditions deteriorated.
    • 42.8% of respondents said that their priority at the present stage is putting an end to
      the security mayhem.
    • 54.3% of respondents said that a unity government is the most ideal form of government
      for running the country’s affairs.
    • 65.5% of respondents said that the agreement reached on a unity government will free
      Palestinian people from the political and financial sanctions; 23.5%said the opposite.
    • 56.2% of respondents said that Hamas movement is really in favor with a
      successful unity government: 33.4% said the opposite.
    • 59.3% of respondents said that Fateh movement is really in favor of a successful
      unity government: 30.5% said the opposite.
    • 30.7% of respondents said that the major reason behind the delay in forming a unity
      government was outside interference and 22.9% said that it was disagreement over the
      political program of the government.
    • 29.6% of respondents support the idea that the future unity government should only be a
      services government.
    • 48.8% of respondents supported the idea that negotiation should only be the
      responsibility of the PLO.
    • 82.9% of respondents supported the reformation of the PLO so that it would include all
      Palestinian factions, including those which are not part of it.
    • As for the priorities of the future Palestinian government respondents saw the
      following:
    • 84.4% were in favor of imposing order on the local security conditions
    • 83.5% were in favor of creating job opportunities.
    • 82.8% were in favor of improving the economic conditions and encouraging investments.
    • 82.7% were in favor of improving public health services.
    • 82.6% were in favor of improving public education.
    • 78.7% were in favor of carrying out court verdicts.
    • 77.6% were in favor of improving the work of local councils.
    • 80.1% were in favor of reforming the security apparatuses.
    • 59.9% of respondents supported armed operations inside Israel; 34.9% rejected them.
    • 65.7% of respondents supported concentrating armed operations within the borders of the
      1967 occupied territories
    • 42.4% of respondents rejected firing rockets at Israeli targets from the Gaza Strip.
    • 43.2% of respondents said that firing rockets against Israeli targets from the Gaza
      Strip hurts the Palestinian cause; 34.7% said it serves the Palestinian cause positively.
    • 34.9% of respondents said the form of struggle that best serves the Palestinian cause is
      the armed struggle.
    • 69.6% of respondents said that kidnapping foreign journalists and sympathizers with
      Palestinians hurts the Palestinian cause.
    • 85.4% of respondents said that there is some outside intervention in the Palestinian
      decision; 8.7% said that it is an Arab intervention, 18.4% said that it is a foreign one,
      72.5% said that it is both foreign and Arab, and 75% said that this intervention is a
      negative one.
    • Within the present circumstances 31.4% of respondents said that they think of
      emigrating.
    • 31.2% of respondents said that that they may emigrate if proper living conditions become
      available to them abroad.
    • 43.7% of respondents said that the main cause that compels them to think of emigrating
      is lack of security; 23.8% said that it is the poor economic situation.
    • 66.9% of respondents supported completing local councils elections in the areas where
      they were not conducted yet.
    • 45.5% of respondents supported the coming of Bader forces from Jordan to the Palestinian
      territories; 31.7% of respondents said that Bader forces are capable of imposing order in
      the Palestinian territories
    • Respondents assessed the performance of the following institutions as "good"
      with the following percentages:

– 53.2% Palestinian Presidency

– 43.5% Palestinian Government

– 40.4% Palestinian Legislative Council (PLC)

– 34.3% judicial system

– 31.8% security apparatuses

– 70.4% Palestinian universities

    • As for political affiliation respondents gave the following results:

People’s Party

1.3%

Democratic Front

1.2%

Islamic Jihad

3.9%

Fateh

34.9%

Hamas

18.4%

Fida

0.8%

Popular Front

4.9%

Palestinian National Initiative

0.8%

I am an independent nationalist

7.2%

I am an independent Islamist

4.2%

None of the above

20.8%

Others

1.6%

The General Results of the Poll

Are you optimistic or pessimistic towards the general Palestinian
situation at this stage?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Optimistic

41.8

37.6

49.2

Pessimistic

56.0

61.0

47.4

No opinion/I do not know

2.1

1.4

3.4

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Under the current situation, do you feel that you, your family and your
properties are secure?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

12.6

11.5

14.6

To some extent I do

30.0

27.9

33.6

No

56.8

60.2

51.0

No opinion/I do not know

0.5

0.3

0.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Under the current circumstances in which direction has your economic
situation developed?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Towards the best

4.4

2.8

7.2

Towards the worst

69.5

72.0

65.2

It stayed the same

26.1

25.2

27.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

In your opinion, how did security conditions develop within the last
months?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Towards the best

6.0

3.0

11.2

Towards the worst

74.8

76.4

72.0

It stayed the same

18.1

19.3

16.0

No opinion/I do not know

1.1

1.3

0.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is your top priority at this stage?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Improving the economic situation

33.4

31.7

36.2

Putting an end to the security mayhem

42.8

41.7

44.6

Creating job opportunities

15.1

17.1

11.8

Improving public health services

7.1

8.1

5.4

Other

1.0

0.8

1.2

No opinion/I do not know

0.6

0.5

0.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What form of government do you see fit to run the Palestinian
Authority’s affairs?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

A unity government

54.3

58.5

47.2

An independent national technocrat
government

23.2

18.8

30.6

A government from Hamas

7.0

7.1

6.8

A government from Fateh

10.5

9.0

13.2

No opinion/I do not know

5.0

6.6

2.2

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In your opinion, would an agreement to form a unity government free
Palestinian people from the political and financial sanctions imposed on them?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

65.5

65.1

66.2

No

23.5

24.7

21.6

No opinion/I do not know

11.0

10.2

12.2

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you think that Hamas is really in favor of a successful unity
government?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

56.2

60.0

49.6

No

33.4

28.6

41.6

No opinion/I do not know

10.4

11.4

8.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you think that Fateh is really in favor of a successful unity
government?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

59.3

55.2

66.2

No

30.5

32.6

27.0

No opinion/I do not know

10.2

12.2

6.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In your opinion what is the reason behind the delay in the formation of
a unity government?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

The disagreement over the political program
of the government

22.9

21.2

25.8

The disagreement over the distribution of
portfolios

20.2

14.7

29.8

Outside interference

30.7

35.3

22.8

Hamas and Fateh’s reluctance
to have political partnership.

20.7

21.6

19.2

Other

0.8

0.9

0.6

No opinion/I do not know

4.6

6.3

1.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you support or reject that the role of the future government be
limited to providing services to people without having anything to do with the political
affairs?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

I support

29.6

29.3

30.0

I reject

63.8

65.1

61.6

No opinion/I do not know

6.6

5.6

8.4

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do support or reject giving the responsibilities of negotiations with
Israel to the PLO only?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

I support

48.8

44.9

55.6

I reject

42.9

47.9

34.4

No opinion/I do not know

8.2

7.2

10.0

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you support or reject reforming the PLO so that it would include all
Palestinian factions including those which are not already included?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

I support

82.9

84.7

80.0

I reject

12.1

10.2

15.2

No opinion/I do not know

5.0

5.1

4.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In your opinion what are the priorities of the future government?

