BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JUNE 28 2011: INFLATION

June 28, 2011 at 2:11 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 28 June now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Tue 6/28/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 28 June 2011

now available on the BIS website

Thomas J Jordan: Financial Stability Report – potential risks and actions

Philipp Hildebrand: Overview of the Swiss and global economy

Jean-Pierre Danthine: Market developments, Swiss monetary policy and foreign exchange reserve management

Philip Lowe: Inflation – the recent past and the future

Lim Hng Kiang: Bank capital adequacy and institutional structure – Singapore’s approach

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at:

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 28 June now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Tue 6/28/11 

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“ANTICIPATIONS”: H.G. WELLS 1901 AND BOLESLAW PRUS

June 27, 2011 at 8:06 am | Posted in Art, Books, History, Literary, Philosophy | Leave a comment

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H.G. Wells Discussed by Boleslaw Prus:

“Visions of the Future” (“Wizje przyszłości,” 1909—a discussion of H.G. Wells‘ 1901 futurological book, Anticipations, which predicted, among other things, the defeat of German imperialism, the ascendancy of the English language, and the existence, by the year 2000, of a “European Union” that would include the Slavic peoples of Central Europe)

Boleslaw Prus

Following is a chronological list of notable works by Bolesław Prus. Translated titles are given, followed by original titles and dates of publication.

Born August 20, 1847
Hrubieszów, Russian Empire

Died May 19, 1912 (aged 64)
Warsaw, Russian Empire

Pen name Bolesław Prus

Occupation Novelist, journalist, short-story writer

Nationality Polish

Period 1872–1912

Genres

Realist novel
Historical novel
Short story
Micro-story
Prose poetry

Literary movement Positivism

Spouse(s) Oktawia Głowacka, née Trembińska

Children An adopted son, Emil Trembiński

Bolesław Prus (pronounced: [bɔ'lεswaf 'prus]; Hrubieszów, 20 August 1847 – 19 May 1912, Warsaw), born Aleksander Głowacki, was the leading figure in Polish literature of the late 19th century[1] and a distinctive voice in world literature.

As a 15-year-old, he had joined the Polish 1863 Uprising against Imperial Russia; shortly after his sixteenth birthday, in a battle against Russian forces, he suffered severe injuries. Five months later, he was imprisoned for his part in the Uprising. These early experiences may have precipitated the panic disorder and agoraphobia that would dog him through life, and shaped his opposition to attempts to regain Polish independence by force of arms.

In 1872 at age 25, in Warsaw, he settled into a 40-year journalistic career that highlighted science, technology, education, and economic and cultural development. These societal enterprises were essential to the endurance of a people that had in the 18th century been partitioned out of political existence by Russia, Prussia and Austria. Głowacki took his pen name Prus from the appellation of his family’s coat-of-arms.

As a sideline he wrote short stories. Achieving success with these, he went on to employ a larger canvas. Over the decade between 1884 and 1895, he completed four major novels: The Outpost, The Doll, The New Woman and Pharaoh.

The Doll depicts the romantic infatuation of a man of action who is frustrated by his country’s backwardness. Pharaoh, Prus’ only historical novel, is a study of political power and of the fates of nations, set in ancient Egypt at the fall of the 20th Dynasty and New Kingdom.

Bolesław Prus (pronounced: [bɔ'lεswaf 'prus]; Hrubieszów, 20 August 1847 – 19 May 1912, Warsaw), born Aleksander Głowacki, was the leading figure in Polish literature of the late 19th century[1] and a distinctive voice in world literature.

As a 15-year-old, he had joined the Polish 1863 Uprising against Imperial Russia; shortly after his sixteenth birthday, in a battle against Russian forces, he suffered severe injuries. Five months later, he was imprisoned for his part in the Uprising. These early experiences may have precipitated the panic disorder and agoraphobia that would dog him through life, and shaped his opposition to attempts to regain Polish independence by force of arms.

In 1872 at age 25, in Warsaw, he settled into a 40-year journalistic career that highlighted science, technology, education, and economic and cultural development. These societal enterprises were essential to the endurance of a people that had in the 18th century been partitioned out of political existence by Russia, Prussia and Austria. Głowacki took his pen name Prus from the appellation of his family’s coat-of-arms.

As a sideline he wrote short stories. Achieving success with these, he went on to employ a larger canvas. Over the decade between 1884 and 1895, he completed four major novels: The Outpost, The Doll, The New Woman and Pharaoh.