(Give your preferences on a 0-10 scale)

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Imposing order on local security conditions

8.4404

8.5465

8.2580

Creating job opportunities

8.3515

8.5360

8.0340

Improving the economic conditions and
encouraging investments

8.2801

8.3849

8.1000

Upgrading public health services

8.2699

8.8209

7.8380

Upgrading public education services

8.2618

8.5349

7.7920

Carrying out court verdicts

7.8743

8.0872

7.5080

Improving the performance of local councils
(municipalities)

7.7551

7.9105

7.4880

Restructuring security apparatuses

8.0088

8.2314

7.6260

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you support or reject armed operations inside Israel?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

I strongly support

23.4

19.0

31.0

I support

36.5

37.4

35.0

I reject

28.1

30.8

23.4

I strongly reject

6.8

7.1

6.4

No opinion/I do not know

5.1

5.7

4.2

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you support or reject concentrating Palestinian resistance within
the 1967 borders alongside with political negotiations?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

I strongly support

21.7

14.3

34.4

I support

44.0

50.2

33.2

I reject

23.8

25.7

20.4

I strongly reject

5.7

3.6

9.4

No opinion/I do not know

4.9

6.2

2.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Do support or reject firing rockets by Palestinian factions from the
Strip against Israel?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

I strongly support

17.1

14.1

22.4

I support

35.5

39.1

29.4

I reject

30.8

32.8

27.4

I strongly reject

11.6

8.5

17.0

No opinion/I do not know

4.9

6.5

3.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Do think that firing rockets from the Gaza Strip against Israel hurts
or helps Palestinian national struggle?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

It helps

34.7

30.8

41.4

It hurts

43.2

46.7

37.2

It is useless

13.2

18.5

17.6

No opinion/I do not know

3.9

4.0

3.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

In your opinion and under the current local and international
circumstances what form of struggle would best serve the Palestinian cause?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Peaceful struggle (demonstrations; sit
ins–)

14.6

14.1

15.6

Armed struggle

34.9

34.0

36.6

Diplomatic struggle (international stands
and forums)

15.0

13.8

17.0

Resorting to negotiations as in the past

27.4

30.9

21.2

Other

4.8

3.5

7.0

No opinion/I do not know

3.3

3.7

2.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Do think that kidnapping and detaining sympathizers and journalists by
some would help Palestinian struggle?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

It serves

7.8

4.2

14.0

It hurts

69.6

76.4

58.0

It is useless

20.7

17.4

26.2

No opinion/I do not know

1.9

2.0

1.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Do you think that there is an outside interference in the Palestinian
political decision?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

85.4

78.4

81.8

No

10.0

9.1

11.6

No opinion/I do not know

4.6

3.5

6.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

If your response to the above question is "yes", do you think
that the interference is ——–?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Arabic

8.7

4.8

15.9

Foreign

18.4

21.3

13.2

Both Arabic and foreign

72.5

73.5

70.7

No opinion/I do not know

0.3

0.4

0.2

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Generally, how do you assess the interference in the Palestinian
political decision?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Positive

9.5

8.0

12.2

Negative

75.0

77.4

70.7

Without effect

11.7

12.1

11.0

No opinion/I do not know

3.8

2.5

6.1

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Under your current circumstances, do you think of emigrating to another
country?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

31.4

25.8

41.0

No

67.6

73.5

57.4

No opinion/I do not know

1.0

0.7

1.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

If proper conditions are made available to you to live outside
Palestine, will you think of emigrating?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

31.2

28.1

36.4

No

68.1

71.0

63.0

No opinion/I do not know

0.7

0.8

0.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

What is the main cause that would make you think of emigrating?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Lack of security

23.8

21.9

26.3

The poor economic situation

43.7

47.1

39.1

Fear of a civil war

7.4

5.0

10.6

The absence of a possible political
breakthrough that would give some hope

20.9

22.7

18.4

No opinion/I do not know

3.4

3.3

5.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Do you support or reject the completion of the local councils’
elections at the present time?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

I support

66.9

72.0

58.2

I reject

26.3

22.9

32.0

No opinion/I do not know

6.8

5.1

9.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Lately, there has been a talk about the possibility of the coming of Bader
Corps from Jordan to the Palestinian Territories for the purpose of putting an end to the
present security disorder. Are in favor of the coming of these troops?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

45.5

40.9

53.4

No

43.5

49.7

32.8

No opinion/I do not know

11.0

9.4

13.8

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

Do you think that Bader Corps will be able to control the
security situations in the Palestinian Territories?

 

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

Yes

31.7

29.7

35.2

No

49.1

52.4

43.4

No opinion/I do not know

19.2

17.9

21.4

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

 

In general how do you assess the performance of the following
Palestinian institutions?

 

Total

 

Good

bad

No
opinion/

I do not know

The Palestinian
Presidency

53.2

40.2

6.6

The Palestinian
Government

43.5

49.6

6.9

The PLC

40.4

48.9

10.7

The Judicial System

34.3

53.4

12.4

The Security Apparatuses

41.8

62.1

6.2

Palestinian Universities

70.4

22.1

7.4

 

West Bank

 

Good

Bad

No
opinion/

I do not know

The Palestinian
Presidency

44.8

46.0

9.2

The Palestinian
Government

43.6

46.9

9.5

The PLC

37.8

48.1

14.1

The Judicial System

29.3

58.6

12.1

The Security Apparatuses

27.2

65.5

7.3

Palestinian Universities

72.8

19.1

8.1

 

Gaza Strip

 

Good

Bad

No
opinion/

I do not know

The
Palestinian Presidency

67.6

30.2

2.2

The
Palestinian Government

43.2

54.4

2.4

The PLC

44.8

50.2

5.0

The Judicial
System

42.8

44.4

12.8

The Security
Apparatuses

39.6

56.2

4.2

Palestinian
Universities

66.4

27.4

6.2

 

Which of the following political affiliations do you
support?

PARTY

Total

West
Bank

Gaza
Strip

People’s Party

1.3

1.0

1.8

Democratic Front

1.2

1.0

1.4

Islamic Jihad

3.9

2.7

6.0

Fateh

34.9

30.5

42.6

Hamas

18.4

19.0

17.4

Fida

0.8

0.1

2.0

Popular Front

4.9

3.4

7.4

Palestinian National Initiative

0.8

0.8

0.8

I am an independent nationalist

7.2

7.0

7.6

I am an independent Islamist

4.2

4.5

3.6

None of the above

20.8

28.4

7.8

Others

1.6

1.6

1.6

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

Hello;
Enclosed please find the major results of the 24th 
Public Opinion Poll conducted between November 16-18
by the Center of Opinion Polls and Survey Studies at
An-Najah National University.
This poll undertakes Palestinian public opinions as
relate to the new political realities, particularly
the unity government, the priorities of Palestinian
people,  the expectations of Palestinian people from
the new government, Palestinian opinions in forms of
resistance, in addition to an assessment of the
performance of Palestinian institutions.
We hope that you will be able to benefit from these
results and let us know of your observations, comments
and advice.
Your response will be very much appreciated.
Thanks

Dr. Hussein Ahmad
Director, Opinion Polls and Survey Study Center
An-Najah National University

Poll No. 24

Hussein Ahmad hussein596@yahoo.com

Sunday, November 19, 2006

AIR FORCE NEWS

November 19, 2006 at 6:27 am | Posted in Military, Research, Science & Technology, USA | Leave a comment

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U

U.S. Air Force Print News

usafnews@afnews.af.mil

http://www.af.mil

Friday, November 17, 2006

Air Force Print News for Nov. 17, 2006

Today’s stories include:

Heritage to Horizons celebration highlights CV-22 Osprey

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032276

Guard, Reserve troop rotations haven’t changed, official says

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032277

On-orbit checkout of SBIRS payload confirmed

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032285

NCOs have a shot at school through AFIT

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032253

Active flightline (Stand-alone photos)

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032290

Unmanned vehicle provides reusable test capabilities in space

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032226

America Supports You: Send packages to troops, families

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032224

Communications construction crew makes mission happen

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032169

NORAD to track Santa’s trek around world

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032204

Air Force, industry must partner to create synth-fuel demand

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032225

Readiness troops train for the future

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032209

CENTAF releases airpower summary for Nov. 17

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032228

New aggressor units expand training capabilities

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032069

PACAF commander advises discretion in cyberspace

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032167
3

graduate from new C-5 schoolhouse at Lackland

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123031961

Portland reservists remember King 56 crew

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123031952

Commentary – What makes a wingman?