The Doll depicts the romantic infatuation of a man of action who is frustrated by his country’s backwardness. Pharaoh, Prus’ only historical novel, is a study of political power and of the fates of nations, set in ancient Egypt at the fall of the 20th Dynasty and New Kingdom.

1. “Undoubtedly the most important novelist of the period was Bolesław Prus…” Czesław Miłosz, The History of Polish Literature, 2nd ed., Berkeley, University of California Press, 1983, ISBN 0-520-04477-0, p. 291.

Novels

  • Souls in Bondage (Dusze w niewoli, written 1876, serialized 1877)
  • Fame (Sława, begun 1885, never finished)
  • The Outpost (Placówka, 1885–86)
  • The Doll (Lalka, 1887–89)
  • The New Woman (Emancypantki, 1890–93)
  • Pharaoh (Faraon, written 1894–95; serialized 1895–96)
  • Children (Dzieci, 1908; approximately the first nine chapters had originally appeared, in a somewhat different form, in 1907 as Dawn [Świt])
  • Changes (Przemiany, begun 1911–12; unfinished)

Stories

  • “The Old Lady’s Troubles” (“Kłopoty babuni,” 1874)
  • “The Palace and the Hovel” (“Pałac i rudera,” 1875)
  • “The Ball Gown” (“Sukienka balowa,” 1876)
  • “An Orphan’s Lot” (“Sieroca dola,” 1876)
  • “Eddy’s Adventures” (“Przygody Edzia,” 1876)
  • “Damned Luck” (“Przeklęte szczęście,” 1876)
  • “The Old Lady’s Casket” (“Szkatułka babki,” 1878)
  • “Stan’s Adventure” (“Przygoda Stasia,” 1879)
  • “New Year” (“Nowy rok,” 1880)
  • “The Returning Wave” (“Powracająca fala,” 1880)
  • “Michałko” (1880)
  • “Antek” (1880)
  • “The Convert” (“Nawrócony,” 1880)
  • “The Barrel Organ” (“Katarynka,” 1880)
  • “One of Many” (“Jeden z wielu,” 1882)
  • “The Waistcoat” (“Kamizelka,” 1882)
  • “Him” (“On,” 1882)
  • Fading Voices” (“Milknące głosy,” 1883)
  • “Sins of Childhood” (“Grzechy dzieciństwa,” 1883)
  • Mold of the Earth” (“Pleśń świata,” 1884—a striking micro-story that portrays human history as an unending series of conflicts among mindless, blind colonies of molds)
  • The Living Telegraph” (“Żywy telegraf,” 1884)
  • Orestes and Pylades” (“Orestes i Pylades,” 1884)
  • “Loves—Loves Not?…” (“Kocha—nie kocha?…” 1884)
  • “The Mirror” (“Zwierciadło,” 1884)
  • “On Vacation” (“Na wakacjach,” 1884)
  • “An Old Tale” (“Stara bajka,” 1884)
  • “In the Light of the Moon” (“Przy księżycu,” 1884)
  • “The Mistake” (“Omyłka,” 1884)
  • “Mr. Dutkowski and His Farm” (“Pan Dutkowski i jego folwark,” 1884)
  • “Musical Echoes” (“Echa muzyczne,” 1884)
  • “In the Mountains” (“W górach,” 1885)
  • Shades” (“Ciene,” 1885—an evocative meditation on existential themes)
  • “Anielka” (1885)
  • “A Strange Story” (“Dziwna historia,” 1887)
  • A Legend of Old Egypt” (“Z legend dawnego Egiptu,” 1888—Prus’ first piece of historical fiction; a stunning debut, and a preliminary sketch for his only historical novel, Pharaoh, which would be written in 1894–95)
  • “The Dream” (“Sen,” 1890)
  • “Lives of Saints” (“Z żywotów świętych,” 1891–92)
  • “Reconciled” (“Pojednani,” 1892)
  • “A Composition by Little Frank: About Mercy” (“Z wypracowań małego Frania. O miłosierdziu,” 1898)
  • “The Doctor’s Story” (“Opowiadanie lekarza,” 1902)
  • “Memoirs of a Cyclist” (“Ze wspomnień cyklisty,” 1903)
  • “Revenge” (“Zemsta,” 1908)
  • “Phantoms” (“Widziadła,” 1911, first published 1936)