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123032201

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instructions. America’s Air Force… Integrity, Service, Excellence Heritage to Horizons
celebration highlights CV-22 Osprey by Lt. Col. Stephanie Holcombe Air
Force Special Operations Command Public Affairs HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. (AFPN)
— The
first operational CV-22 Osprey stole the show during an air power demonstration at
Hurlburt Field, Fla., Nov. 16, commemorating the Air Force’s 60th anniversary. As special
operations forces simulated a behind-the-lines mission with Air Force Special Operations
Command AC-130 gunships firing overhead and MH-53 Pave Low helicopters bringing in ground
forces, the Osprey swooped in, banked and transformed from airplane to helicopter before a
crowd of hundreds who had gathered to witness its arrival. Once on the ground, Lt. Gen.
Mike Wooley, AFSOC commander and pilot of the aircraft, turned over the "keys"
to Lt. Col. Ed Corallo, commander of the 8th Special Operations Squadron, the first
operational CV-22 squadron. "That is the way to start a day, let me tell you. The
CV-22 is an absolute dream to fly," he said, grinning. "You get a sense of the
transformational capability that this airplane will bring to our SOF warriors in every
branch of the service. It is a magnificent airplane." "We’re excited about the
CV-22 at SOCOM," said Gen. Doug Brown, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command.
"The infill of 19 October 01, as we put special operations forces on the ground in
Afghanistan, we would have done it quicker, we would have done it safer, we would have
done it with less refuelings and we would have been able to put more teams on the ground
in the same period of darkness if we had the CV-22." AFSOC is scheduled to receive at
50 CV-22s between now and fiscal year 2017. The arrival of the CV-22 was the first of the
day’s events commemorating the Air Force 60th anniversary, themed "Heritage to
Horizons." While the Osprey arrival showed what is on the horizon for special
operations Airmen, a ceremony later that day highlighted the command’s heritage. There,
Air Commandos past and present watched as Hurlburt’s 16th Special Operations Wing regained
its historic 1st SOW designation. "It’s a great day for the United States Air Force,
United States Special Operations Command and AFSOC as we bring back the great heritage of
the 1st Special Operations Wing," General Brown said at the reflagging ceremony.
Guard, Reserve troop rotations haven’t changed, official says by Army Sgt. Sara Wood Air
Reserve Personnel Center Public Affairs WASHINGTON (AFPN) — The National Guard and
Reserve are still operating under the same rules for mobilization length, and no troops
have been mobilized for longer than the allowed 24 cumulative months, the top Defense
Department official for Reserve affairs said here today. The current law actually allows
President Bush to mobilize up to a million guardsmen and reservists for 24 consecutive
months, but Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld made the decision to make the rule 24
cumulative months, to relieve stress on the force, Thomas F. Hall, assistant secretary of
defense for reserve affairs, said in an interview. Mr. Hall explained the
24-consecutive-months rule, in the strictest sense, could actually see a guardsman
mobilized up until one day short of the two-year mark, and then remobilized after a
one-day break. Using the cumulative rule allows the reservist or guardsman to maintain
balance among military service, family and employer, Mr. Hall said. "We need to
maintain that balance so that our employers will continue to support us, (and) our
families will continue to support us," he said. "As you would well understand,
if you don’t get that support as a guardsman or reservist, it’s very hard for you to
serve." Currently no guardsmen or reservists have been mobilized longer than 24
cumulative months, Mr. Hall said, and DOD thinks this is a sustainable arrangement. Many
troops have served months short of two years, and are still available to go back, he said.
However, officials are always examining force requirements, and could switch to the
consecutive rule, he said. "We’re not there yet, where we have used up our
assets," he said. "But should that happen, and Congress wishes to change the law
or give us additional authority, they can certainly do that. I have full confidence that
Congress, working with us, will give us the authorities we need as well as the funds and
as well as the equipment they always have." Some guardsmen and reservists have been
mobilized a second, third or even fourth time, Mr. Hall said, but almost all of them have
been volunteers. Many of the troops believe in the cause they’re fighting for and are
asking to go back. "They are very loyal; these young men and women want to support
their buddies and shipmates in a particular unit, and they volunteer to go back with that
unit, even if they’ve gone before," he said. "They are fast becoming the next
greatest generation." DOD’s goal is to get the National Guard and Reserve on a
schedule where units deploy for one year, and have five years at home, Mr. Hall said. For
active duty, the goal is a one-year deployment with two years at home. DOD is working
toward that goal, but still has progress to make, he said. "The war on terror is not
going to go away, so we have to have a long-term view; we have to look over the next 20
years," Mr. Hall said. "We have not changed our requirements; we’ve not changed
our metrics. We are in a transition period. We’re working toward those goals. In the
intervening time, we might have to send someone quicker than we want." The most
recent mobilization announcements are the 218th Brigade Combat Team from the South
Carolina Army National Guard, which will deploy to Afghanistan in support of Operation
Enduring Freedom, and about 6,000 reservists who will deploy in units smaller than
brigades to support Operation Iraqi Freedom, Mr. Hall said. On-orbit checkout of SBIRS
payload confirmed PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFPN) — The Air Force successfully
completed initial early on-orbit checkout of the first Space Based Infrared System
payload. SBIRS will deliver a new generation of space-based satellites providing missile
warning, missile defense, technical intelligence and battlespace awareness to combatant
commanders. The SBIRS Wing at the Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air
Force Base, Calif., is developing and acquiring the system, and the 460th Space Wing,
headquartered at Buckley AFB, Colo., will operate SBIRS. "SBIRS presents a new era of
global surveillance with the ability to detect and report events that were previously
beyond our capabilities, providing greatly improved support to our combatant
commanders," said Gen. Kevin Chilton, commander of Air Force Space Command. The
initial ground phase of SBIRS, called Increment 1, became operational in 2001, using a new
consolidated ground architecture that processes data from current on-orbit Defense Support
Program satellites. The payload, operating in a highly elliptical orbit, or HEO, is the
first component of the Increment 2 constellation, ultimately including two HEO payloads
and multiple satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit. The SBIRS team, composed of
personnel from the Air Force as well as Lockheed Martin, the prime contractor, and
Northrop Grumman, the payload developer, confirmed the deployment, checkout and testing of
the HEO payload, focusing on calibration of the infrared sensors as well as line-of-sight
testing. Performance is meeting or exceeding all specified mission requirements. The
payload will be fully operationally certified by summer of 2008. "Launch and checkout
of the first SBIRS HEO system is a critical step in demonstrating this important new
operational capability," said Lt. Gen. Michael Hamel, SMC commander. "SBIRS will
deliver revolutionary new ways to address some of the most serious threats the nation
faces." NCOs have a shot at school through AFIT RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE, Texas (AFPN)
— Air Force Institute of Technology officials are offering nine NCOs the opportunity to
pursue an advanced science, engineering or management degree at Wright-Patterson Air Force
Base, Ohio. Additionally, one NCO will be offered the opportunity to earn a master’s
degree in economic crime from an AFIT-sponsored civilian institution. Ten NCOs from around
the Air Force will be selected in early 2007 to attend the Enlisted-to-AFIT program. The
program is designed to provide commanders with a diverse and renewable source of highly
proficient and educated career NCOs, according to officials. Nominations are due to the
Air Force Personnel Center here by Jan. 20. People interested in applying for the 18-month
program must be at least a technical sergeant with a minimum of eight years time in
service, 24 months time on station and have three years retainability upon graduation.
They must have completed the appropriate skill-level upgrade and resident professional
military education schooling for their rank, officials said. Applicants must have a
bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university. Besides academic
transcripts, applicants have to provide test scores from either the Graduate Record