Nonfiction

  • “Travel Notes (Wieliczka)” ["Kartki z podróży (Wieliczka)," 1878—Prus' impressions of the Wieliczka Salt Mine; these would help inform the conception of the Egyptian Labyrinth in Prus's 1895 novel, Pharaoh]
  • “A Word to the Public” (“Słówko do publiczności,” June 11, 1882—Prus’ inaugural address to readers as the new editor-in-chief of the daily, Nowiny [News], famously proposing to make it “an observatory of societal facts, just as there are observatories that study the movements of heavenly bodies, or—climatic changes.”)
  • “Sketch for a Program under the Conditions of the Present Development of Society” (“Szkic programu w warunkach obecnego rozwoju społeczeństwa,” March 23–30, 1883—swan song of Prus’ editorship of Nowiny)
  • With Sword and Fire—Henryk Sienkiewicz’s Novel of Olden Times” (Ogniem i mieczem—powieść z dawnych lat Henryka Sienkiewicza,” 1884—Prus’ review of Sienkiewicz‘s historical novel, and essay on historical novels)
  • “The Paris Tower” (“Wieża paryska,” 1887—whimsical divagations involving the Eiffel Tower, the world’s tallest structure, then yet to be constructed for the 1889 Paris Exposition Universelle)
  • “Travels on Earth and in Heaven” (“Wędrówka po ziemi i niebie,” 1887—Prus’ impressions of a solar eclipse that he observed at Mława; these would help inspire the solar-eclipse scenes in his 1895 novel, Pharaoh)
  • “A Word about Positive Criticism” (“Słówko o krytyce pozytywnej,” 1890—Prus’ part of a polemic with Positivist guru Aleksander Świętochowski)
  • “Eusapia Palladino” (1893—newspaper column about mediumistic séances held in Warsaw by the Italian Spiritualist, Eusapia Palladino; these would help inspire similar scenes in Prus’ 1895 novel, Pharaoh)
  • “From Nałęczów” (“Z Nałęczowa,” 1894—Prus’ paean to the salubrious waters and natural and social environment of his favorite vacation spot, Nałęczów)
  • The Most General Life Ideals (Najogólniejsze ideały życiowe, 1905—Prus’s system of pragmatic ethics)
  • “Ode to Youth” (“Oda do młodości,” 1905—Prus’ admission that, before the Russian Empire‘s defeat in the Russo-Japanese War, he had held too cautious a view of the chances for an improvement in Poland’s political situation)
  • “Visions of the Future” (“Wizje przyszłości,” 1909—a discussion of H.G. Wells‘ 1901 futurological book, Anticipations, which predicted, among other things, the defeat of German imperialism, the ascendancy of the English language, and the existence, by the year 2000, of a “European Union” that would include the Slavic peoples of Central Europe)
  • “The Poet, Educator of the Nation” (“Poeta wychowawca narodu,” 1910—a discussion of the cultural and political principles imparted by the Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz)
  • “What We… Never Learned from the History of Napoleon” (“Czego nas… nie nauczyły dzieje Napoleona”—Prus’s contribution to the December 16, 1911, issue of the Warsaw Illustrated Weekly, devoted entirely to Napoleon)

Translations

Prus‘ writings have been translated into many languages — his historical novel Pharaoh, into twenty; his contemporary novel The Doll

, into at least sixteen. Works by Prus have been rendered into Croatian by a member of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Stjepan Musulin.

Film versions

  • 1966: Faraon (Pharaoh), adapted from the novel Pharaoh, directed by Jerzy Kawalerowicz
  • 1968: Lalka (The Doll), adapted from the novel The Doll, directed by Wojciech Has
  • 1978: Lalka (The Doll), adapted from the novel The Doll, directed by Ryszard Ber
  • 1979: Placówka (The Outpost), adapted from the novel The Outpost, directed by Zygmunt Skonieczny
  • 1982: Pensja Pani Latter (Mrs. Latter’s Boarding School), adapted from the novel The New Woman

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BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JUNE 23 2011: GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS

June 25, 2011 at 2:12 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 23 June now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Sat 6/25/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 23 June 2011

now available on the BIS website

Masaaki Shirakawa: Money, government securities and a central bank

Mugur Isărescu: Economic governance in the European Union

Philipp Hildebrand: The independence of the Swiss National Bank

Javier Aríztegui: The financial crisis and the restructuring of the Spanish banking system

Njuguna Ndung’u: Developments in the banking sector in Kenya

Mugur Isărescu: International Financial Reporting Standards – international experience and implementation by the banking sector in Romania in 2012

Mark Carney: Opening Statement for Appearance before the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce

Glenford Ysaguirre: From the global financial crisis to more robust regulatory frameworks and resilient financial systems

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 23 June now available‏

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Sat 6/25/11

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JAPAN BILATERAL OFFSET CREDIT MECHANISMS: CLIMATE CHANGE

June 23, 2011 at 6:38 am | Posted in Earth, Ecology, Economics, Financial, Globalization | Leave a comment

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New Mechanisms Information Platform E-mail Newsletter

-Promoting New Market Mechanisms for Climate Change Mitigation- 

E-mail Newsletter service started regarding Japan’s new initiative on Bilateral Offset Credit Mechanisms (BOCM)‏

Shiho Segawa (segawa@oecc.or.jp)

Thu 6/23/11

New Mechanisms Information Platform is an outreach programme newly launched in March 2011, by the Ministry of the Environment, Japan (MOEJ), which provides official information on Japan’s new initiatives on Bilateral Offset Credit Mechanisms(BOCM) to promote climate change mitigation actions and sustainable development under the partnership between developing countries and Japan, through development and transfer of low carbon technologies.

We are pleased to inform you that New Mechanisms Information Platform started issuing “New Mechanisms Information Platform E-mail Newsletter”(distributed approximately once a month). If you wish to receive the newsletter, please fill in the form below.

http://mmechanisms.org/e/mailmagazine.html

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

With best regards,

 Shiho Segawa (Ms.)

New Mechanisms Information Platform/

Overseas Environmental Cooperation Center, Japan (OECC)

Shibakoen Annex 7th floor,

3-1-8 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0011, Japan

Phone: +81-3-5472-0144  Fax: +81-3-5472-0145

Email: info@mmechanisms.org/ segawa@oecc.or.jp

URL: http://mmechanisms.org/e/index.html

New Mechanisms Information Platform E-mail Newsletter

-Promoting New Market Mechanisms for Climate Change Mitigation- 

E-mail Newsletter service started regarding Japan’s new initiative on Bilateral Offset Credit Mechanisms (BOCM)‏

Shiho Segawa (segawa@oecc.or.jp)

Thu 6/23/11 

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GREEN GROWTH

June 22, 2011 at 4:29 pm | Posted in Development, Earth, Financial, Globalization, Research | Leave a comment

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GREEN GROWTH CRITICAL TO ASIA-PACIFIC FOOD

AND ENERGY SECURITY, UN SAYS

unnews@un.org

New York, Jun 20 2011

GREEN GROWTH CRITICAL TO ASIA-PACIFIC FOOD AND ENERGY SECURITY, UN SAYS

Mon, 20 Jun 2011

Asia-Pacific countries can cushion themselves against food and fuel price shocks and natural disasters by more efficient use of resources and energy, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) said today.

The current “energy, resource and carbon-intensive” development pattern must give way to green growth to reduce wasteful use of resources and energy, Noeleen Heyzer, Executive Secretary of ESCAP, “http://www.unescap.org/unis/press/2011/jun/g23.asp told 800 people from 25 countries attending the Global Green Growth Summit in Seoul, organized by the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Dr. Heyzer said green growth was particularly important at a time when the Asia-Pacific region faces triple threats from recurring climate-related natural disasters and soaring food and fuel prices.

“Green growth remains an essential and urgent task for enhancing the energy and food security of each country (in the Asia-Pacific region),” she said.

Latest estimates indicate that rising food and oil prices can keep an additional 42 million people in the region in poverty in 2011, according to ESCAP.

The region is also the world’s most vulnerable to natural disasters, with its people four times more likely to be affected by nature’s wrath than those in Africa and 25 times more likely than those in Europe or North America, ESCAP said.

“Green growth, as one of the strategies to achieve sustainable development by improving the efficiency of the way we use our energy, resources, and in particular carbon, is no longer only an ecological conditionality but also an imperative to improve resilience of our economy against energy, food and resource price volatility,” Dr. Heyzer said.

“For Asia and the Pacific, a region whose efficiency in using energy and resources still remains low, improving the efficiency of our production and consumption will provide us with a new engine of growth,” the ESCAP chief said.

Representatives of some 52 countries endorsed an initiative on environmentally sustainable economic growth in Seoul in 2005.