Examination or Graduate Management Admission Test, depending upon the specific AFIT
degree-program requirements. AFIT is the Air Force’s graduate school of engineering and
management and its institution for technical professional continuing education. Since
residence degrees were first granted in 1956, more than 15,000 graduate and 300 doctorate
of philosophy degrees have been awarded. Prospective students can review program
requirements and nomination procedures on the Enlisted to AFIT Web site at http://www.afit.edu.
Active flightline A C-17 Globemaster III sits on the runway moments before takeoff at
Incirlik at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, Nov. 16. More than half of all air cargo delivered
to support Operation Iraqi Freedom is processed through here. Due to the close proximity
of Incirlik to Iraq and the ability to land at more and smaller runways, flights from here
have kept at least 3,300 convoy trucks and 9,000 servicemembers from harm’s way. (U.S. Air
Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Larry A. Simmons) Unmanned vehicle provides reusable test
capabilities in space by Staff Sgt. C. Todd Lopez Air Force Print News WASHINGTON (AFPN)
— The Air Force is working on a space vehicle that will allow government scientists to
transport advanced technology into orbit, test its capability there, then bring it home to
see how it fared in the harsh environment of space. The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle is
similar to the space shuttle, except it’s about a fourth the size and unmanned. The OTV
can return from space on its own, said Lt. Col. Kevin Walker, an Air Force Rapid
Capabilities Office program manager. "All you do from the ground is send up the
command for it to de-orbit, then stand back and it de-orbits itself," he said.
"The OTV gets itself ready for re-entry, descends through the atmosphere, lines up on
the runway, puts down its landing gear … and it does it all on its own." The
vehicle will land at either Vandenberg or Edwards Air Force bases in California. The OTV
will serve as a test platform for satellites and other space technologies. The vehicle
allows satellite sensors, subsystems, components and associated technology to be
transported into the environment where they will be used — space. Scientists will prepare
components in the OTV’s experiment bay, and then the craft is launched into space aboard
an Atlas V launch vehicle. Once in space, the OTV begins testing its payload. Colonel
Walker said the doors aboard the craft could simply open, exposing the experiment bay, or
mission scientists could design more elaborate experiments. "You could design
something to extend itself out of the experiment bay, or have it on a retractable arm, or
it could just stay inside the bay," Colonel Walker said. "The OTV is a very
flexible space test platform for any number of various experiments." Being able to
test parts in their actual operational environment will allow scientists to better judge
how those parts will perform when deployed, so fewer redundancies may occur in future
satellites. "Rather than build unproven components into a high-cost satellite, with
multiple layers of redundancy to make sure they work — you can use the OTV to get those
components into space to see how they respond to the environment, and make sure they work
the way they were designed," Colonel Walker said. "When the OTV returns to
Earth, you can inspect the tested component and use that information to potentially alter
your design." The Air Force’s Rapid Capabilities Office has been tasked with
acquiring, testing and demonstrating the OTV. Colonel Walker said much of the X-37B system
vehicle is now being built and will soon move into a testing phase. "We are getting
into the subsystem and systems-wide testing, which will go on for about the next
year," he said. "We are projecting our first launch for the beginning of
2008." After a few flight tests in space, the OTV should be ready to begin
experimentation in orbit, Colonel Walker said. "The first flight or two will be to
check out the OTV itself to make sure it works the way it is designed to," he said.
"After that, you get into the realm of using it as a reusable space test platform —
putting space components into its experimental bay and taking them to space for
testing." Though the OTV is designed to provide a testing platform for new space
technologies, it is made up of several advanced, untested technologies itself. Randy
Walden, RCO deputy and technical director, said there are a number of cutting-edge
technologies on the OTV besides the auto de-orbit capability. It has new thermal
protection tiles underneath and high-temperature components and seals throughout that need
to be proven in orbit. "There will be a great deal of extremely useful data coming
from the OTV on its first flights,’ said Mr. Walden. "Our plan is to share this data
with other government agencies such as NASA." The X-37 program, originally a NASA
initiative, was transferred to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in 2004. The
Air Force’s X-37B program builds upon the early development and testing conducted by NASA,
DARPA and the Air Force Research Laboratory. "We are honored to be developing this
unique space platform," said David Hamilton, Jr., RCO director, "and very
excited about the potential benefits to future space programs." America Supports You:
Send packages to troops, families American Forces Press Service SANTA ANA, Calif. (AFPN)
— Just in time for the holidays, Operation Homefront has launched
"eCarePackage," an online service that allows citizens to send care packages to
deployed troops and their families. Operation Homefront is part of CinCHouse.com, a
community for military wives, and is a team member of America Supports You, a Department
of Defense program connecting U.S. citizens with members of the military. Servicemembers
and families can register on http://www.ecarepackage.org, which protects their identity and
location, and visitors can "adopt" them based on common interests. Then visitors
select individual items to create a customized care package for their chosen servicemember
or family and include a personal message. Operation Homefront’s team of volunteers takes
the order, boxes the selected items and ships them directly to the servicemember or family
— always protecting their identity and physical location. "There’s nothing like a
care package to cheer a deployed Soldier or a lonely military family, especially during
the holidays," said Amy Palmer, executive vice president of operations for Operation
Homefront. "With operational security for the troops so tight, we were concerned that
care packages weren’t getting through. So we built eCarePackage to ensure our troops and
families continue to ‘feel the love’ from Americans." Items available in the
eCarePackage store range from toiletries and necessities to games, books and candy. Most
items were donated from sponsors, particularly The Dollar Tree, which runs its Operation
Appreciation program in most stores nationwide. Donated items are not marked up, so
eCarePackage visitors often pay only the cost of handling and shipping — making
eCarePackage less expensive than doing it yourself. Moreover, Operation Homefront has
partnered with DHL, which provides postal service to overseas troops, to ensure direct and
timely delivery of all care packages to deployed servicemembers. The eCarePackage program
is an extension of Operation Homefront’s mission to provide emergency support and morale
to our troops, the families they leave behind during deployments, and wounded warriors
when they return home. Operation Homefront recently signed a memorandum of understanding
with the Defense Department to ensure greater collaboration. Communications construction
crew makes mission happen by Senior Airman Aldric Borders 379th Air Expeditionary Wing
SOUTHWEST ASIA (AFPN) — In the face of mortar attacks, gun fights, restricted movement
and a heavier than normal workload, Airmen pressed on to finish a mission paving the way
for enhanced communications for servicemembers throughout the AOR. These Airmen, assigned
to the A67, the engineering and installation arm of the A6, headquartered at the Combine
Air Operations Center, did their job under unusual conditions, said Lt. Col. Michael
Schultz, A67 division chief. "This project, which constructed one of a series of
towers needed for a larger project to build a communications network supporting
servicemembers throughout the AOR, challenged us with extraordinary obstacles right from
the beginning," said Colonel Schultz. "Our teams, who actually construct the
tower, don’t normally get so involved in the construction of the foundation for the
project; that is typically contracted to an outside company. This time around though, our
EI engineers played a much larger role." The engineering and installation team
engineered the foundation and worked with the contracting office to find a source for the
more than 180 cubic meters of concrete that was poured to create the foundation, all this
before they even started erecting the tower. Getting the concrete to the site was a
challenge in and of itself, said Colonel Schultz. "The nearest concrete batch plant
to the construction site was a 30 minute drive. The challenge in that was when hauling