Jun 20 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

CITIES ARE KEY TO GLOBAL ENERGY AND CLIMATE

CHALLENGES, BAN TELLS US MAYORS

New York, Jun 20 2011

CITIES ARE KEY TO GLOBAL ENERGY AND CLIMATE CHALLENGES, BAN TELLS US MAYORS

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has called on United States mayors to help in the worldwide fight against climate change and other energy challenges.

http://www.un.org/apps/sg/sgstats.asp?nid=5359 Speaking to a meeting of the US Conference of Mayors in Baltimore yesterday, Mr. Ban said: “The world needs the mayors of the United States to do their part to address our energy and climate change challenges.”

Mr. Ban told the representatives of some 1,200 American cities with a population exceeding 30,000: “Your efforts can have an outsize impact.”

“You know the potential catastrophe that lies in store if present trends continue: extreme weather, market disruptions, inundated coastlines,” he said. “You also know the role of cities in climate change – for good and ill alike.”

Cities consume more than two-thirds of the world’s energy and account for roughly the same percentage of global carbon dioxide emissions, he said.

Lauding American cities for “already making great advances towards energy efficiency in transit, infrastructure and street lights” and producing, clean, renewable energy, he said: “The smart money is on smart cities – resilient, energy efficient, poised to profit from new, clean, green innovations that will redefine the urban landscape of 21st century.”

“You have taken this challenge to heart, and you are finding it good for job creation and good for the health and happiness of your citizens,” he said. “The upgrades and efforts you are making save money and create well-paying local jobs. And they revitalize the economies of the cities where they are implemented.”

These initiatives forge new industries and claim market share,” he said. “I am sure that your cities have what it takes to join this movement, and stay out front instead of having to play catch-up.”

“For me the message is clear: the road to future peace and progress runs through the world’s cities and towns,” he said.

Jun 20 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

INVESTING IN FIGHT AGAINST POVERTY BRINGS RESULTS, GENERAL ASSEMBLY HEARS

New York, Jun 14 2011

Deputy Secretary-General Asha-Rose Migiro today stressed the need to protect development gains achieved so far despite the fiscal austerity measures undertaken in the wake of the global financial crisis, saying great social benefits arise from investing in poverty eradication programmes.

“In such a climate, we need to scale up those interventions that have the best chance to generate progress across the “http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/bkgd.shtml MDGs [Millennium Development Goals],” said Ms. Migiro in an “http://www.un.org/apps/dsg/dsgstats.asp?nid=280 address to the General Assembly’s Development Dialogue, taking place at United Nations Headquarters in New York.

“We must look for multiplier effects wherever we can. And none is more dramatic, none is more proven, than investments in the health of women and children,” she said.

The eight MDGs – which range from halving extreme poverty to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education, all by the target date of 2015 – form a blueprint agreed to by all the world’s countries and leading development institutions. They have galvanized global efforts to meet the needs of the world’s poorest people.

Underlining the importance of reducing the levels of maternal, newborn and child mortality, Ms. Migiro noted said that healthy women delivered and brought up healthy children who then attended school and became part of a healthy workforce that created prosperous societies.

“We can take heart from gains on the health MDGs. Last year, countries and a broad range of partners pledged more than $40 billion for the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health. At its essence, the strategy is about taking what we know works for women and children, and bringing those efforts to scale,” she added.

She said the strategy has a special focus on information that requires that solid statistics be provided on health-related topics such as births, deaths and causes of death to make it possible to analyse policy across the MDGs. Not enough resources have, however, been invested on the information aspect of the Strategy, Ms. Migiro added.

Stronger accountability is another key feature of the strategy, she said.

“We have a framework that will tell us where the money is coming from, where it is going, and how effectively it is being spent. This ability to track resources and results is critical for ensuring that all partners deliver on their commitments, and that we are achieving tangible progress in achieving our goals,” said Ms. Migiro.

With the MDGs’ 2015 deadline approaching, Ms. Migiro stressed the need to consider what lay beyond. “Even a decade ago, we knew that achieving the MDGs would, in a sense, be only half the job. We knew that there would still be a vast backlog of deprivation.

“The time has come to look at those numbers – at those people – at all the men, women and children who will be barely touched by what we do by 2015, and who will therefore need our attention come 2016 and beyond,’ she said.

In his opening remarks, General Assembly President Joseph Deiss noted that the international community’s commitment to the achievement of the MDGs had gathered pace in recent months.

He highlighted the creation of the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, which he said has significantly increased the mobilization of financial resources for that cause. He also noted the agreement in May on a new 10-year agenda for the so-called Least Developed Countries (LDCs), which focuses on improving the productive capacities of those States.

“The ultimate goal is to transform economies and societies of these countries so that the category of ‘Least Developed Countries’ no longer exists,” said Mr. Deiss.

He also singled out last week’s high-level meeting on HIV/AIDS as another major achievement because the international community had collectively pledged to intensify efforts to combat the pandemic.

“The partners committed to implement a holistic approach, ensuring justice and social inclusion, and where the fight against AIDS is fully integrated into development programmes,” said Mr. Deiss.

He, however, stressed that despite the extremely positive developments in the global fight against diseases and poverty, it must not be forgotten that in many countries and in several sectors, the MDGs may not be achieved by their target date.

“Suffice it here to remind you that hunger still prevails far too often and that millions of children lack access to medicines and appropriate care and still die from diseases that can be avoided.

“This reality confronts us with the fundamental challenge of turning commitments into action and action into results. In making a tangible difference on the ground in the lives of the poor, we demonstrate that the UN is a reliable, credible and accountable.”

Jun 14 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

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DEVELOPMENT ISSUES: GLOBAL

June 22, 2011 at 2:23 pm | Posted in Development, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, Science & Technology | Leave a comment

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SOCIAL INVESTMENTS DESERVE PRIORITY IN ECONOMIC

RECOVERY SCHEMES – UN REPORT

UNNews (UNNews@un.org)

New York, Jun 22 2011

A new United Nations reporthttp://social.un.org/index/ReportontheWorldSocialSituation/2011.aspx“finds that many governments did not pay enough attention to the social implications of the recent global financial crisis and urges that social investments be given priority in recovery programmes.

http://social.un.org/index/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=v0LQqd2FT3k%3d&tabid=1561 “The Report on the World Social Situation 2011: The Global Social Crisis, published today by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), explores the ongoing adverse social consequences of the 2008-2009 financial and economic crisis – the worst since the Great Depression of the 1930s.

One consequence of the crisis is that unemployment rose sharply to 205 million people in 2009 from 178 million in 2007. The loss of jobs means not only a loss of incomes but also an increase in vulnerability, especially in developing countries without comprehensive social protection, notes the report.

It adds that various estimates suggest that between 47 million and 84 million more people fell into, or were trapped in, extreme poverty because of the global crisis, which occurred immediately after food and fuel prices had risen sharply. As a result, the number of people living in hunger in the world rose to over a billion in 2009, the highest on record.

The report states that the global economic downturn has had wide-ranging negative social outcomes for individuals, families, communities and societies, and its impact on social progress in areas such as education and health will only become fully evident over time.

“However, initial estimates show that the effects have been sharp, widespread and deep. Given the fragility of the economic recovery and uneven progress in major economies, social conditions are only expected to recover slowly.

“The increased levels of poverty, hunger and unemployment due to the global crisis will continue to affect billions of people in many developed and developing countries for years to come,” the report says.

It is essential, it adds, that governments take into account the likely social implications of their economic policies. Further, economic policies considered in isolation from their social outcomes can have dire consequences for poverty, employment, nutrition, health and education, which, in turn, adversely affect long-term sustainable development.

“There is renewed realization that social policy considerations, especially productive employment, must be given greater importance within economic policy,” said Jomo Kwame Sundaram, Assistant Secretary-General for Economic Development. “The disconnect between economic policies and their social consequences can create a vicious cycle of slow growth and poor social progress.”

The economic crisis is a reminder, he said, that it is essential for people to be healthy, educated, adequately housed and well fed to be more productive and better able to contribute to society.
Jun 22 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

UN OFFICIAL CAUTIONS AGAINST REDUCING ASSISTANCE TO SMALLHOLDER FARMERS

New York, Jun 21 2011

The head of the United Nations agency tasked with combatting rural poverty today cautioned developed countries against cutting assistance to smallholder farmers in poorer nations, saying most food producers across the world were small-scale growers.

“When people cannot afford to eat because they cannot make a decent living, they become desperate, which led to riots during the 2008 food crisis,” “http://www.ifad.org/media/press/2011/39.htm” said Kanayo Nwanze, the President of the UN International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD), speaking ahead of the two-day Group of 20 (G20) agriculture ministers’ meeting, which opens in Paris tomorrow.

“The current food price increase has pushed an estimated 44 million people into poverty, creating once again a volatile mix. During the last price increase, when smallholders were assisted in accessing markets for finance, seeds and fertilizers, they were able to benefit from higher prices and both poor producers and consumers were better off,” added Mr. Nwanze, who will address the meeting.

France holds the presidency of the G20, which is made up of the world’s largest economies.