concrete in 120 degree weather, the concrete can only stay in the truck for 45 minutes
before it hardens up." "This meant during perfect driving conditions, we would
only have 15 minutes to get the concrete poured once we got it to the site." To add
even more on the engineers’ plate, driving conditions were not always perfect. "Many
times while transporting concrete from the batch plant to the site, the road went red,
meaning the roads were closed due to gun fights and militia attacks," said Colonel
Schultz. "Once, because of being held up due to militia forces fighting, the EI team
had to dump two full truckloads of concrete on the side of the road. If they hadn’t, the
concrete would have dried up inside the trucks rendering them useless." Fighting
didn’t only hold up the construction process during concrete transport. "At one
point, all construction work had to stop for an entire week. There was fighting in the
town where the batch plant was, and the EI team was receiving mortar attacks at the site
and had to stay in the bunkers. Curfews were set due to the fighting causing additional
problems since no one was allowed to drive," said Colonel Schultz. After the team was
finally able to finish the foundation work, they started to actually build the tower.
"The construction of the tower went smooth until the EI team was ready to build above
100 feet," said Colonel Schultz. "At that point they had to bring in a bigger
crane because their current one could only reach 100 feet." Knowing they would be
limited by the capabilities of the first crane team began working more than a month in
advance of needing the large crane just to complete the contracting paperwork for the
larger crane. "When it was time to transport the crane, we found out it was too big
to be transported by truck and trailer. The crane had a lift capacity of 300 tons and a
reach of 365 feet. It was so large in fact it had to be moved under its own power."
"Unfortunately it had a maximum speed of 25 mph, and had to stop to cool off every 30
minutes, not a good thing in this part of the world. It took a week’s worth of
coordination and a couple of days just to get it to the site; a couple of long days."
"Because the crane was so large and we were required to go through several
checkpoints to get to the site, several barriers and barricades had to be moved to get the
crane through the checkpoints. This of course required a lot of coordination with convoy
security and our coalition partners who were manning some of the checkpoints," said
Colonel Schultz. "Once we got the crane to the site, we were able to finish building
the tower, and it is in use today providing enhanced communications in the AOR."
"In spite of all the hurdles, we actually finished the project three days ahead of
schedule." "I am extremely proud of the Airmen who persevered through all the
obstacles put in front of them during this particular project." For their efforts
this team was awarded the Combined Air Operations Center’s award for Outstanding Team of
the Quarter by Maj. Gen. William Holland, deputy Combined Forces Air Component commander
for U.S. Central Command. "It’s Airmen like these who make the mission happen and
keep us winning the war on terrorism." NORAD to track Santa’s trek around world
PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFPN) — In advance of the holiday season and its 51st
season of tracking Santa Claus on his annual journey around the world, the North American
Aerospace Defense Command activated its "NORAD Tracks Santa" Web site for 2006.
The U.S.-Canadian command’s program began in 1955 when an errant phone call was made to
NORAD’s predecessor, the Continental Air Defense Command Operations Center in Colorado
Springs, Colo. The call was from a local child who dialed a misprinted telephone number in
a local newspaper advertisement. The commander who answered the phone that night gave the
youngster the information he requested – the whereabouts of Santa Claus – and thus the
tradition of NORAD tracking Santa began. The program has grown immensely since it was
first presented on the Internet in 1998. Last year, the Web site received 912 million
"hits" from 204 countries and territories. In addition, the NORAD Tracks Santa
Operations Center, occupied by 550 volunteers on Christmas Eve, answered nearly 55,000
phone calls and nearly 98,240 e-mails from children around the world. The Web site,
http://www.noradsanta.org, features the history of the program, information on how NORAD tracks
Santa and interactive games. The Web site will feature a minute-by-minute update on
Santa’s travels around the world on Dec. 24, beginning at 2 a.m. Mountain time. All of
this information is available English, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish.
Island Web Studios, America Online, Akami, Analytical Graphics, Globelink Language and
Cultural Services, Qwest Communications, Verizon, and Microsoft Virtual Earth help to make
the program possible, NORAD officials said. (Courtesy of Air Force Press Service) Air
Force, industry must partner to create synth-fuel demand by Staff Sgt. C. Todd Lopez Air
Force Print News WASHINGTON (AFPN) — The Air Force must partner with the civilian
aviation industry to create a stronger demand for alternative fuel sources. During a
conference of defense industry representatives here Nov. 14, Michael Aimone, Air Force
assistant deputy chief of staff for logistics, installations and mission support,
explained how the Air Force is looking for ways to get more of the fuel it uses from
domestic sources. Within the federal government, the Air Force is the single largest user
of energy, and some 80 percent of that energy is aviation fuel for aircraft — about 3
billion gallons a year. "If we want to get to an assured domestic source of supply,
using coal, oil, shale, and bio-mass, then we need to find a way to take that … and
liquefy it for aviation use," he said. "We have conducted three demonstration
flights in the B-52 (Stratofortress) earlier this year and proved to ourselves that the
logistics systems as well as the flight systems can handle the synth-fuel blend."
Alternative fuels like those used in the B-52 experiment can be produced from domestically
available hydrocarbon products like natural gas, coal and shale. Gasification can convert
any hydrocarbon feedstock (raw material required for an industrial process) into a
synthesis gas that can then be converted into any number of liquid fuel products. In
addition to the roughly 3 billion gallons of jet fuel a year used by the Air Force, the
civilian aviation industry consumes 12 to 13 billion gallons a year. Mr. Aimone said if
the use of alternative fuels is to move forward, users of the fuels must partner together
to create a demand for it. "The best way to bring an industry together is to partner
with the other industries that use aviation fuel and bring a total requirement of about 16
billion gallons a year to the marketplace, as opposed to the two or three that the Air
Force might bring," he said. Besides looking for alternative fuel sources, Air Force
officials are also looking into ways to reduce the service’s overall use of jet fuel
through waste reduction. "We waste a lot of energy flying around certain countries
because they will not give us over-flight permission," he explained. "Over the
last five months we have worked aggressively with the various aviation sectors to be able
to get some streamlined diplomatic clearance processes." The Air Force has also made
changes to how much fuel can remain in a KC-135 Stratotanker when it lands. In the past,
those aircraft may have had to dump fuel before landing. "Can we raise the landing
limits on the KC-135, so the airplanes can come back heavier? Sure we can," he said.
"We did it this year. (It’s part of) a series of conservation initiatives, some of
them pretty obvious when you think about it." Readiness troops train for the future
by Senior Airman Brian Ferguson Air Force Print News FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo (AFPN) — Civil
engineering readiness troops from around the Air Force are getting some advanced training
here, learning new techniques for dealing with chemical, biological and radiological
threats. Instructors teaching the classes are creating a realistic environment for
students, whose career field could some day lead them outside the wire in Afghanistan or
Iraq. "Readiness troops are responding in (Operation Iraqi Freedom) and (Operation
Enduring Freedom) on a regular basis, outside the wire, supporting coalition
command," said Tech. Sgt. James Smith, readiness technician. "We are giving them
advanced tactics, techniques and procedures to use in the ever changing transformation of
our career field." Based on lessons learned from actual responses in OIF and OEF,
instructors have tried to tailor many of the scenarios to actual events. "Commanders
in the field have identifies a need for this type of response," said Sergeant Smith.
"If we can assess insurgents capability, we can take steps to mitigate the
threat." Scenarios included possible terrorist activity, as well as radiolical,
biological and chemical threats. Students respond to rooms set up with simulated chemicals
and explosives, attacks and weapons caches. "This is a fairly new course, and we are
trying to make it realistic to the environment they could be facing," said Sgt.
Smith. Students were given these scenarios after almost two weeks of classroom training
where they designed plans to deal with situations like these. "When the students
arrive, none of the pre-planning is done for them. The students have to build their own
contingency plan," said Sergeant Smith. "This type of training allows the junior
staff sergeants to hone and build their skills. Six classes have been through the newly
revised two week, 80 hour course, and these students are taking knowledge back to their
bases to teach other readiness troops the skills they have learned. "The feedback
that we’ve gotten from the students is that they’ve learned so many things coming through
here, that they feel better prepared for when they have to deploy," said Sergeant
Smith. "If they come across a situations that we’ve set up here," he said,
"they will be prepared. They can respond to the situation, get the job done and
continue the mission." CENTAF releases airpower summary for Nov. 17 SOUTHWEST ASIA
(AFPN) — U.S. Central Command Air Forces officials have released the airpower summary for
Nov. 17. In Afghanistan Nov. 16, Royal Air Force Harrier GR-7s provided close-air support
for International Security Assistance Force, or ISAF, troops in contact with Taliban
extremists near Now Zad. The GR-7s expended rockets on enemy positions. Air Force A-10
Thunderbolt IIs provided close-air support to ISAF troops in contact with enemy forces
near Kandahar. Navy F/A-18Es provided close-air support to ISAF troops in contact with
enemy forces near Lashkar Gah. In total, 42 close-air-support missions were flown in
support of ISAF and Afghan troops, reconstruction activities and route patrols.
Additionally, six U.S. and Royal Air Force intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance,
or ISR, aircraft flew missions in support of operations in Afghanistan. Navy fighter
aircraft performed in non-traditional ISR roles with their electro-optical and infrared
sensors. In Iraq, Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons and F-15E Strike Eagles provided
close-air support to troops in contact with anti-Iraqi forces near Baghdad. The F-16s and
F-15Es expended cannon rounds on enemy positions. Air Force F-16s provided close air
support to troops in contact with anti-Iraqi forces near Samarra. In total, coalition
aircraft flew 32 close-air-support missions for Operation Iraqi Freedom. These missions
included support to coalition troops, infrastructure protection, reconstruction activities
and operations to deter and disrupt terrorist activities. Additionally, 16 Air Force and
Navy ISR aircraft flew missions in support of operations in Iraq. On Nov. 15, Air Force
rescue and medical crews on HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopters flew a medical evacuation mission
in support of OEF. Three Afghan National Army soldiers with injuries requiring urgent care
were evacuated as a result of this mission. Air Force C-130 Hercules and C-17 Globemaster
IIIs provided intra-theater heavy airlift support, helping sustain operations throughout
Afghanistan, Iraq and the Horn of Africa. They flew 140 airlift sorties, delivered 430
tons of cargo and transported 3,480 passengers. Coalition C-130 crews from Australia,
Canada, Japan and South Korea flew in support of OIF or OEF. On Nov. 15, U.S., RAF, French
and Singaporean Air Force tankers flew 35 sorties and off-loaded more than 2.3 million
pounds of fuel. New aggressor units expand training capabilities by Staff Sgt. C. Todd
Lopez Air Force Print News WASHINGTON (AFPN) — Unit changes at Nellis and Eielson Air
Force bases have resulted in two wings that, together, create better opportunities for Air
Force pilots to train for combat against potential adversaries. In January, the 65th
Aggressor Squadron was reactivated under the 57th Adversary Tactics Group at Nellis AFB,
Nevada. The 65th AGRS, an F-15 Eagle unit, is a sister squadron to the existing 64th AGRS,
an F-16 Fighting Falcon unit. About 2,300 miles north of Nellis, at Eielson AFB, Alaska,
the 354th Operations Group is also adding an aggressor squadron. There, the 18th Fighter
Squadron is preparing to swap its current fleet of Block-40 F-16 Fighting Falcons for the
Block-30 version. In October 2007, the unit will change its name to the 18th AGRS. An
aggressor squadron such as the 65th AGRS acts as a training aid for other military pilots.
Aggressor squadron aircraft are flown by pilots specially trained to act as enemy aircraft
during air combat exercises. While Air Force aggressor pilots fly aircraft such as the
F-16 and the F-15, during exercises they fly as though they are in adversary aircraft, and
they only use aircraft capabilities that would be available to enemy pilots. The most
visible use of that training comes during exercises called "Red Flag – Nellis"
and "Red Flag – Alaska." In those exercises, "friendly" blue forces —
the participating units — fly against "hostile" red forces — the aggressor
squadrons — in mock combat situations. In the past, only Nellis hosted Red Flag
exercises. With two Air Force bases now hosting the exercises, there are more
opportunities for mission-ready pilots to test their combat mettle in lifelike air-to-air
scenarios. And though the two Red Flag exercises are held in different parts of the
country, they both provide the same level of training to pilots who attend, said Brig.
Gen. David J. Scott, commander of the 354th Fighter Wing at Eielson. "They’re not
going to be identical, they’re not going to be perfectly the same — what they’re going to
be is complementary and compatible," he said. "And what we mean by that is you
can go to either one of them and get the full spectrum. If a Spangdahlem (pilot) shows up
at Nellis or at Eielson, it won’t matter. The T-shirt may be a different color, but it
will be the same training." The full spectrum of training includes more than just
training against enemy aircraft. The 527th and 26th Space Aggressor Squadrons at Schriever
AFB, Colo., replicate enemy threats to space-based systems while the 177th Information
Aggressor Squadron at McConnell AFB, Kan., replicates hostile threats to information
systems. These units round out the 57th ATG’s ability to present a complete array of
threats to friendly forces — air, ground, space and cyberspace. In December, the group’s
507th Combat Training Squadron will become the 507th Air Defense Aggressor Squadron. The
redesignated squadron will focus on operating ground-based elements of an
"enemy" integrated air defense system including early warning, ground-controlled
intercept and acquisition radars, and surface-to-air missile systems. While Eielson will
not be adding similar squadrons to its 354th OG, the units will be shared between both Red
Flag – Nellis and Red Flag – Alaska, adding new dimensions to the exercise, said Col.
Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, commander of the 57th ATG. "What we are trying to do is
put all our adversary forces under one umbrella — to get the synergy of having
multi-discipline folks together in one effort — so when we present a threat we don’t
present it in one dimension, but in an integrated fashion," he said. "We’ll have
our surface-to-air threat, our air threat, the information operations side, (the) advanced
electronic warfare issues, and even our space aggressors, to try to present what we call
the complete enemy target set." Red Flag exercises are attended by pilots and ground
crews alike. And with the addition of Red Flag – Alaska, there are now more opportunities
for pilots and ground crews to train. Air Force, Navy, and allied air forces participate
in the exercises. Everybody who attends a Red Flag will now be challenged by the variety
of new capabilities that have been included with the addition of the new types of
aggressor units. But the primary goal of Red Flag remains the same — to ensure that
mission-ready pilots are made as sharp as possible in a controlled, safe environment,
before they are sent out to fight America’s real-world battles, General Scott said.
"If you look back through history, during the first 10 sorties in a war, if (pilots)
hadn’t had any training, that’s when they suffered the highest losses," he said.
"What we want to do is get the young wingman across very intense-type scenarios so he
already has those in his hip pocket. So when he does go to Iraq, Afghanistan or wherever
we send him, he has that and has already lived under those kinds of high-intensity,
stressful situations." PACAF commander advises discretion in cyberspace by Marine
Sgt. Jeremy M. Vought HICKAM AIR FORCE BASE, Hawaii (AFPN) — First proposed in 1929 by a
Hungarian writer in a short story titled "Chains," the theory states that every
person on earth is connected to every other person within six degrees. With the advent of
the Web, those connections are much easier as humanity is connected by the keyboard and
mouse and through social networking vehicles such as MySpace and You Tube. General Paul V.
Hester, the Pacific Air Forces commander, voiced his praises and concerns toward social
networking on such Internet sites and stressed that what is posted could get distorted by
someone else, or pieced together with other information that could jeopardize yourself,
your family or your fellow servicemembers. MySpace, You Tube, Live Journal and Face Book
are some of those sites. For today’s servicemembers the ability to keep in touch with