The G20 agriculture ministers are tasked with developing an action plan to address price volatility in food and agricultural markets and its impact on the poor. Studies have shown that the gross domestic product (GDP) growth generated by agriculture is more than twice as effective in reducing poverty as expansion in other sectors.

Mr. Nwanze is expected to tell the ministers that the G20 has a comparative advantage in promoting the sharing of experiences of countries that have made significant progress in boosting agricultural production, and which have created an enabling environment for investment in agriculture, including Brazil and China.

In addition, the G20 can strengthen policy coherence and coordination, which is essential in dealing with sensitive issues in trade, biofuels and responsible investment in agriculture, he said.

“I take this message to the ministers on behalf of the smallholder farmers around the world: the development of rural areas is central to overcoming hunger and poverty, mitigating climate change, achieving energy security and protecting the environment, and it is the smallholder farmer that holds the key. But we must seriously start investing in their potential to support them to deliver.”
Jun 21 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

UN OFFICIAL STRESSES NEED FOR UNIVERSAL ACCESS TO ENERGY TO BOOST DEVELOPMENT

New York, Jun 21 2011

The lack of access to affordable and reliable energy is a major hindrance to human, social, and economic development, a senior United Nations official told delegates attending an “http://www.unis.unvienna.org/unis/pressrels/2011/unisous089.html” international forum that got under way in Austria today to discuss ways of ensuring universal access to energy.

“Without access to modern forms of energy it is highly unlikely that any of the objectives of the Millennium Development Goals will be achieved,” said Kandeh K. Yumkella, the Director General of the UN Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO).

Participants in the three-day Vienna Energy Forum – organized by UNIDO, the Austrian Government and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) – highlighted the wide inequality in energy access between rich and poor societies, pointing out that the poorer three quarters of the world’s population use only 10 per cent of global energy.

An estimated 1.5 billion people still do not have access to electricity, and around 3 billion people rely on traditional biomass and coal as their primary source of energy.

Demand for energy in developing countries is expected to grow dramatically, and the increases in population and improvements in living standards are adding to the scale of the challenges, according to delegates at the forum.

Mr. Yumkella noted that China, Peru and Viet Nam have significantly improved their citizens’ access to energy in recent decades, but across sub-Saharan Africa, and in parts of Asia, people still live without basic energy services.

Last year, the UN Secretary-General’s Advisory Group on Energy and Climate Change (AGECC), which is chaired by Mr. Yumkella, called for the adoption of a target to achieve universal access to modern energy services, and for a 40 per cent reduction in energy intensity by 2030.

The forum coincides with the pre-launch of the Global Energy Assessment (GEA), the most comprehensive analysis of the global energy system ever undertaken.

The GEA estimates that the global investments required to achieve the goal of universal access to energy are about $40 billion annually, a small fraction of the total energy infrastructure investment required by 2030.

Jun 21 2011

UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news 

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BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JUNE 22 2011: US ECONOMIC OUTLOOK

June 22, 2011 at 1:07 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research, USA, World-system | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 22 June now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Wed 6/22/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 22 June 2011

now available on the BIS website

Miguel Fernández Ordóñez: Presentation of the 2010 Annual Report

Mark Carney: Canada’s new polymer bank notes – celebrating Canada’s achievements at the frontiers of innovation

Erkki Liikanen: Economic and Monetary Union – lessons from the recent crisis

K C Chakrabarty: Challenges and opportunities in a trillion dollar economy

Zeti Akhtar Aziz: Innovative financing for transformation

Nout Wellink: Looking beyond the current reforms

Charles I Plosser: The US economic outlook and the normalization of monetary policy

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at:

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 22 June now available‏

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Wed 6/22/11 

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BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JUNE 21 2011: GLOBAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM REFORM

June 21, 2011 at 2:05 pm | Posted in Economics, Financial, Globalization, Research, World-system | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 21 June now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Tue 6/21/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 21 June 2011

now available on the BIS website

Jean-Claude Trichet: Economic diversity on both sides of the Atlantic

Jean-Claude Trichet: The euro area and its role in the global economy

Lorenzo Bini Smaghi: Intervention at Sveriges Riksbank conference “Monetary policy in an era of fiscal stress”

Ardian Fullani: Economic and monetary developments in Albania in 2010

K C Chakrabarty: Non-financial reporting – what, why and how – Indian perspective

Subir Gokarn: Financial stability

Svante Öberg: Economic conditions for wage formation

Andreas Dombret: Reform of the global financial system

Ardian Fullani: Recent developments in the Albanian banking system

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at:

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 21 June now available‏

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Tue 6/21/11

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BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS JUNE 17 AND JUNE 20 2011: ASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST

June 20, 2011 at 5:10 pm | Posted in Asia, Development, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Research | Leave a comment

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Central bankers’ speeches for 17 and 20 June 2011 now available‏

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Mon 6/20/11

Central bankers’ speeches for 20 June 2011

now available on the BIS website

Richard W Fisher: Containing (or restraining) systemic risk – the need to not fail on “too big to fail”

Deepak Mohanty: Wrap up and concluding remarks at the SAARCFINANCE Governors’ Symposium

Muhammad Al-Jasser: Diversifying sources of finance

Lim Hng Kiang: Towards a new era of growing connectivity between Asia and the Middle East

Jean-Claude Trichet: Interview with The Times

Central bankers’ speeches for 17 June 2011

now available on the BIS website

Glenn Stevens: Economic conditions and prospects

Mark Carney: Housing in Canada

Mervyn King: Monetary policy developments

Anand Sinha: Macroprudential policies – Indian experience

Daniel K Tarullo: Capital and liquidity standards

Inia Naiyaga: Engineers’ role in economic growth and financial stability

Jürgen Stark: Adjusting monetary policy in a challenging environment

All speeches from 1997 onwards are available from the BIS website at:

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm.

Communications

Bank for International Settlements

E-mail: press@bis.org

Website: www.bis.org

Phone: +41 61 280 8188

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Central bankers’ speeches for 17 and 20 June 2011 now available‏

http://www.bis.org/list/cbspeeches/index.htm

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Press, Service (press@bis.org)

Mon 6/20/11 

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CAMBRIDGE FORECAST GROUP: CFG BACKGROUND ESSAYS

June 20, 2011 at 1:20 am | Posted in CFG, Economics, Financial, Globalization, History, Islam, Israel, World-system | Leave a comment

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BACKGROUND ESSAYS:


Explaining the CFG Home Page

Explaining the CFG Home Page II: The Two World Systems

Explaining the CFG Home Page III

CFG Essay: Explaining the Present

Jerusalem Summits: Zionomics & Counterglobalization

Yemen Times: Israel’s Hidden Agenda by Richard Melson

Muslims & Jews in the World-System

Muslims & Jews in the World-System II

Muslims & Jews in the World-System III: Palestine as Bantustan

Muslims versus Jews

How to Predict the Future

Tomorrow: Muslims versus Jews in Globalization

Israel’s Global Disruption Strategies

Israel’s Global Disruption Strategies II: How Zionist Professors like Efraim Karsh Promote Rabid Islamo-Phobia

Islamic Finance & the Emerging International System

World Islamic Banking Conference: Globalization & Islamic Financial Instruments

Globalization & Development: Islamic Financial Instruments

CFG New Japan Book: December 2005 Release

Economic Growth and Human Capital

Unsustainable Patterns of World Economic Growth

The World Economy from Charlemagne to the Present

The Reagan Revolution

A Primer on Development Economics

Globalization Blocked by Western Judeocentrism

Globalization Blocked by Western Judeocentrism II

Jews & Blacks in the World System

Third World Phobia and US Politics

Islamophobia as Global Zionist Industry

Jerusalem Summits: Global War against Islam as Type of Zionist New World Order

Initial CFG Newsletters & Forecasts

Douglas Feith NSC Letter about CFG Newsletters

Critique of CFG Perspective: Hamano Book Review

Book Proposal by CFG

Circular Flow & Disarticulation

Circular Flow II

Climate Change & Carbon: Professor Daniel Schrag Harvard

Richard Fisher Perspective: Dallas Fed

Lawrence Summers Harvard Speech: Centrality of Third World

History as Context: Mexico I

History as Context: Mexico II

History as Context: Anglo-American Deep History as Root of Recent Neoliberalism

1919: Global & Parochial Views

Globalization: Metaphysical Aspects

Globalization: Metaphysical Aspects II

Globalization: Metaphysical Aspects III

Globalization: Bob Dylan & Zionism

Post-Zionism?

Same Bed, Different Dreams

Zionist New World Order: Arab Cartoons

Zionist New World Order: Arab Cartoons I

Restratification Nightmares: Neocon Anxiety about Non-Zionist New World Order

Strategic Ellipse

Global versus World: Terminology Quest

Globalization of Antagonisms

Zelikow Condoleezza Rice & Israel

© 1997-2008 Cambridge Forecast Group

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