friends and loved ones has never been easier, but with the growth of these networks comes
the need to exercise caution with posting your information online. "I think you need
to be careful as to how you release that information and document that information and
show yourself fully to the world," General Hester said. With more than 130 million
users on MySpace and 65 thousand videos uploaded daily on You Tube, Air Force leaders
remind servicemembers they not only represent their service 24/7, but also what is posted
can also have an effect on operational security. "We of course realize there is no
off-the-job time in its purest form for those of us in the military, but nonetheless, we
have private time away from the office setting and the flightline. At those moments we are
in fact the same person, we must adhere to the same standards, we must adhere to the same
rules as when you are on duty or on the job," General Hester said. General Hester
added that while social networking over the Internet is a great resource to keep in
contact with loved ones; troops must use good discretion and treat the Internet like the
halls of a schoolhouse, where information no matter how seemingly harmless could be
harmful to yourself and fellow servicemembers. "We need to consider that
strongly," General Hester said. "As you in fact release your private life to
those who can do you harm and can in fact do your service harm if you release the wrong
information on the World Wide Web." When you can be connected in six degrees to
anyone on the earth, even information you publicly give to those you trust can easily fall
into the wrong hands. 3 graduate from new C-5 schoolhouse at Lackland by Master Sgt.
Collen McGee 433rd Airlift Wing Public Affairs LACKLAND AIR FORCE BASE, Texas (AFPN) —
Three Airmen walked away from Kelly Field here secure in the knowledge that they were each
the first in their class — the first to complete training at this new C-5 Galaxy Formal
Training Unit Complex. The new aircrew members consisted of flight engineer Senior Airman
Raymond Montanino, and pilots 1st Lt. Paul Sloan and 2nd Lt. Blair Preston. They took
initial classroom training at the Altus AFB, Okla., school and then came to the new
complex here to get their practical flight training. The three climbed down the ladder
Oct. 20 and asked if they had passed. They didn’t get their answer until the final
debriefing. "They were the perfect students," said Maj. Kevin Kelly, the
instructor pilot. "I’m spoiled already, but I know the kind of instruction they
received at Altus and the quality shows." The trio will return to their home units
with new skills and the knowledge they were a part of a pivotal point in history where,
for the first time, an Air Force Reserve Command unit trained aircrews from all of the Air
Force components – active duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve. "For years,
old pilots would ask young pilots ‘where did you learn that son?’" said Col. Delbert
Lewis, 433rd Operations Group commander. "For years the answer was Altus. You guys
will be able to say, ‘I learned it at Kelly Field, Lackland.’" Colonel Lewis had some
special words for Airman Montanino, a native of San Antonio, serving on active duty.
"You will be an expert of the airplane systems," Colonel Lewis told him. Colonel
Lewis explained that the flight engineer is the technical expert of the front-end crew and
has a great deal of responsibility for the safety and success of each mission. Airman
Montanino will go from Kelly Field to his first active-duty assignment at Travis AFB,
Calif. Lieutenant Sloan returns to his New York Air National Guard wing. Lieutenant
Preston will serve at the new ANG C-5 wing in West Virginia. The next students in line for
formal C-5 initial flight qualification training began their training just hours after the
first three graduated. Students are transferring from the Altus AFB facility to the new
Lackland complex in 25 percent increments each quarter. By the final quarter of fiscal
year 2007, all C-5 aircrew students will get their ground and air training from the Air
Force Reserve’s 433rd Airlift Wing. A ribbon-cutting ceremony Nov. 30 will emphasize the
Total Force role of the Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard and regular Air Force
working together toward a common goal — training C-5 aircrews to maintain U.S. air
superiority. (Courtesy of Air Force Reserve Command News Service) Portland reservists
remember King 56 crew by Maj. James R. Wilson 939th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs
PORTLAND, Ore. (AFPN) — The Air Force Reserve has found a new home for a memorial created
in honor of 10 former Portland reservists. Officials from the 939th Air Refueling Wing
will re-dedicate the memorial in a ceremony Nov. 17 at Willamette National Cemetery. The
black granite marble stone monument was dedicated to the crew members of a C-130 aircraft,
call sign King 56. They died when their plane crashed while on a training mission Nov. 22,
1996. Members of the unit decided to move the monument from the Portland Air Base to the
cemetery because the Base Realignment and Closure Commission decided to downsize Air Force
Reserve Command’s presence in Oregon. "It was important for us to secure a more
permanent home for this monument considering the drawdown of our mission," said Col.
William Flanigan, 939th ARW commander. "We can’t imagine a more appropriate place for
this beautiful remembrance than Willamette National Cemetery, where so many of our
nation’s heroes are buried." King 56 gained media attention in October after Air
Force Mortuary officials received remains thought to be of a King 56 crewmember. A fishing
boat crew discovered the remains in late September near Punta Gorda, Calif. The Air Force
used mitochondrial DNA to confirm the remains are of Staff Sgt. Jonathan R. Leonard. The
sergeant was an Air Force intelligence specialist traveling with the crew en route to
North Island, Calif. Eight of the crewmembers from King 56 have markers or headstones at
Willamette. (Courtesy of Air Force Reserve Command News Service) Commentary – What makes a
wingman? by Chaplain (Capt.) Chad Bellamy 50th Space Wing Chapel Service Team SCHRIEVER
AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFPN) — The single greatest characteristic of Americans is their
willingness to accept a challenge. That statement in and of itself could venture down many
paths, but take a moment to consider how often you’ve personally challenged yourself. Have
you ever looked at a sudoku board, a crossword or a thousand-piece jigsaw puzzle and
thought, "no problem," only to still be working on it two weeks later? The truth
is that they are typically more difficult than they first appear. Today’s wingman concept
is nothing new. Col. Francis "Gabby" Gabreski, an early Air Force pioneer who is
credited with 28 aerial victories in WWII, said this: "The wingman is absolutely
indispensable. I look after the wingman. The wingman looks after me. It’s another set of
eyes protecting you. That’s the defensive part. "Offensively, it gives you a lot more
firepower. We work together. We fight together. The wingman knows what his
responsibilities are and knows what mine are. Wars are not won by individuals. They’re won
by teams." Today, the strategy of having a good wingman is still relevant, but its
application reaches far beyond the arena of aerial assault. When fighter pilots lift off
into the great expanses of the sky, they may not know what threats lie beyond the horizon.
Similarly, with each new day, we have no idea what lies ahead. The common denominator is
that daily challenges are conquered by responsible choices, and creating a culture of
responsible choices is reinforced by the presence of a good wingman. In the spirit of the
Gabreski quote, "personal battles are not won by individuals; they are won by the
reinforcement of good wingmen." The challenge, like a thousand-piece puzzle, is that
it can sometimes be more difficult than it first appears. The path of least resistance
shouts for us to do nothing while a fellow Airman makes a life or career-threatening
decision; however, accepting the challenge of being a comrade in arms is a daily whisper
for us to courageously be involved. The moral courage to do the right thing is more than
just ornamented words; it is the foundation of our Air Force Core Values: Integrity First.
One could say the acronym TEAM stands for "Together Everyone Achieves More." For
centuries, armed forces have strategized how their individuals can operate as a unit on
the battlefield. Unity is the key to effectiveness: If we want the "more," then
we must have the "together." Your role as a sterling wingman is vital to any
level of success. In the coming year, imagine zero incidents of driving under the
influence, zero substance abuse cases, zero safety incidents, zero domestic violence
reports and zero suicides. If we achieved this vision, our Air Force would be heralded as
a picture of strength and community. This puzzle begins with a thousand little pieces, and
even though it may be more difficult than it first appears, what a beautiful picture it
will be when all the pieces come together. Your piece of the puzzle is important. Make
good decisions. Let’s all be a part of the solution.

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